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  • FIRST POST
    • needhouseadvice
    • By needhouseadvice 3rd Oct 16, 10:57 AM
    • 76Posts
    • 19Thanks
    needhouseadvice
    How to get over buyer's remorse?
    • #1
    • 3rd Oct 16, 10:57 AM
    How to get over buyer's remorse? 3rd Oct 16 at 10:57 AM
    I have a severe case of buyer's remorse after completing and it's stopping me from enjoying my flat and the experience of living on my own for the first time. I'm questioning everything about it even what I saw as its good points before I bought it and all the (many) compromises that I made to buy in London. Now I'm just not sure it was worth it and I should've waited for something better to come along.

    How do I get over this? It's affecting my daily life. I can't concentrate at work. I just feel like there's so much to do and it's getting me down. I just wish I was back in my old rental where I didn't have to think about all of this.
Page 4
    • needhouseadvice
    • By needhouseadvice 8th Oct 16, 10:49 AM
    • 76 Posts
    • 19 Thanks
    needhouseadvice
    It's good to know from reading this thread that this is a common problem. I always thought it was just me that felt odd after moving but it seems it's quite common. I definitely recommend exploring the local area as mentioned in the previous answer. Nothing makes me feel better than just going out for a walk. I never started walking much until I lived alone but it gets you out, gives you time to think and I always feel better after returning home.
    Originally posted by Mortgage Moog
    i've been on the internet a lot and there are SO MANY people who regret buying soon after they complete. glad i'm not the only one. it's an expensive lesson to always trust yourself and to compromise but not so much that you end up resenting the flat.
    • Mortgage Moog
    • By Mortgage Moog 8th Oct 16, 3:19 PM
    • 142 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    Mortgage Moog
    i've been on the internet a lot and there are SO MANY people who regret buying soon after they complete. glad i'm not the only one. it's an expensive lesson to always trust yourself and to compromise but not so much that you end up resenting the flat.
    Originally posted by needhouseadvice
    I bet those same people will be smiling in 5 to 25 years time though once they've moved to a bigger place or paid off their mortgage. There's a lot of biting the bullet involved when buying but over the years you'll reap the rewards.
    Last edited by Mortgage Moog; 08-10-2016 at 4:48 PM.
    • staffie1
    • By staffie1 8th Oct 16, 5:13 PM
    • 1,591 Posts
    • 1,272 Thanks
    staffie1
    I felt the same and at times it drives my anxiety up the wall.

    Thin walls, I can hear everything going on in my 1905 terrace, I naively thought the walls would be thicker with the age of the property.
    Originally posted by Moonhead

    I can relate to this! It doesn't matter how many times you view a house before you buy it - you won't know what it's like to live there until you're in.


    I do what others have suggested - pick out all the positives and focus on them. After nearly 2 years I've got used to the thin walls problem in my 1930's semi. I think myself fortunate that my neighbours are nice people but just loud and clumsy in everything they do.


    I know I will never settle here however, but it won't be long at all now when I can move on, and use the experience to choose a more suitable place to live.
    If you will the end, you must will the means
    • Mortgage Moog
    • By Mortgage Moog 8th Oct 16, 6:54 PM
    • 142 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    Mortgage Moog
    Luckily the walls are very thick in my place, over 12 inches of concrete. You can never hear what people are saying and even if someone shouts it's only just audible.
    • moonbeamglitter
    • By moonbeamglitter 8th Oct 16, 7:52 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    moonbeamglitter
    Walthamstow is really up and coming and close to some great areas. Due to the great transport in London, you'll be able to move around easily to the areas you like to be in and you'll also find new haunts in Walthamstow.
    • e13
    • By e13 9th Oct 16, 9:18 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 26 Thanks
    e13
    you managed to get a new kitchen for £600?! how??? sounds like you moved in at a very stressful time in your life. hope your exams went well. definitely the right decision to be close to your family.
    Originally posted by needhouseadvice

    Yeah, it should have been earlier, but the purchase dragged on and on!

    Answer - it's a pretty small kitchen - a galley type one! I got most of the appliances second hand, and I'd had to buy a cooker for day one so that wasn't included in the £600 B&Q spend.

    Me and Dad just went and bought cupboards, and carcasses. We looked at various luxury ones, but in the end just got the basic drawers etc, and bought soft close hinges and things separately. The work top is solid wood (but block made rather than single slab), but we just did all the work ourselves - everything from cutting the worktop to size and taking the wood out for the sink, to replumbing and fitting a new light.

    I'm feeling much more settled now, and exam results are on Friday, so I'm gonna keep my fingers crossed!
    • Mortgage Moog
    • By Mortgage Moog 9th Oct 16, 4:49 PM
    • 142 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    Mortgage Moog
    Might i venture to say. You're just lonely.
    Originally posted by marksoton
    I think this is a very underestimated reply. Although I love being on my own and have been around the world on my own, even I get a bit bored living alone. It's so different knowing that someone else is in the house.

    There is one point I don't quite get about this thread. You say that you're only 15/20 minute walk from the area you used to live in so you can only be about a mile away. Surely it can't be that different just a mile up the road?
    • needhouseadvice
    • By needhouseadvice 9th Oct 16, 7:21 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 19 Thanks
    needhouseadvice
    I think this is a very underestimated reply. Although I love being on my own and have been around the world on my own, even I get a bit bored living alone. It's so different knowing that someone else is in the house.

