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  • FIRST POST
    • DD265
    • By DD265 8th Oct 16, 5:06 PM
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    DD265
    Preparing for moggie(s) - any advice?
    • #1
    • 8th Oct 16, 5:06 PM
    Preparing for moggie(s) - any advice? 8th Oct 16 at 5:06 PM
    We have been waiting for months for the right time to adopt one or more cats and finally it's coming close. I grew up with cats but my parents never really made any special arrangements; cat flap, food, water, a few toys basically. To be fair the cats always shunned any beds provided anyway.

    We have to have indoor cats however, and we also work full time (I work at home a couple of days a week) so thinking either one cat that likes leaving alone a fair bit, or a bonded pair/litter mates that will keep each other company. I think OH will benefit from a more affectionate playful cat as he's a dog person, so we might be looking at kittens (either way it'll be through the local rescue), although any cat will of course make a beeline for him because they know.

    We have a large open plan living space downstairs. I plan to have at least one litter tray there plus a cat tree with good views outside. I'm leaning towards dry food rather than wet, but will be guided by the rescue. May look at one of those auto feeders if they're worthwhile? Was thinking one of those fresh water supply things, rather than a bowl?

    Upstairs we have a small landing (room for another litter box), bathroom and two bedrooms. I was thinking of another cat tree in the second bedroom. I reckon they'll sleep on the beds/sofa to be honest. Initially the plan would be to let the cat(s) settle in the second bedroom before giving them run of the flat. I'm not sure how much access we'll give when we aren't around yet; we'd normally keep all the doors closed all the time as the hallway is freezing and there's potential for disappearing acts by the main bedroom window (I'm going to need to work out where that goes).

    There will of course be copious toys and cuddles waiting.

    Any advice?
    Barclaycard: £1795.61/£2907.26 - 38% paid
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Page 1
    • mellymoo74
    • By mellymoo74 8th Oct 16, 5:09 PM
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    mellymoo74
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 16, 5:09 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Oct 16, 5:09 PM
    A pair is much better for them.

    Tomcat is a happier cat now he has a pickles to groom, it does mean less cuddles for me but he's so much happier.
    • DD265
    • By DD265 8th Oct 16, 5:23 PM
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    DD265
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 16, 5:23 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Oct 16, 5:23 PM
    A pair is much better for them.

    Tomcat is a happier cat now he has a pickles to groom, it does mean less cuddles for me but he's so much happier.
    Originally posted by mellymoo74
    I agree with you - although experience tells me adding the second cat at a later date doesn't always work out (my parents cats being a case in point).

    Potentially stupid question; do people worm and de-flea their indoor only cats? What about pet insurance?
    Barclaycard: £1795.61/£2907.26 - 38% paid
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    • room512
    • By room512 8th Oct 16, 5:29 PM
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    room512
    • #4
    • 8th Oct 16, 5:29 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Oct 16, 5:29 PM
    We adopted from the RSPCA a couple of months ago and as we work full time they would only let us adopt a pair of kittens so that they would not be lonely. We weren't allowed to adopt just one. We wanted two anyway so it was perfect for us. The price we paid (£60 each) also included chipping, vaccinations and spaying. We both work in a school and got them just over a week before we went back to work so they could settle before we left them all day.

    We had to have a house inspection before we could adopt them. To be honest the process was a lot more rigorous than we expected it to be. This I feel is a good thing as cute little kittens grow into big cats! (just as lovely imo). We have a fresh water fountain but the kittens choose to drink from a bowl. We have another cat so had the fountain already. We kept the kittens confined to the lounge for the first 10 days but now they have the whole house to play in. When they are spayed we can let them out.

    I posted on here when we got them how frightened they were but now 6 weeks later they couldn't be different.

