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  • FIRST POST
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 5th Oct 16, 10:52 PM
    • 27,768Posts
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    DCFC79
    Asking previous employer for old job back
    • #1
    • 5th Oct 16, 10:52 PM
    Asking previous employer for old job back 5th Oct 16 at 10:52 PM
    Pretty much as the title says, has anyone left Job A for Job B found out after a month or 2 Job B wasn't for you and you asked if you could get your old job back ?

    Did you make the decision lightly or give it alot of thought ?

    How was your return taken by your fellow colleagues ?

    Im in the situation as the job title and to be honest the job isnt for me, id like to go back to previous employer but am concerned Id be considered a failure for going back.

    I left for a job I thought would be something different which it is but Ive come to realise some aspects of the job aren't for me and as im new I cant exactly ask I avoid these aspects of the job, well I could but id be told where to go.
    Je Suis Charlie
Page 1
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 6th Oct 16, 7:58 AM
    • 2,650 Posts
    • 2,562 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 16, 7:58 AM
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 16, 7:58 AM
    First question is whether you feel you have really given the new job long enough to be sure of the decision that it's not for you? Most jobs have elements to them that we don't particularly enjoy.
    If you are certain that you don't want to stay then you really have nothing to lose by contacting your previous boss. It could be argued that you are actually taking positive action in acknowledging your mistake in leaving in the first place.
    • Ozzuk
    • By Ozzuk 6th Oct 16, 8:06 AM
    • 839 Posts
    • 1,281 Thanks
    Ozzuk
    • #3
    • 6th Oct 16, 8:06 AM
    • #3
    • 6th Oct 16, 8:06 AM
    Has your old employer filled your position? Even if they did take you back you've likely lost any continuation of service which could impact the salary level they offer and pension status. Not to mention lack of security as a 'new starter'.

    Unless you have contacts at the old company that will welcome you back I'd probably stick with it and if necessary look for a new job in a few months. Won't look great on your CV though.
    • SandC
    • By SandC 6th Oct 16, 8:54 AM
    • 3,731 Posts
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    SandC
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 16, 8:54 AM
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 16, 8:54 AM
    Depends very much on your relationship with your previous employer, if the position hasn't been filled I don't see why you shouldn't ask the question. I don't think anyone would consider you any kind of failure! You don't seem to be too concerned about whether they would have you back so I presume you left on very good terms.

    I work with a lady who's been here for many years, she left for a while then returned. No problem whatsoever, the company were glad to welcome her back.
    • YouAsked
    • By YouAsked 6th Oct 16, 10:22 AM
    • 95 Posts
    • 105 Thanks
    YouAsked
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 16, 10:22 AM
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 16, 10:22 AM
    Personally I wouldn't - but not because I shouldn't but because I'd let my embarrsssment rule me!

    I know someone who did do this - and ended up in a bidding war!
    realised after 2 days job B wasn't for them,
    went back to job A and told them they'd be prepared to come back to a higher grade - job A agreed,
    handed notice in at job B
    job B gave some assurances about how things would develop so retracted notice
    Contacted job A, they offered even bigger promotion
    Went back to job A.
    Still there now - 15 years later

    My nerves were shredded while all of this negotation was going on - thinking they'd end up with no job at all, but it worked out.

    I will add though there was a bit of background there where job A had passed them over for promotion then asked they they train the person promoted and I think job A realised they'd made a mistake and it would take time/effort to replace those skills.

    So generally speaking I'd say if you left on good terms and they haven't filled the vacancy there's every chance they might be glad of the opportunity to save on recruitment effort/costs. If you've got particulalry marketable skills/expertise then this will make it more likely.

    No guarantees though and some employers will have very rigid policies where no matter how much they "liked" you, there is still a process which has to be followed.

    Regarding colleagues...I genuinely don't think many people would care. Thinking about it, people I've worded with have come and gone and come again (sometimes with short gaps, sometime years later) and no-one seems to bat an eyelid. But this is probably related to how well thought of you were when you left!
    • cmthephoenix
    • By cmthephoenix 6th Oct 16, 11:26 AM
    • 29 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    cmthephoenix
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 16, 11:26 AM
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 16, 11:26 AM
    Pretty much as the title says, has anyone left Job A for Job B found out after a month or 2 Job B wasn't for you and you asked if you could get your old job back ?

