Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • BrookesAndrew
    • By BrookesAndrew 7th Oct 16, 11:51 AM
    • 293Posts
    • 101Thanks
    BrookesAndrew
    50 minutes for a 10k (21 years old)
    • #1
    • 7th Oct 16, 11:51 AM
    50 minutes for a 10k (21 years old) 7th Oct 16 at 11:51 AM
    I did a 10k in 50 minutes the other day. The 10k was on roads and fields and had a few hills in it. I just want to know if this is a fairly decent time for a 10k?

    https://www.strava.com/activities/733329953
Page 1
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 7th Oct 16, 12:19 PM
    • 1,567 Posts
    • 3,770 Thanks
    MallyGirl
    • #2
    • 7th Oct 16, 12:19 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Oct 16, 12:19 PM
    It sounds pretty good to me but I am no expert, and it is a long time since I was 21!!!
    I am sticking with 5k parkruns at the moment but the range for completion there is 16 mins through to 55 mins so 25 mins sounds good.
    • cr1mson
    • By cr1mson 7th Oct 16, 4:37 PM
    • 717 Posts
    • 530 Thanks
    cr1mson
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 16, 4:37 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 16, 4:37 PM
    Are you male or female?

    If you are male then that would give you a WAVA score of 53.91% if you are female 60.67%. WAVA is calculated as a percentage of the best time for someone your age and sex has run so allows you to compare across age and gender.

    HTH.
    • indesisiv
    • By indesisiv 7th Oct 16, 6:40 PM
    • 3,688 Posts
    • 12,958 Thanks
    indesisiv
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 16, 6:40 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 16, 6:40 PM
    A good calculator for age grade scores is http://www.runnersworld.com/tools/age-grade-calculator
    “Time is intended to be spent, not saved” - Alfred Wainwright
    • SG27
    • By SG27 7th Oct 16, 8:17 PM
    • 1,844 Posts
    • 1,141 Thanks
    SG27
    • #5
    • 7th Oct 16, 8:17 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Oct 16, 8:17 PM
    How often do you run? I think my first ever 10km was about 57 munutes. After about 8 months doing one or two runs week i had it down to 45minutes. Overall id say 50 minutes is pretty good.
    Mortgage Debt: £93,537.48/£105,025 Feb 13
    Overpayments so far: £3,939.72
    • BrookesAndrew
    • By BrookesAndrew 10th Oct 16, 10:30 AM
    • 293 Posts
    • 101 Thanks
    BrookesAndrew
    • #6
    • 10th Oct 16, 10:30 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Oct 16, 10:30 AM
    How often do you run? I think my first ever 10km was about 57 munutes. After about 8 months doing one or two runs week i had it down to 45minutes. Overall id say 50 minutes is pretty good.
    Originally posted by SG27
    That was only my second 10k I had ever done. I really want to go to a track and do a 10k round a running track. Wow, 45 minutes that is really good
    • indesisiv
    • By indesisiv 10th Oct 16, 12:55 PM
    • 3,688 Posts
    • 12,958 Thanks
    indesisiv
    • #7
    • 10th Oct 16, 12:55 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Oct 16, 12:55 PM
    That was only my second 10k I had ever done. I really want to go to a track and do a 10k round a running track. Wow, 45 minutes that is really good
    Originally posted by BrookesAndrew
    Wow, 10k round a track takes some concentration.

    Do you have a local track? Find out which clubs train there or if you can just drop down. Then go do it.

    One of our local clubs regularly hosts races on their track, not sure how you qualify for the races I'll be honest. But I did notice that they held an invitational event the other week with limited places for "amateurs" to enter.
    Last edited by indesisiv; 10-10-2016 at 9:54 PM.
    “Time is intended to be spent, not saved” - Alfred Wainwright
    • 1393jason
    • By 1393jason 10th Oct 16, 9:10 PM
    • 12 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    1393jason
    • #8
    • 10th Oct 16, 9:10 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Oct 16, 9:10 PM
    The big 10k milestones for runners are sub 60mins for a beginner, sub 40min for a good club runner and sub 35 national standard and under 30 you will probably be running internationally.

    I wouldnt worry about if its agood time or not and instead focus on the journey, the process and pushing yourself.
    • andygb
    • By andygb 11th Oct 16, 2:15 PM
    • 11,023 Posts
    • 22,947 Thanks
    andygb
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 2:15 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 2:15 PM
    The big 10k milestones for runners are sub 60mins for a beginner, sub 40min for a good club runner and sub 35 national standard and under 30 you will probably be running internationally.

    I wouldnt worry about if its agood time or not and instead focus on the journey, the process and pushing yourself.
    Originally posted by 1393jason

    Back in the eighties, I could do 16m 50s for 5000 metres on a track, 35m 24s 10000 and 10 miles on the road regularly under 60 minutes.
    I was nowhere near national standard and I didn't belong to a club or train specifically for running.
    • indesisiv
    • By indesisiv 11th Oct 16, 2:24 PM
    • 3,688 Posts
    • 12,958 Thanks
    indesisiv
    Back in the eighties, I could do 16m 50s for 5000 metres on a track, 35m 24s 10000 and 10 miles on the road regularly under 60 minutes.
    I was nowhere near national standard and I didn't belong to a club or train specifically for running.
    Originally posted by andygb
    16:50 would get you in the top 2 or 3 of a local race.
    Just looking at a 5k that i know had a fairly good field (Doncaster 5k) that would have put you 33rd.
    For me thats a bloody good time though much faster than I could dream of going.

