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    • Maggie Bob
    • By Maggie Bob 4th Oct 16, 11:11 AM
    • 269Posts
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    Maggie Bob
    Kittens, Vet and no car
    • #1
    • 4th Oct 16, 11:11 AM
    Kittens, Vet and no car 4th Oct 16 at 11:11 AM
    So we're getting two kittens in a couple of weeks (pictures to come!)


    We don't have a car (I'm learning to drive, we'll get there). Our nearest vet is less than a mile away, and it's not a distance I would give a second thought to walking, but...


    Am I being naïve thinking we can walk that with the kittens in carriers? I know every cat is a different temperament etc, but in general? Anyone else carry their cat to the vet?
    In a better financial position than ever before (thank you MSE!). Moved back to Scotland and now trying to keep debt-free!
Page 1
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 4th Oct 16, 11:48 AM
    • 4,867 Posts
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    TBagpuss
    • #2
    • 4th Oct 16, 11:48 AM
    • #2
    • 4th Oct 16, 11:48 AM
    It depends on the cats and how distressed they get.

    If they are upset then walking means that they are going to be distressed for longer, so in that case, it might be kinder to get a taxi so that the amount of time involved is less.

    BEar in mind that if you are carrying them then the motion won't be very smooth - I've found withh all of my cas that they mind more about the bits a the start and end of a trip when I'm carrying them than the bits in between when we're in the car - I think it is harder for them to keep their balance, and more disorientating, so more stressful for them.

    Maybe trying carrying them short distances round the house in the carrier to see how they react, first?
    • Maggie Bob
    • By Maggie Bob 4th Oct 16, 11:55 AM
    • 269 Posts
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    Maggie Bob
    • #3
    • 4th Oct 16, 11:55 AM
    • #3
    • 4th Oct 16, 11:55 AM
    Thanks Bagpuss - I did wonder about doing a 'trial run' by carrying them about the house a bit. Now I'm starting to understand why 'crazy cat ladies' have a pram with their cats in it! We can get a taxi, or there's even a local bus service to right outside the vets (once we know how they do with being out and about in their carrier)


    Hopefully I'll be able to judge their temperament from getting them home (my sister is driving us for that one) and being around them for a while. Eek!
    In a better financial position than ever before (thank you MSE!). Moved back to Scotland and now trying to keep debt-free!
    • SensibleSarah
    • By SensibleSarah 4th Oct 16, 1:15 PM
    • 147 Posts
    • 174 Thanks
    SensibleSarah
    • #4
    • 4th Oct 16, 1:15 PM
    • #4
    • 4th Oct 16, 1:15 PM
    I didn't have a car until I'd had cats for years. It was a couple of miles to my vet back then and believe me, those kittens get heavy after a while

    Mine didn't get particularly stressed being carried that way, in fact they whinge much more when I take them in the car now! Obviously the most important thing is making sure your carrier is secure - worst nightmare for it to come apart when walking through a strange area etc.

    I got a taxi a couple of times with them, but one of mine used to get car sick and so scared in the car he pooped himself - the smell didn't please the taxi driver very much! He was much less stressed being carried by me walking with the carrier.
    • missbiggles1
    • By missbiggles1 4th Oct 16, 1:27 PM
    • 15,810 Posts
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    missbiggles1
    • #5
    • 4th Oct 16, 1:27 PM
    • #5
    • 4th Oct 16, 1:27 PM
    You can get cat carriers with wheels, which might help.
    • Spider In The Bath
    • By Spider In The Bath 4th Oct 16, 1:46 PM
    • 780 Posts
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    Spider In The Bath
    • #6
    • 4th Oct 16, 1:46 PM
    • #6
    • 4th Oct 16, 1:46 PM
    You can get cat carriers with wheels, which might help.
    Originally posted by missbiggles1
    Or one with a strap.