    Did you make the decision lightly or give it alot of thought ?

    How was your return taken by your fellow colleagues ?

    Im in the situation as the job title and to be honest the job isnt for me, id like to go back to previous employer but am concerned Id be considered a failure for going back.

    I left for a job I thought would be something different which it is but Ive come to realise some aspects of the job aren't for me and as im new I cant exactly ask I avoid these aspects of the job, well I could but id be told where to go.
    Originally posted by DCFC79

    My employer loves to take good people back providing there is a role for them. It doesn't matter in the slightest to colleagues - they're normally relieved to get a trained person back.


    We all know the grass greener rules.


    And my employer can then say to people thinking of leaving, please consider it carefully because x left and then within a couple of months they were back.
    • w00519772
    • By w00519772 6th Oct 16, 11:51 AM
    • 1,053 Posts
    • 187 Thanks
    w00519772
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 16, 11:51 AM
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 16, 11:51 AM
    If you were a valued member of staff and the position is unfilled, then I would talk to your line manager. Do you have his/her email address/contact number? Are you friends/contacts on Facebook/LinkedIn? The worse they can say is no.

    I have seen this happen before. Some people are embarrassed by it, however I think that moving jobs is a stressful experience and does not always work out, so I sympathise with you. I am no expert though - just my opinion. Good luck.
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 6th Oct 16, 2:05 PM
    • 2,447 Posts
    • 1,253 Thanks
    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 16, 2:05 PM
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 16, 2:05 PM
    Did you make the decision lightly or give it alot of thought ?

    How was your return taken by your fellow colleagues ?

    Im in the situation as the job title and to be honest the job isnt for me, id like to go back to previous employer but am concerned Id be considered a failure .[/QUOTE]

    Depends how you got on with colleagues.?

    If your old boss would call you up before re-advertising - there is your indicator. But that maybe isn't the issue.

    My heart skipped a beat after I only days ago saw a prev position readvertised only took 4 months but I could never return due to co workers still being very much the same.
    Patience is a necessary ingredient of genius
    • bugslet
    • By bugslet 6th Oct 16, 3:15 PM
    • 4,520 Posts
    • 23,522 Thanks
    bugslet
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 16, 3:15 PM
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 16, 3:15 PM
    My employer loves to take good people back providing there is a role for them. It doesn't matter in the slightest to colleagues - they're normally relieved to get a trained person back.


    We all know the grass greener rules.


    And my employer can then say to people thinking of leaving, please consider it carefully because x left and then within a couple of months they were back.
    Originally posted by cmthephoenix
    ^^^ This.

    We have taken people back on if we hadn't replaced them and it's no big deal.

    I'm talking from employer perspective not having done it myself. If your old company is looking for someone, far better they get someone they know and saves all that adverising and recruitment effort and money.
    • Undervalued
    • By Undervalued 6th Oct 16, 5:30 PM
    • 2,086 Posts
    • 1,776 Thanks
    Undervalued
    From the employer's point of view it means they get a known commodity with the "benefit" of their employment rights having been reset to zero!

    That said I certainly know of some employers who would seldom or never re-employ as a matter of policy. They take the view that employee has shown a lack of loyalty and indicated that they would really prefer to work elsewhere.
    • ThemeOne
    • By ThemeOne 6th Oct 16, 5:55 PM
    • 694 Posts
    • 540 Thanks
    ThemeOne
    This happened to me, but a long time ago now, and both jobs were long-term agency placements.

    I went to job B which didn't work out - in fact my services were dispensed with (I only put it that was only because you can't technically fire an agency worker). The supervisor at job A then phoned me and said he'd heard things didn't work out and did I want to come back. Although I didn't really want to, there was nothing else much in the offing so come back I did.

    It worked out well enough - I don't think anyone was much bothered by what I'd done, and second time around job A actually worked out fairly well.
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 6th Oct 16, 7:14 PM
    • 4,852 Posts
    • 6,365 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    As others have said, it depends on a lot of factors.

