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  • FIRST POST
    • SingleMaltWhisky
    • By SingleMaltWhisky 22nd Sep 16, 7:38 PM
    • 20Posts
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    SingleMaltWhisky
    Experiences with Non-Standard Construction Houses?
    • #1
    • 22nd Sep 16, 7:38 PM
    Experiences with Non-Standard Construction Houses? 22nd Sep 16 at 7:38 PM
    Hi,


    Has anyone here got experience with buying or repairing non-standard construction/PRC houses?


    We've had an offer accepted on a house we like but don't love and the vendors are moving frustratingly slowly. We've been keeping an eye on new listings and since a quick purchase has now gone out of the window we're considering cheaper 'wrecks and projects'.


    A PRC house (Wates semi-detached) has been reduced to a point where house price + repairs = do-able and I'm seriously tempted. Once the work was done it would give us much more house for our money and it's a big corner plot too...


    We're looking at 39-46k for repairs, 2-3 months of work and although it's unmortgageable in it's current state (we're cash buyers), I confirmed with a couple of valuers today that Halifax and a few other major lenders would lend on this kind of house once works were completed and certified. Looking at sales of already repaired houses in the area we'd recoup the cost of repairs in any resale.


    I'd love to hear from anyone who's done repairs like this or looked into doing them. Are there any pros or cons I might have missed?
Page 1
    • marksoton
    • By marksoton 22nd Sep 16, 7:41 PM
    • 15,814 Posts
    • 35,431 Thanks
    marksoton
    • #2
    • 22nd Sep 16, 7:41 PM
    • #2
    • 22nd Sep 16, 7:41 PM
    Are you going to project manage yourself?
    I'm an idiot troll. Apparently...
    • SingleMaltWhisky
    • By SingleMaltWhisky 22nd Sep 16, 8:14 PM
    • 20 Posts
    • 33 Thanks
    SingleMaltWhisky
    • #3
    • 22nd Sep 16, 8:14 PM
    • #3
    • 22nd Sep 16, 8:14 PM
    I'd assumed that the homeowner usually did in these situations, liaising with the repairs company?

    I'm a freelancer who can get away with working at odd hours or cramming work on the weekend so I was thinking it'd be a hectic couple of months of juggling everything followed by a month of sleeping it all off.
    • SingleMaltWhisky
    • By SingleMaltWhisky 23rd Sep 16, 11:52 AM
    • 20 Posts
    • 33 Thanks
    SingleMaltWhisky
    • #4
    • 23rd Sep 16, 11:52 AM
    • #4
    • 23rd Sep 16, 11:52 AM
    I realise this is a niche question but I'll bump it just in case anyone has any experience to share.


    I swear, show me a hundred properties and I will always light up at the one weird project rather than the 99 nice magnolia'd just-need-a-new-something ones. Ugh.
    • HouseBuyer77
    • By HouseBuyer77 23rd Sep 16, 2:44 PM
    • 636 Posts
    • 574 Thanks
    HouseBuyer77
    • #5
    • 23rd Sep 16, 2:44 PM
    • #5
    • 23rd Sep 16, 2:44 PM
    No direct experience with such things but do ensure you've got a plan for finance if it runs over budget.

    Where are you planning on living during the renovations? Even if it's possible to live in the property whilst repairs are on-going it might not be very nice and it will make things more difficult.

    Be prepared for time overun as well. Perhaps you'd be happy in a fixed caravan in the garden for a few months. But if those few months turn into a year and you've got winter/christmas in that caravan you may not be so keen.
    • SingleMaltWhisky
    • By SingleMaltWhisky 24th Sep 16, 12:02 PM
    • 20 Posts
    • 33 Thanks
    SingleMaltWhisky
    • #6
    • 24th Sep 16, 12:02 PM
    • #6
    • 24th Sep 16, 12:02 PM
    Good point HouseBuyer77.


    I was told it's possible to try and stay completely in the property while the works are done 'but anyone sane would try to avoid it'.


    We're renting a place at the moment though and there's no huge rush to leave. I was thinking we could leave the new house empty of any furnishings and I could then spend days on site but yoyo between camping overnight there to watch over it and staying at the rented place for hot showers etc and to get out of the workmens' way when they're doing the upstairs rooms.
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