    Good luck with what ever you decide x
    • mellymoo74
    • By mellymoo74 8th Oct 16, 5:32 PM
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    mellymoo74
    • #5
    • 8th Oct 16, 5:32 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Oct 16, 5:32 PM
    Ty hasn't bonded
    Pickles hates him
    He fancies pickles
    Tomcat is not bothered about him either way

    Having fun day with my huge black and white boy, he's playing open the front door to let me in game.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 8th Oct 16, 9:13 PM
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    FreeBear
    • #6
    • 8th Oct 16, 9:13 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Oct 16, 9:13 PM
    I have just the one. She doesn't want to go out even when the door is wide open, so definitely a house cat of her own volition. I did get her a scratching post which she has ignored, preferring to use a coarse mat to sharpen her claws on. Had thought about a tree, but I have doubts that she would use it.

    As I'm around much of the day, she seems to be happy with my company and the catnip mice scattered around the house.
    So many cats, so few good recipes.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.

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    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 8th Oct 16, 9:48 PM
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    GwylimT
    • #7
    • 8th Oct 16, 9:48 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Oct 16, 9:48 PM
    Food wise, I personally wouldn't feed dry, its associated with UTI, crystals, obesity, dehydration and kidney disease. Most are also mainly plant matter, cats are carnivores.

    With litter trays the general rule is one tray per cat and a spare. Remember kittens can't hold it for long, so unless they are always close to a tray there may be the odd accident.

    We worm and flea our cat, but she does have access to our enclosed garden.

    Our cat loves her cat tree and cat shelves, she used her scratching posts but she also scratches furniture, so you can't be house proud!

    I can't wait to see the cuties when they arrive!
    • UKTigerlily
    • By UKTigerlily 9th Oct 16, 7:29 PM
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    UKTigerlily
    • #8
    • 9th Oct 16, 7:29 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Oct 16, 7:29 PM
    I have two kittens who are 16 weeks old today . . i'd definitely get two! Mine spend most of their time chasing each other, playfighting & curled up together sleeping, or grooming each other.

    I agree with whoever said about dry food not being great, I had been looking at foods & have settled on Animonda Carny Kitten, which is grain free & about 65% meat/offal . . they seem to love it.

    Mine haven't been out yet but have both been wormed & flea treated (have never seen a flea on either of them though) & one did pass worms so they more than likely both had them. See what your vet says but i'd definitely do it a few times?

    Mine also love their scratching tree, for their claws they mostly use a tiny one but they love to run up & down the 6ft 3 one & sleep right on the top of it x
    2015 weight loss: 86/100Ibs
    • DD265
    • By DD265 9th Oct 16, 7:33 PM
    • 1,115 Posts
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    DD265
    • #9
    • 9th Oct 16, 7:33 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Oct 16, 7:33 PM
    Thanks all.

    Today I realised that if I'm being honest, feline-time isn't quite as near as I hoped and I have more work to do in the flat first! Mostly of the decluttering variety because I do know what cats, especially kittens, are like for getting into things they shouldn't. Also realised that between the "gym" and putting a bed in the spare room, there won't be quite as much space for a cat tree as I'd thought right now.

    Does anybody know whether a second hand cat tree would be a good/bad idea? The ones I'm looking at aren't necessarily that expensive to begin with, but if it wouldn't be an issue I'd happily buy second hand. We have pretty much decided just to get one cat tree and some smaller scratching posts to dot around.
    Last edited by DD265; 09-10-2016 at 7:36 PM.
    Barclaycard: £1795.61/£2907.26 - 38% paid
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    • no1catman
    • By no1catman 9th Oct 16, 10:38 PM
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    no1catman
    When I collected my previous cat, out of the litter of six, there was just her and her brother left, I was tempted to take them both, but glad I didn't!
    She was 'bad' enough, with climbing the curtains, and scratching the furniture, beds, and later the wallpaper.
    Sometimes, it was just dried food she had, tried wet food, too much wasted, though loved raw liver!!
    But I couldn't have done to bad she lived with me for twenty years, most of those - just the two of us, with me working during the day.
    I used to work for Tesco - now retired - speciality Clubcard
    • Fen1
    • By Fen1 10th Oct 16, 9:37 AM
    • 1,219 Posts
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    Fen1
    I volunteer with a small local cat charity.

    Have you considered adopting an older or disabled cat?
    Most rescue centres will have older cats or cats with needs. Disabled doesn't necessarily mean sickly with lots of vets bills; a cat can be perfectly healthy but blind or deaf so cannot be let outside for their own safety. There are so many lovely cats that are overlooked just because they need a bit more care and have to be kept indoors.