    From an employer's perspective, there are positives:
    - An employee who is already familiar with the job, and the internal systems and therefore should need no / minimal training
    - no agency fees
    -someone whose skills, strengths and weaknesses are known

    On the down-side
    - someone who has already chosen to leave, once. You'd have to wonder whether they were going to stay, or whether they would simply be using it as a short term solution while looking for a new job. (Which might not be a major issue, depending on the job)
    - THey already know any flaws, weaknesses and poor relationships with other staff

    You'd also need to bear in mind that if they did take you back, it wouldn't necessarily be on the same terms. People may have been promoted or given different duties following your departure and you wouldn't necessarily have exactly the same role or responsibilities afterwards.

    Al that said,it doesn't hurt to make enquiries, and judge by what the response is.
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 6th Oct 16, 10:32 PM
    • 1,723 Posts
    • 3,647 Thanks
    gettingtheresometime
    Pretty much as the title says, has anyone left Job A for Job B found out after a month or 2 Job B wasn't for you and you asked if you could get your old job back ?

    Did you make the decision lightly or give it alot of thought ?

    How was your return taken by your fellow colleagues ?

    Im in the situation as the job title and to be honest the job isnt for me, id like to go back to previous employer but am concerned Id be considered a failure for going back.

    I left for a job I thought would be something different which it is but Ive come to realise some aspects of the job aren't for me and as im new I cant exactly ask I avoid these aspects of the job, well I could but id be told where to go.
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    I left a job with a company to go elsewhere but I too hated it and after a year, left to go back in a slightly different role.

    I realised that the old adage the ex is an ex for a reason is true, even though I was welcomed with open arms and left last month.
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC cleared thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 7th Oct 16, 9:06 AM
    • 4,852 Posts
    • 6,365 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    Another point to think about is why you left in the first place? Is it something which is likely to mean you'll be unhappy or dissatisfied again if you were to return?
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 12th Oct 16, 8:04 PM
    • 27,768 Posts
    • 17,532 Thanks
    DCFC79
    Another point to think about is why you left in the first place? Is it something which is likely to mean you'll be unhappy or dissatisfied again if you were to return?
    Originally posted by TBagpuss
    Apologies for the late reply.

    Id left as I wanted a challenge, the hours were part time but I was offered overtime and something different BUT I'm beginning to realise I miss working as a team, maybe part of it is because we all got on really well.
    Last edited by DCFC79; 12-10-2016 at 8:20 PM.
    Je Suis Charlie
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 12th Oct 16, 8:12 PM
    • 27,768 Posts
    • 17,532 Thanks
    DCFC79
    Has your old employer filled your position? Even if they did take you back you've likely lost any continuation of service which could impact the salary level they offer and pension status. Not to mention lack of security as a 'new starter'.

    Unless you have contacts at the old company that will welcome you back I'd probably stick with it and if necessary look for a new job in a few months. Won't look great on your CV though.
    Originally posted by Ozzuk
    Ive broached the subject if it were possible, not much point in thinking if its possible IF its not possible. if the hours are no good then I probably wont consider it.

    Yes there is that about my CV, I'm currently looking for other jobs.

    Depends very much on your relationship with your previous employer, if the position hasn't been filled I don't see why you shouldn't ask the question. I don't think anyone would consider you any kind of failure! You don't seem to be too concerned about whether they would have you back so I presume you left on very good terms.

    I work with a lady who's been here for many years, she left for a while then returned. No problem whatsoever, the company were glad to welcome her back.
    Originally posted by SandC
    Ive been told they would be happy to have me back plus its Christmas which will be busy. Yes we left on good terms, I was a good colleague, knew what I was doing.

    Personally I wouldn't - but not because I shouldn't but because I'd let my embarrsssment rule me!

    I know someone who did do this - and ended up in a bidding war!
    realised after 2 days job B wasn't for them,
    went back to job A and told them they'd be prepared to come back to a higher grade - job A agreed,
    handed notice in at job B
    job B gave some assurances about how things would develop so retracted notice
    Contacted job A, they offered even bigger promotion
    Went back to job A.
    Still there now - 15 years later

    My nerves were shredded while all of this negotation was going on - thinking they'd end up with no job at all, but it worked out.

