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  • FIRST POST
    • G_M
    • By G_M 28th Sep 16, 7:04 PM
    • 37,092Posts
    • 41,049Thanks
    G_M
    solid fuel Rayburn.
    • #1
    • 28th Sep 16, 7:04 PM
    solid fuel Rayburn. 28th Sep 16 at 7:04 PM
    Have found a property where heating and hot water come from a solid fuel Rayburn..

    I assume this means coal/coke or similar and my initial reaction is not too keen on endlessly carry coal indoors to feed it and presumably cleaning it out too. Is this how it would work? In the 21st century?

    This seems to be a newly installed (probobly expensive?) feature - why on earth not oil (no gas available)? Or some renewable even?

    Looks like it's for cooking too.

    Could one re-use pipework etc and replace with an oil boiler oil, or have to start from scratch? Cost?
Page 1
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 28th Sep 16, 11:09 PM
    • 26,079 Posts
    • 12,542 Thanks
    Cardew
    • #2
    • 28th Sep 16, 11:09 PM
    • #2
    • 28th Sep 16, 11:09 PM
    There have been several threads on Aga/Rayburn; the consensus, even using oil/gas/electricity, is that the disadvantages outweigh any advantages; in essence they are a 'lifestyle' choice.

    At least with oil/gas/electricity they don't involve much work. Not so solid fuel - read the link below(and weep):

    http://www.rayburn-web.co.uk/Prodin/Rayburn%20current%20products/Rayburn%20355SFW/Rayburn%20355SFW%20user%2010-09%20EOPI%20515579.pdf
    • G_M
    • By G_M 29th Sep 16, 2:48 PM
    • 37,092 Posts
    • 41,049 Thanks
    G_M
    • #3
    • 29th Sep 16, 2:48 PM
    • #3
    • 29th Sep 16, 2:48 PM
    Thanks - pretty much what I thought. Seems balmy to put one of these into a new renovation.

    If I end up buying, I'd have to budget to replace it/ Anyone know if the existing rads and pipework could be kept or would whole house need re-plumbing?
    • iris
    • By iris 29th Sep 16, 3:41 PM
    • 1,019 Posts
    • 3,185 Thanks
    iris
    • #4
    • 29th Sep 16, 3:41 PM
    • #4
    • 29th Sep 16, 3:41 PM
    We bought an old cottage many years ago and had the solid fuel Rayburn converted to oil.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 29th Sep 16, 10:43 PM
    • 37,092 Posts
    • 41,049 Thanks
    G_M
    • #5
    • 29th Sep 16, 10:43 PM
    • #5
    • 29th Sep 16, 10:43 PM
    We bought an old cottage many years ago and had the solid fuel Rayburn converted to oil.
    Originally posted by iris
    Thanks. What did that involve?
    • wrightk
    • By wrightk 30th Sep 16, 6:26 AM
    • 928 Posts
    • 511 Thanks
    wrightk
    • #6
    • 30th Sep 16, 6:26 AM
    • #6
    • 30th Sep 16, 6:26 AM
    I have a multi fuel stove in situ which provides hot water and heating to 8 radiators. I'd swap tomorrow for a rayburn, due to the additional option of cooking. I would never ever have an oil one- both rayburn and aga eat oil.These stoves are designed for continuous burning throughout winter, being designed to essentially never be off. Yes the instructions are daunting but similar instructions can be found for any woodburning or multi fuel stove, once you get the hang of it you'll be loading it up once a day, riddling once or twice a day and emptying once a day. In return youll have plenty of hot water and heating whenever you need it.

    I wouldnt describe a rayburn as a lifestyle choice- that is reserved for those with oil fired agas and standalone woodburners and especially for someone like me who lives in an area with no access to oil deliveries or mains gas, they are designed to be workhorses.

    The most important thing is getting someone out and checking its connected to a properly functioning and safe hot water and heating system, something which the vast majority of plumbers haven't got a clue
    Even a stopped clock tells the right time twice a day, and for once I'm inclined to believe Withnail is right. We are indeed drifting into the arena of the unwell.
    • peat
    • By peat 30th Sep 16, 6:51 AM
    • 469 Posts
    • 94 Thanks
    peat
    • #7
    • 30th Sep 16, 6:51 AM
    • #7
    • 30th Sep 16, 6:51 AM
    This may be worth considering, now eligible for RHI payments

    http://www.argyllwoodfuels.com/reviews/pelletstove-klover.php
    • iris
    • By iris 30th Sep 16, 5:01 PM
    • 1,019 Posts
    • 3,185 Thanks
    iris
    • #8
    • 30th Sep 16, 5:01 PM
    • #8
    • 30th Sep 16, 5:01 PM
    Thanks. What did that involve?
    Originally posted by G_M


    We had an oil tank installed outside and then the oil was gravity fed along the outside wall and then into the kitchen and then to the Rayburn (through the back of the cupboards in our case). Wicks were installed where the solid fuel was burned and hey presto we were ready to go. IIRC the cost was not too high.


    We were very pleased with the end result and the Rayburn was a lot easier to control temperature-wise than when it was solid fuel.


    Just remember what you have put in the oven to cook, as there is no smell - I once put some potatoes to roast in the oven and forgot about them, only to open the oven door next day to what looked like lumps of coal
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 11th Oct 16, 7:56 AM
    • 20,856 Posts
    • 83,768 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 7:56 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 7:56 AM
    I've just ripped-out a converted Aga system like the one iris describes above.

    It was a nice-to-have feature in our kitchen/diner, but not very efficient. It's nicer to have the extra space instead, rather than the duplication involved in having both winter & summer cookers.
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • G_M
    • By G_M 12th Oct 16, 12:07 AM
    • 37,092 Posts
    • 41,049 Thanks
    G_M
    Well the house went under offer so I'l be staying put a bit longer. But after readig the replies I'm convinced:

    These stoves are designed for continuous burning throughout winter, being designed to essentially never be off.
    so if you go away for a week or 3?

    Yes the instructions are daunting but similar instructions can be found for any woodburning or multi fuel stove, once you get the hang of it you'll be loading it up once a day, riddling once or twice a day and emptying once a day.


    How would I ever find the time to post on the forum?

    If i come across one of these again, I'll rip it out, install a straightforward oil boiler and use leccy to cook.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Oct 16, 7:41 AM
    • 20,856 Posts
    • 83,768 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Well the house went under offer so I'l be staying put a bit longer. But after readig the replies I'm convinced:

    so if you go away for a week or 3?



    How would I ever find the time to post on the forum?

    If i come across one of these again, I'll rip it out, install a straightforward oil boiler and use leccy to cook.
    Originally posted by G_M
    With our oil Aga we'd book the postman around mid-November and he'd turn up after his rounds, clean the lines,install a new wick and light her up. It cost £35.

    Of course, we could have employed a heating engineer at around £65, but they wouldn't have been able to impart so much local information.

    The Aga then stayed on continuously until around the time of the first swallow in early April.

    Some people couldn't manage this routine, as their Agas would clog-up and start to smell, or go out after a couple of months, but we never had any bother.
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
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