    Its a cracking pace.

    5k's are a lot more popular than they used to be with the invent of parkrun's where people can go out and practice racing.
    Last edited by indesisiv; 11-10-2016 at 2:26 PM.
    “Time is intended to be spent, not saved” - Alfred Wainwright
    • andygb
    • By andygb 11th Oct 16, 5:58 PM
    • 11,023 Posts
    • 22,947 Thanks
    andygb
    16:50 would get you in the top 2 or 3 of a local race.
    Just looking at a 5k that i know had a fairly good field (Doncaster 5k) that would have put you 33rd.
    For me thats a bloody good time though much faster than I could dream of going.

    Its a cracking pace.

    5k's are a lot more popular than they used to be with the invent of parkrun's where people can go out and practice racing.
    Originally posted by indesisiv
    Thanks, I did the 5K and 10K on a local cinder track. The 10 mile runs were on a couple of local cycle race 10 mile time trial courses on A roads, so they were accurate distances.
    The race practice is one of the things which would have helped me, but I was using the running to help my general fitness for county league badminton, which it did.
    To get quicker at distance running, you don't just run further in training, you have to combine the miles with serious interval/sprint training.
    For example, go and warm up for ten minutes, then do five 20 second, flat out sprints with a ninety second recovery period in between. Then do a five minute easy jog and try doing the intervals again.
    Although a beginner will get gradually faster by getting the body used to running.
    The other important thing for any athlete/fun runner to remember, is to warm up before exercise and cool down and stretch after exercise.
    Dynamic stretching before - lunges, start jumps, arm whirls, knee lifts - this warms up the body in readiness for exercise.
    Static stretching after - quads, hams, calves, obliques - this stretches out the muscles after exercise, helping to dissipate lactic acid, thus reducing the risk of DOMS - delayed onset of muscle soreness, which can occur 12 - 72 hours after exercise.
    • indesisiv
    • By indesisiv 11th Oct 16, 6:47 PM
    • 3,688 Posts
    • 12,958 Thanks
    indesisiv
    To get quicker at distance running, you don't just run further in training, you have to combine the miles with serious interval/sprint training.
    For example, go and warm up for ten minutes, then do five 20 second, flat out sprints with a ninety second recovery period in between. Then do a five minute easy jog and try doing the intervals again.
    Although a beginner will get gradually faster by getting the body used to running.
    Originally posted by andygb
    Yep, best way to go. Mix up the training a bit.

    I normally do speed work Monday (intervals, hills fartlek etc), Gentle 3 miles or so recovery on tues, 6 miles wed (either fartlek, tempo run or just a run depending on how I'm feeling)
    Thurs I play badminton, Fri is always a rest day. Sat normally 5k (parkrun) as speed work , sun long run 10-15 miles or so, at a gentle pace...

    Will have to start moving more to marathon training in the new year though. But want to go sub 20 for 5k before then hopefully, only need to find 6 secs.
    “Time is intended to be spent, not saved” - Alfred Wainwright
    • 1393jason
    • By 1393jason 11th Oct 16, 10:07 PM
    • 12 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    1393jason
    Andy when I say sub 35 10k would be national standard what I mean is you can rock up to most local races and be fairly confident of finishing very close to the winner.
    • 1393jason
    • By 1393jason 11th Oct 16, 10:10 PM
    • 12 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    1393jason
    16:50 would get you in the top 2 or 3 of a local race.
    Just looking at a 5k that i know had a fairly good field (Doncaster 5k) that would have put you 33rd.
    For me thats a bloody good time though much faster than I could dream of going.

    Its a cracking pace.

    5k's are a lot more popular than they used to be with the invent of parkrun's where people can go out and practice racing.
    Originally posted by indesisiv
    Is Doncaster your local parkrun? I usually go and do it when I am back home visiting parents in Donny.

    Gets a big boggy in winter.
    • indesisiv
    • By indesisiv 12th Oct 16, 8:25 AM
    • 3,688 Posts
    • 12,958 Thanks
    indesisiv
    Is Doncaster your local parkrun? I usually go and do it when I am back home visiting parents in Donny.

    Gets a big boggy in winter.
    Originally posted by 1393jason
    No doncaster is a good way away from me. They just host a 5k race thats at a good standard around the town centre.
    “Time is intended to be spent, not saved” - Alfred Wainwright
    • 1393jason
    • By 1393jason 12th Oct 16, 9:53 AM
    • 12 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    1393jason
    No doncaster is a good way away from me. They just host a 5k race thats at a good standard around the town centre.
    Originally posted by indesisiv
    Sorry I misread your post. Yes the Doncaster 5k is a very good standard race. Always fancied giving it a go but I can never make the dates fit as it's a bit of a trek from Cornwall.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,724Posts Today

8,460Users online

Martin's Twitter