    I will add though there was a bit of background there where job A had passed them over for promotion then asked they they train the person promoted and I think job A realised they'd made a mistake and it would take time/effort to replace those skills.

    So generally speaking I'd say if you left on good terms and they haven't filled the vacancy there's every chance they might be glad of the opportunity to save on recruitment effort/costs. If you've got particulalry marketable skills/expertise then this will make it more likely.

    No guarantees though and some employers will have very rigid policies where no matter how much they "liked" you, there is still a process which has to be followed.

    Regarding colleagues...I genuinely don't think many people would care. Thinking about it, people I've worded with have come and gone and come again (sometimes with short gaps, sometime years later) and no-one seems to bat an eyelid. But this is probably related to how well thought of you were when you left!
    Originally posted by YouAsked
    As Ive said I have asked the question if I could come back and the new manager will be asked maybe tomorrow or friday. If the answer is no then I can put it out my mind.

    It would be more of a backup if I don't get anywhere with applying for jobs.
    Last edited by DCFC79; 12-10-2016 at 8:21 PM.
    Je Suis Charlie
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 12th Oct 16, 8:17 PM
    • 27,768 Posts
    • 17,532 Thanks
    DCFC79
    If you were a valued member of staff and the position is unfilled, then I would talk to your line manager. Do you have his/her email address/contact number? Are you friends/contacts on Facebook/LinkedIn? The worse they can say is no.

    I have seen this happen before. Some people are embarrassed by it, however I think that moving jobs is a stressful experience and does not always work out, so I sympathise with you. I am no expert though - just my opinion. Good luck.
    Originally posted by w00519772
    Still undecided really, im currently working and getting paid for full time hours which is good but its the job satisfaction that isn't there.


    Depends how you got on with colleagues.?

    If your old boss would call you up before re-advertising - there is your indicator. But that maybe isn't the issue.

    My heart skipped a beat after I only days ago saw a prev position readvertised only took 4 months but I could never return due to co workers still being very much the same.
    Originally posted by keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    While I was in the current job they had a new manager come in so wouldn't have met him yet.

    ^^^ This.

    We have taken people back on if we hadn't replaced them and it's no big deal.

    I'm talking from employer perspective not having done it myself. If your old company is looking for someone, far better they get someone they know and saves all that adverising and recruitment effort and money.
    Originally posted by bugslet
    Thanks
    Je Suis Charlie
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 12th Oct 16, 9:40 PM
    • 1,723 Posts
    • 3,647 Thanks
    gettingtheresometime
    Apologies for the late reply.

    Id left as I wanted a challenge, the hours were part time but I was offered overtime and something different BUT I'm beginning to realise I miss working as a team, maybe part of it is because we all got on really well.
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    Be careful about going back even more then.

    Dynamics change with new staff members coming into the team even if you get on with them, especially when the boss has changed
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC cleared thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge
    • ScarletMarble
    • By ScarletMarble 12th Oct 16, 10:45 PM
    • 5,511 Posts
    • 10,269 Thanks
    ScarletMarble
    My Dad had a new job and he hated it so much that he asked his former employer would he be able to return back. He did return back and because he left employer A to go to B and back to A in the same month, he didn't bother putting that job on his CV.

    Though did screw up the taxes as was issued a P45 twice in one month etc. Got the rebate back/
    Rejoined Slimming World 28/7/16
    Lost 2st 2lb first time Need to lose that again
    Lost 10lb 1st 6lb to go
    • bluesnake
    • By bluesnake 13th Oct 16, 12:04 PM
    • 1,270 Posts
    • 604 Thanks
    bluesnake
    I feel you can never go back to the exact same job. Have seen it where the company tell all that 'Mr X could not make it and he is possibly better than you' to keep exiting staff in line. He was also reminded to always feel grateful, and that the company had done him a favour where nowhere else even wanted him. Not the best place to work for.

    I have seen it done successfully where people have left for a year, gained added experience/knowledge and come back, often to an elevated position.

    The question is, why you left in the first place. Often money is not the only factor, and many stay in a job even if there is a substantial difference.

    Generally, and if you are on the younger/middle age side, everyone who I know that has left has over time done better than those who stayed, even if they experienced redundancies and joblessness.
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