    We have one that is canvas and mesh and has a shoulder strap. I have mobility problems and so I can throw the bag strap over my shoulder, hold the handle on the top with one hand and hold the bag close to my body with the other hand. This stops the case from bouncing about (I worry about being thrown of balance by the cat moving around).

    We have something like this:

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ME-MY-PORTABLE-FABRIC-FOLDING-PET-CAGE-CARRIER-FOR-CAT-DOG-RABBIT-PUPPY-KENNEL-/330867128518
    • Maggie Bob
    • By Maggie Bob 4th Oct 16, 4:53 PM
    • 269 Posts
    • 1,054 Thanks
    Maggie Bob
    • #7
    • 4th Oct 16, 4:53 PM
    • #7
    • 4th Oct 16, 4:53 PM
    You've all reassured me so much - thank you! We've got a good carrier with a shoulder strap (to be upgraded to two carriers very soon once they're too big), so we'll see how we go carrying them around home in that and then to the vet if they're not fazed by it.
    In a better financial position than ever before (thank you MSE!). Moved back to Scotland and now trying to keep debt-free!
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 4th Oct 16, 7:59 PM
    • 21,283 Posts
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    • #8
    • 4th Oct 16, 7:59 PM
    • #8
    • 4th Oct 16, 7:59 PM
    You've all reassured me so much - thank you! We've got a good carrier with a shoulder strap (to be upgraded to two carriers very soon once they're too big), so we'll see how we go carrying them around home in that and then to the vet if they're not fazed by it.
    Originally posted by Maggie Bob
    Bear in mind that a lot of cats complain loudly about such expeditions, no matter how long, short or comfortable they are. I avoided the abject horror my first cats expressed at such indignities with the Idiot Cat by leaving the carrier in a corner with a blanket in, so he associated it with somewhere snug for sleep - when it came to his Expeditions of Doom, he was merely perturbed by his nice little house being carried outside, so whilst he was still distinctly unimpressed by the softly spoken lady sticking pointy things in him and up him , he viewed the house as the one safe bit of the whole experience. He just hunkers down and glares at the world for the walk - other than when a loose dog in the waiting room decided to say hello. Then the loose dog found out that sticking his nose into the grille meant it got walloped with five pointy cat bits.

    Compare it to the previous occupants, one of whom howled and wailed every moment of his confinement, much to the amusement of the kids on the same bus on their way to school - he shut up when the kids started wailing back at him and giggling.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • Bluebell1000
    • By Bluebell1000 4th Oct 16, 8:42 PM
    • 639 Posts
    • 1,877 Thanks
    Bluebell1000
    • #9
    • 4th Oct 16, 8:42 PM
    • #9
    • 4th Oct 16, 8:42 PM
    We put our cat carrier into the buggy for vet trips. One of our cats gets very upset with car journeys, but does't mind being pushed along quite as much!
    DS1 born 21/1/12
    DS2 born 10/9/14
    • Maggie Bob
    • By Maggie Bob 4th Oct 16, 9:59 PM
    • 269 Posts
    • 1,054 Thanks
    Maggie Bob
    Bear in mind that a lot of cats complain loudly about such expeditions, no matter how long, short or comfortable they are. I avoided the abject horror my first cats expressed at such indignities with the Idiot Cat by leaving the carrier in a corner with a blanket in, so he associated it with somewhere snug for sleep - when it came to his Expeditions of Doom, he was merely perturbed by his nice little house being carried outside, so whilst he was still distinctly unimpressed by the softly spoken lady sticking pointy things in him and up him , he viewed the house as the one safe bit of the whole experience. He just hunkers down and glares at the world for the walk - other than when a loose dog in the waiting room decided to say hello. Then the loose dog found out that sticking his nose into the grille meant it got walloped with five pointy cat bits.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    That poor loose dog though!

