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    • MSE Nick
    • By MSE Nick 7th Oct 16, 1:42 PM
    • 218Posts
    • 66Thanks
    MSE Nick
    Money Moral Dilemma: Should we increase our son's pocket money?
    • #1
    • 7th Oct 16, 1:42 PM
    Money Moral Dilemma: Should we increase our son's pocket money? 7th Oct 16 at 1:42 PM
    This week's MoneySaver who wants advice asks...

    Our son's been complaining he gets less pocket money than his friends. We've told him that if he wants more money he should get a part-time job; he says he's working hard for his GCSEs and so hasn't got the time. Should we relent or stand firm?

    Unfortunately the MSE team can't always answer money moral dilemma questions as contributions are often emailed in or suggested in person. They are intended to be enjoyed as a point of debate and discussed at face value.

    If you haven’t already, join the forum to reply!

    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
Page 3
    • woodville
    • By woodville 13th Oct 16, 10:12 PM
    • 9 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    woodville
    Understand the revising for exams issue and the difficulty of an under 16 getting a job. Get him to do some housework and pay him for that - hoovering, washing up, ironing, making beds and tidying rooms - all things that will stand him in good stead later in life.
    That is not going to compromise his exams and later on her will thank you - but probably not now!
    • barclaysbabe
    • By barclaysbabe 14th Oct 16, 1:16 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    barclaysbabe
    If he is studying hard for his GCSE and doesn't have time to work a part time job, what does he want the increase in pocket money for? Cant have it both ways!
    • crmism
    • By crmism 14th Oct 16, 5:42 PM
    • 32 Posts
    • 19 Thanks
    crmism
    Pocket Money
    It would help if you had said a). how old your son is, b). how much pocket money he's getting at the moment, and c). how much pocket money his friends are getting. Without such basic information, it's quite impossible to offer any ideas, so I'll assume that he doesn't have part-time employment weekdays/weekends.

    If he's old enough, then he could do what most other kids do and work a paper round, butcher's round, greengrocer's round. That's what I did when I was a youngster, and there's nothing wrong in being seen by his friends to work for his money. It will help him to learn its value, and that it doesn't fall off trees.

    Remember, pocket money has to be earned.
    • gingerdad
    • By gingerdad 14th Oct 16, 9:37 PM
    • 1,708 Posts
    • 1,265 Thanks
    gingerdad
    Part time job all the way and I say that as a parent of a year 11

    6 hours a week she gets £36.00 at 15 plus bonus if busy. It's teaching her great life skills will help when comes to building a career. And she can buy things she wants. Currently on for mostly a's / 8.


    And I really don't agree with paying for grades.
    The futures bright the future is Ginger
    • cheesetoast
    • By cheesetoast 14th Oct 16, 9:53 PM
    • 200 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    cheesetoast
    My son got his first job at ten. Yes, ten. It was a weekly paper round of the free newspaper delivering in our village. I walked the round with him every week (and of course the round was in my name)
    Originally posted by lisa110rry
    So you took on the job, and subcontracted to your son. Did you declare it on your own self-assessment tax return? Did you give your son a chance to join a workplace pension scheme? Or was he acting as self-employed? If so, did HE fill in a tax return?
    • WibblyGirly
    • By WibblyGirly 15th Oct 16, 7:38 AM
    • 68 Posts
    • 111 Thanks
    WibblyGirly
    I'm going to come at this slightly differently, Lets assume he's at school 6 hours a day so 30 hours a week. Has 2 hours of homework/revision each night so hes already at a 40hours week. Then he gets a part time job which could be 6 or 8 hours on sat/sun. Do people think its acceptable that a 15/16 year old has a near 50 hour work weeks? Thats probably more than his parents do if they both work full time.
    I'm at uni, work part time and do volunteer work to gain relevant work exp and I struggle, I haven't had a day off for a month now and I'm knackered. I'm 27 though and can probably handle it better than a child can.
    I'd advise offering extra for jobs around the house and then once his GCSEs are done to get a part time job. I had one at college and my college hours were less than high school (Day off in the week and a half day off)
    • scrabbly
    • By scrabbly 15th Oct 16, 4:16 PM
    • 34 Posts
    • 24 Thanks
    scrabbly
    I quite agree with previous post. If he has time to spend money - he has time to earn it !!!
    Nobody deserves something for nothing.
    • happyinflorida
    • By happyinflorida 15th Oct 16, 6:06 PM
    • 594 Posts
    • 517 Thanks
    happyinflorida
    Stop being such tightwads and give your son extra pocket money, in fact, because you've been so tight for so long, you should give him 100% extra just for being so tight for so long and so mean.

    Why did you have children?! Glad you're not my rotten parents.
    • happyinflorida
    • By happyinflorida 15th Oct 16, 6:10 PM
    • 594 Posts
    • 517 Thanks
    happyinflorida
    Part time job all the way and I say that as a parent of a year 11

    6 hours a week she gets £36.00 at 15 plus bonus if busy. It's teaching her great life skills will help when comes to building a career. And she can buy things she wants. Currently on for mostly a's / 8.


    And I really don't agree with paying for grades.
    Originally posted by gingerdad
    I really don't believe a word of this rubbish

    Down in the real world, a 15 year old wouldn't get a job because you have to be a minimum of 16 years old to get a job.

    Then when you hit 16 you would only be paid £2.50 per hour, not the ridiculous amount you're quoting.

    So shut up and just stick to the truth.
    • fabforty
    • By fabforty 15th Oct 16, 7:16 PM
    • 696 Posts
    • 2,953 Thanks
    fabforty
    It's impossible to answer this without knowing how much he gets and what it is supposed to cover, also how much you can afford. What his friends get is largely irrelevant if they have wealthy parents with a large disposable income and you are struggling to pay the bills.
    • gaving7095
    • By gaving7095 20th Oct 16, 8:52 AM
    • 109 Posts
    • 91 Thanks
    gaving7095
    Offering to pay him for his help with house & garden work I think is fair / best.
    If he gets a part time job he'll have to spend time & / or money travelling to it & probably be poorly-paid & treated like a skivvy anyway.
    • sulphate
    • By sulphate 22nd Oct 16, 9:50 PM
    • 946 Posts
    • 2,894 Thanks
    sulphate
    I'm going to come at this slightly differently, Lets assume he's at school 6 hours a day so 30 hours a week. Has 2 hours of homework/revision each night so hes already at a 40hours week. Then he gets a part time job which could be 6 or 8 hours on sat/sun. Do people think its acceptable that a 15/16 year old has a near 50 hour work weeks? Thats probably more than his parents do if they both work full time.
    I'm at uni, work part time and do volunteer work to gain relevant work exp and I struggle, I haven't had a day off for a month now and I'm knackered. I'm 27 though and can probably handle it better than a child can.
    I'd advise offering extra for jobs around the house and then once his GCSEs are done to get a part time job. I had one at college and my college hours were less than high school (Day off in the week and a half day off)
    Originally posted by WibblyGirly
    I agree with this and also the posts which highlight that a 15 year old will find it difficult to get work.

    I also think that those saying that they worked x amount of hours a week from when they were 13 and still managed to get all As have a poor argument. Some young people may be able to do that and still achieve very good grades but the less academically able may need to study longer hours to achieve good results.
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