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    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 7th Oct 16, 3:49 PM
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    glasgowdan
    Help me identify hedge species please
    • #1
    • 7th Oct 16, 3:49 PM
    Help me identify hedge species please 7th Oct 16 at 3:49 PM
    I wonder if anyone can help me with ideas to plant a hedge that will end up looking similar to this one? I like the idea of cotoneaster, hornbeam and something quite light green/yellowish to stand out in clumps. Non-thorny ideally.

    Any thoughts?
Page 1
    • Justagardener
    • By Justagardener 7th Oct 16, 4:26 PM
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    Justagardener
    • #2
    • 7th Oct 16, 4:26 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Oct 16, 4:26 PM
    What about Griselinia littoralis, nice light evergreen makes a great thick hedge could be planted with laurel, viburnum tinus and prunus lusitanica. Cotoneaster can grow a bit spindly and leave gaps in the hedge in my experience
    • TheGardener
    • By TheGardener 7th Oct 16, 4:28 PM
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    TheGardener
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 16, 4:28 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 16, 4:28 PM
    Looks like a mixture of beech, privet or box and possibility Hawthorne (its hard to see past the first two) Try Lonicera for the golden bit
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 7th Oct 16, 5:32 PM
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    theonlywayisup
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 16, 5:32 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 16, 5:32 PM
    I cannot identify that one, but what about elaeagnus ebbingei. We had a hedge and it was soft (not prickly) fairly quick growing but not overrunning and the lovely white flowers smelled divine.
    "I suggest you read who's thread this is and you will find its MINE". sic
    • chipfire
    • By chipfire 11th Oct 16, 8:29 PM
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    chipfire
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 16, 8:29 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 16, 8:29 PM
    You can also grow your own from seed. Not quick but worth setting some off to fill gaps etc in time.

    I have had great success growing spindle. I have 20 nice plants all grown from seed which are now looking great in dirt cheap poly pots. They have just turned autumn red. Look for spindles bright pink berries now and they will be ready to harvest very soon. Instructions worked very well for me. I'm in my 3rd year of collecting and growing and planting out some lovely specimens.

    This link will help you identify your hedge and provides self growing advice.

    http://treegrowing.tcv.org.uk/grow/tree-recipes/spindle
    Last edited by chipfire; 11-10-2016 at 8:34 PM.
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 11th Oct 16, 9:00 PM
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    glasgowdan
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 16, 9:00 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 16, 9:00 PM
    Life's too short for hedge seeds
    • chipfire
    • By chipfire 11th Oct 16, 9:05 PM
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    chipfire
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 16, 9:05 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 16, 9:05 PM
    Life's too short for hedge seeds
    Originally posted by glasgowdan
    They grow themselves you know
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Oct 16, 8:39 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #8
    • 12th Oct 16, 8:39 AM
    • #8
    • 12th Oct 16, 8:39 AM
    Seed raised spindle is OK for use in a mixed hedge, but like its name, it's too spindly to have much impact on its own, unlike the named varieties that cost, grown as single specimens.

    Here I grow-on the hazels that squirrels plant for me in a nursery bed, and hawthorns too, but I agree with Dan that life's too short for establishing hedges from seed alone.

    A country field hedge is a very long-term job, far removed from the average garden, mainly because it's such a harsh environment, where replacement saplings must compete in a starved, raised area with existing trees. I put hazels in at 2' tall 3 years ago and they've barely made 3' yet!

    For gardens, not cut with a flail, I prefer more formal hedging of a single type, but if mixing evergreen and deciduous, I'd probably go for beech,green and purple, which holds its leaves and is dirt cheap.
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 12th Oct 16, 10:04 AM
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    glasgowdan
    • #9
    • 12th Oct 16, 10:04 AM
    • #9
    • 12th Oct 16, 10:04 AM
    This is where I need the hedge. There's also a road perpendicular to the main road just out of shot that faces right onto our house when cars are waiting to join the main Rd. You'll appreciate I'm not going to wait for seeds to grow!
    • chipfire
    • By chipfire 15th Oct 16, 6:39 AM
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    chipfire
    Plant bare roots now then
    Bare root hedges are the way to go. order a bundle of beech bare root plants now for delivery in November when they are dormant. Beech will keep its leaves in winter if clipped right.

    You need at 5 least a metre for a Double staggered row to make it solid.

    Life too short comments are hilarious as you are about 4 years away from a decent hedge......which is 2 years less than growing from seed!!

    I wasn't suggesting growing an entire hedge from seed, although I have done it.

    I grow all sorts of hedge plants and to add to existing hedges. It's as rewarding as any gardening or growing. Hedges grow faster than you think and it's satisfying to know you grew from seed, just as with other plants. You will get plant failures and will need to fill gaps.

    I mentioned spindle as they add welcome colour. The original post mentiond wanting a hedge with some stand out aspects. In autumn Red leaves and pink berries. Just random collected seed grew well, no need for nursery specimens. All look great. If pruned young they aren't spindley at all as someone Davesnave suggested. They are called spindle because the branches grow very
    straight so were used to make weaving spindles.