    Yup, the plan is to have the carrier as a fixture in the house, just another bed/hidey hole for them
    In a better financial position than ever before (thank you MSE!). Moved back to Scotland and now trying to keep debt-free!
    • purple12
    • By purple12 12th Oct 16, 7:47 PM
    • 277 Posts
    • 360 Thanks
    purple12
    Bit late but we didn't have a car when we got our cat (he was a kitten - now he's grown) and I walked to the vet with him in the carrier for the first and second inoculations and once when he was sick (all before he was about 9 months old though when we did get a car!). He didn't seem terribly troubled by the walk (about 15 mins each way). I put a blanket and some treats in there as well as a toy. But he dozed. It would be more difficult now as he's much heavier but if I had to, I would.
    • chocdonuty
    • By chocdonuty 13th Oct 16, 9:12 AM
    • 912 Posts
    • 1,004 Thanks
    chocdonuty
    I have this problem, taxi's have been the solution for me, although some can be a bit funny about cats in the car so best to call up in advance.
    My local vets are all about a 25 minutes walk away from home but the one I go to I can go halfway on the bus which is fine for a guinea pig but a fully grown cat I would have difficulty.
    It's not so much the weight its just that they are so awkward to carry, and I don't think a backpack or harness and lead would be tolerated!
    I keep meaning to buy a pushchair, one of the cheapy ones so at least I could wheel them to the vets if needed.
    Hiya, I'm single mom, avid moneysaver and freecycler, sometimes but definatly
    • gettingready
    • By gettingready 13th Oct 16, 5:58 PM
    • 10,535 Posts
    • 15,839 Thanks
    gettingready
    I have 4 boys. 3 are absolutely fine being taken out in a carrier but Fred is having a heart attack every time I try to get him to the vets.

    He pants like a dog, foams at the mouth, his eyes enlarge to double normal size and he screams the whole way there and back.

    He is a nightmare with carriers and generally a freak though- anyone new coming in Fred hides under the duvet. He is my boy and ONLY my boy.
    • Maggie Bob
    • By Maggie Bob 14th Oct 16, 12:33 PM
    • 269 Posts
    • 1,054 Thanks
    Maggie Bob
    I've got a wonderful picture of walking the two kittens to the vet on a lead. Somehow I don't think I would be their favourite human if I tried to do that!


    We pick them up tomorrow - expect lots of questions and photos in the future
    In a better financial position than ever before (thank you MSE!). Moved back to Scotland and now trying to keep debt-free!
    • Lily-Rose
    • By Lily-Rose 15th Oct 16, 10:43 AM
    • 2,104 Posts
    • 6,694 Thanks
    Lily-Rose
    You can get cat carriers with wheels, which might help.
    Originally posted by missbiggles1
    Didn't know that!

    That would be handy as for me, as even carrying them from the car to the vet where I live is a 5 minute walk. May look for carriers with wheels soon.

    Bear in mind that a lot of cats complain loudly about such expeditions, no matter how long, short or comfortable they are. I avoided the abject horror my first cats expressed at such indignities with the Idiot Cat by leaving the carrier in a corner with a blanket in, so he associated it with somewhere snug for sleep - when it came to his Expeditions of Doom, he was merely perturbed by his nice little house being carried outside, so whilst he was still distinctly unimpressed by the softly spoken lady sticking pointy things in him and up him , he viewed the house as the one safe bit of the whole experience. He just hunkers down and glares at the world for the walk - other than when a loose dog in the waiting room decided to say hello. Then the loose dog found out that sticking his nose into the grille meant it got walloped with five pointy cat bits.

    Compare it to the previous occupants, one of whom howled and wailed every moment of his confinement, much to the amusement of the kids on the same bus on their way to school - he shut up when the kids started wailing back at him and giggling.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    Yep true. Some cats simply loathe being in the little carrier and will cry and howl and make odd noises!

    Personally if I were you Maggie Bob, I would get a taxi and wouldn't walk. As someone said above ^ those cats will get heavy very quickly!
    Proud to have lost over 3 stone (45 pounds,) in the past year! Now a size 14!

    Slave to 2 mad cats.

    Next time you point a finger; I'll point you to the mirror
    .
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