    There is one point I don't quite get about this thread. You say that you're only 15/20 minute walk from the area you used to live in so you can only be about a mile away. Surely it can't be that different just a mile up the road?
    Originally posted by Mortgage Moog
    No, I'm a 15/20 min walk from Walthamstow. I'm at the far end. The area I used to live in is around 40 mins away now. If only I was just up the road. The transport links from here are quite decent.
    • needhouseadvice
    • By needhouseadvice 9th Oct 16, 7:22 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 19 Thanks
    needhouseadvice
    Yeah, it should have been earlier, but the purchase dragged on and on!

    Answer - it's a pretty small kitchen - a galley type one! I got most of the appliances second hand, and I'd had to buy a cooker for day one so that wasn't included in the £600 B&Q spend.

    Me and Dad just went and bought cupboards, and carcasses. We looked at various luxury ones, but in the end just got the basic drawers etc, and bought soft close hinges and things separately. The work top is solid wood (but block made rather than single slab), but we just did all the work ourselves - everything from cutting the worktop to size and taking the wood out for the sink, to replumbing and fitting a new light.

    I'm feeling much more settled now, and exam results are on Friday, so I'm gonna keep my fingers crossed!
    Originally posted by e13
    Still, that's an impressive price. I need a new kitchen - need to pay a visit to B&Q!
    • Mortgage Moog
    • By Mortgage Moog 9th Oct 16, 7:55 PM
    • 142 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    Mortgage Moog
    No, I'm a 15/20 min walk from Walthamstow. I'm at the far end. The area I used to live in is around 40 mins away now. If only I was just up the road. The transport links from here are quite decent.
    Originally posted by needhouseadvice
    I see. Well a 40 minute walk is still quite close, unless you mean a 40 minute drive. I'm not familiar with the area.
    • Planet Switzerland
    • By Planet Switzerland 9th Oct 16, 9:01 PM
    • 57 Posts
    • 35 Thanks
    Planet Switzerland
    I haven't got over the line yet with buying my property but can relate to what you're saying.


    I live in a pretty dull area of north west London. I chose the area several years ago because of price and its quite well connected to central London and at the moment in my rental property I'm only a 5 minute walk from the tube station.


    The place I'm trying to buy is a good 20 minute walk from the station and prices have gone up at lot in the time I've been here, though still cheaper than the more exciting areas.


    I do question what's the point in buying in an area with the appeal of its connection to central London when its going to take me 20 minutes to just get to the tube station. On the other hand, there isn't anywhere to buy that's as close to the station as where I'm living at the moment, plus for a few years now my quality of life has been affected by my stress of not being on the property ladder yet and puts my 5 minute walk from the tube station into insignificance.


    I guess most people buy a bit of a dump for their first property, particularly in London. At least if I start paying off the mortgage on this property it will bring me closer to owning somewhere nicer. If I carried on renting that nice property would be getting further and further away.
    • Mortgage Moog
    • By Mortgage Moog 10th Oct 16, 7:50 AM
    • 142 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    Mortgage Moog
    Planet Switzerland, I look at the place I'm in now (my first bought property) as a stepping stone. It's great and I would be happy to stay here for 2 or 3 years if needed but I wouldn't want to settle in this area forever.

    It is a big jump to get on the ladder and although you can't expect too much for your first place I wouldn't set your standards too low. I only viewed two places in person but looked at many online. The difference between the one I was going to buy and the one I ended up buying was huge!

    The first place looked great at first and was closer to where I wanted to be but then on the second viewing the bathroom had leaked, I found out it had a lot of land I didn't know about that was in very bad condition with weeds and grass that hadn't been cut for years. Music started thumping from next door...I'm so glad I didn't buy that place!

    There's always going to be some sacrifice but that doesn't mean you have to settle for a dump. The way I look at it is that wherever you live you're always going to have to travel somewhere. You might be further from the tube but you'll be close to some other things, or further away from work which can be nice to help relax and not feel so close to work all the time.
    • Planet Switzerland
    • By Planet Switzerland 10th Oct 16, 9:35 PM
    • 57 Posts
    • 35 Thanks
    Planet Switzerland
    Ok I may have been a bit melodramatic when I said a dump. Most first time buyers in London buy a one bed and its hard to get that excited about a property that size. Likewise many places in the outer parts of London are a bit dull but the appeal is the close proximity to Central London rather than the area itself. I did view several properties and it took over a year to find this one, but it is my stepping stone to buying somewhere bigger and nearer the tube station in a few years time.
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 11th Oct 16, 3:01 PM
    • 2,927 Posts
    • 1,688 Thanks
    Crashy Time
    Ok I may have been a bit melodramatic when I said a dump. Most first time buyers in London buy a one bed and its hard to get that excited about a property that size. Likewise many places in the outer parts of London are a bit dull but the appeal is the close proximity to Central London rather than the area itself. I did view several properties and it took over a year to find this one, but it is my stepping stone to buying somewhere bigger and nearer the tube station in a few years time.
    Originally posted by Planet Switzerland


    London really is paved with gold! With such lofty aspiration only a few YEARS and mega-buckets of debt away how can anyone think that the serfs of London will one day stand up and say "Enough"!
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