    We regularly take in older cats who have been companions for elderly people. Unfortunately, after the owner dies the cat is left homeless. These cats are often ( not always!) fully housetrained, mostly or completely indoor cats. They are used to the indoor, sedentary life.

    Just because a cat is mature doesn't mean they are on death's door. A cat can live for 20 years, so a 10 year old cat can give you many years of companionship.

    An older cat can also be a lot easier than a kitten as they are already housetrained and massively less hyper energetic. You also know an older cat's personality and disposition.

    If you are unsure about adopting, try fostering. Your local centre will have lots of information about this.
    • paddypaws101
    • By paddypaws101 10th Oct 16, 9:39 AM
    • 1,996 Posts
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    paddypaws101
    Thanks all.

    that between the "gym" and putting a bed in the spare room, there won't be quite as much space for a cat tree as I'd thought right now.

    .
    Originally posted by DD265
    Well the spare bed will become one of the cat's beds and you don't need a huge amount of floor space for a cat tree.....look at the floor to ceiling ones or even some wall shelves which can be used to climb up and snooze on. Even the dead space over the top of a door way can be made into a cat space.
    http://www.zooplus.co.uk/shop/cats/cat_beds_baskets/wall_mounted_cat_bed/366967
    http://www.catsplay.com/cat-wall-climbing-systems
    • DD265
    • By DD265 10th Oct 16, 11:14 AM
    • 1,115 Posts
    • 2,670 Thanks
    DD265
    Have you considered adopting an older or disabled cat?
    Originally posted by Fen1
    Yes and I'm not adverse to it at all for the right cat(s). But either way, it has to be the right cat. Honestly my preference would be a cat that couldn't go outside for whatever reason, as then I don't feel like I'm depriving it of options. We'll be guided by the rescue, anyway.

    There's a 6yo I like the look of but she's not good with children and if we decide to have kids (jury is firmly out!) it would be within her life expectancy. I'm pretty sure The Ferocious GizMog hated us until we grew up, but then she only ever really liked Dad anyway and merely tolerated the rest of us when we were old enough.

    Fostering isn't going to work because I'd never be able to let them go.

    Well the spare bed will become one of the cat's beds and you don't need a huge amount of floor space for a cat tree.....
    Originally posted by paddypaws101
    Along with our bed and the sofa and the computer keyboards and the magazine you're reading... lol I love cats.

    We're renting so although the landlord is very laid back, I don't want to fix anything to the walls if we can help it. I'm working on height for the cat trees rather than width at the moment. Ideally I'd like to try and discourage them from jumping from the microwave shelf to the top of the extractor fan to try and get on top of the kitchen cupboards - the extractor fan hood is stainless steel and they'll slide right off!
    Last edited by DD265; 10-10-2016 at 11:18 AM.
    Barclaycard: £1795.61/£2907.26 - 38% paid
    MBNA: £2,613.57/£3866.92 - 32% paid
    • UKTigerlily
    • By UKTigerlily 12th Oct 16, 4:27 AM
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    UKTigerlily
    My cat tree is 6ft 3 & doesn't need fixing to the walls; i'm pretty sure even when they are adults it'll hold them ok. I think a second hand one would be fine so long as not too battered!

    I agree about older cats too, I just lost my 18 year old to CKD in July & she was the most incredible cat i've ever had, just wonderful x
    2015 weight loss: 86/100Ibs
    • Poppy3008
    • By Poppy3008 12th Oct 16, 1:17 PM
    • 54 Posts
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    Poppy3008
    My cat is now 11, we got her with her sister (now dead) age 3. In that time they moved house 5 times, one of those to Canada and back. Poppy has been very adjustable and when in Canada was a house cat but Shen is now living on a farm so we never see her! She is not keen on my husband but loves me! Her sister was more my husbands cat. We got a dog who she hates but has now stated to ignore. When she goes, I'll get an old moggie. Rescue cats are the best! And older ones less work than kittens. We had a massive cat tree - this one never used it but her sister loved it.
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