    Hazel growing slowly is unusual, perhaps the soil or position not suited. 2 year Hazel bare roots put in 2 years ago are now at 7ft and will be pollarded this winter.

    Good luck with the hedge!
    Last edited by chipfire; 15-10-2016 at 6:52 AM.
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 15th Oct 16, 7:51 AM
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    glasgowdan
    2 years is a significant amount of time!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 15th Oct 16, 8:08 AM
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    Davesnave

    Hazel growing slowly is unusual, perhaps the soil or position not suited. 2 year Hazel bare roots put in 2 years ago are now at 7ft and will be pollarded this winter.
    Originally posted by chipfire
    No, it's not unusual and it's exactly the same with all other species when one plants into an existing field hedge, which is what I said. Maybe you don't have field hedges. Here in Devon they are everywhere and they're usually raised well above the fields and roads, meaning they dry out very quickly.

    Spindle give good impact if allowed to grow into 4m high shrubs with plenty of room to spread, but I find mine don't compete so well in a hedge, so my comments were based on that. I never get the sort of results that they do in RHS Rosemoor, 10miles down the road.

    Your experience may vary. In any event, Dan will get much faster growth in that town plot, especially if he improves the soil first and waters in any dry spells in the first year or so

    PS. There are euonymus that are evergreen an weave nicely into a town hedge, but again, they'll be slow growing to start with. Specimens in a park near where I used to live were probably decades old.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 15-10-2016 at 8:58 AM.
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • chipfire
    • By chipfire 16th Oct 16, 8:46 PM
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    chipfire
    2 years is a significant amount of time!
    Originally posted by glasgowdan
    Bear in mind this is the MoneySaving Expert forum so cheap options are offered, not necessarily the quickest!
    Looking at your site you probably need an evergreen.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 17th Oct 16, 1:59 AM
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    Davesnave
    I agree that evergreen may be best if you are looking for privacy, but the hornbeam you mentioned and beech both hold onto leaves well when trimmed in summer. Among those, you could plant yellow privet and a few other shrubs, like escallonia, viburnum tinus or elaeagnus ebbingei, to give a bit of variation and move you away from the blandness of an all laurel or leylandii-type hedge.

    The main thing to watch out for in that situation will be schoolkids/drunks walking along the top of the wall, or sitting on it if it's by a bus stop, 'cos they never just stay on the wall!

    I use Buckingham Nurseries a lot. There are plenty of other on-line suppliers too. I've always had good service and cheaper plants buying on-line. Even if you buy elsewhere, Buckingham's on-line and paper catalogue is good for ideas, including native hedging with spindle trees included!:

    http://www.hedging.co.uk/acatalog/index.html
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 17th Oct 16, 7:26 AM
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    glasgowdan
    The stuff's all ordered, not a conifer in sight as I hate the things and spent a couple days removing a 20ft high row of them right along this wall!

    This is far too posh an area for drunks and rowdy kids! Locals drink red wine on their verandas and in their entertaining suites, and kids play tennis and rugby or play violin when they're not at school ��
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 17th Oct 16, 7:47 AM
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    Davesnave
    The stuff's all ordered, not a conifer in sight as I hate the things and spent a couple days removing a 20ft high row of them right along this wall!

    This is far too posh an area for drunks and rowdy kids! Locals drink red wine on their verandas and in their entertaining suites, and kids play tennis and rugby or play violin when they're not at school ��
    Originally posted by glasgowdan
    Good, but note that no one suggested conifers.

    I lived in an up-market area of Bath for over 30 years, but it was still an area which vulgar people traversed in order to reach their hovels when the pubs and clubs closed, so my hidden-away location was a great asset. You are on a through route.

    Do we get to hear what you chose?
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 17th Oct 16, 7:53 AM
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    glasgowdan
    We've been in and out of the house for 7 weeks now, no swaggering drunks as there are simply no bars around. There's a bypass a quarter miles away that sees to most of the through traffic, it's perfect.

    Went for purple beech, hornbeam, golden privet and normal privet and cotoneaster for't bees. Plus a few fruit trees to play with elsewhere ��
    • chipfire
    • By chipfire 17th Oct 16, 12:35 PM
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    chipfire
    Sounds great. Good luck.


    If you have any spare plants its worth potting them up as spares if (and when) a couple fail in the coming years.


    Get them in quick before someone guerrilla gardeners plant pansies!
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 17th Oct 16, 2:53 PM
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    glasgowdan
    Yep any spares will get popped in the back in a corner rather than pots (watering = time) but I think I'll just plant everything denser rather than allow spares. The whole border is going to get topped up with 500l compost and I might fashion a perforated hose come spring
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 20th Oct 16, 6:32 AM
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    Davesnave
    Postscript: Somewhat ironically, I discovered one of the spindle trees I rescued from a hedge and planted in some new woodland has berried-up properly for the first time this year, and it looks really good.

    It's only about 1.5m tall, so slower than the trees around, but there it has some space to do its thing.

    I might even be tempted to take a few seeds.....
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
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