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  • FIRST POST
    • Predaleko1984
    • By Predaleko1984 22nd Sep 16, 7:25 PM
    • 189Posts
    • 156Thanks
    Predaleko1984
    Had NHS Interview - unsuccessful Is it really that hard to get in the NHS + find work
    • #1
    • 22nd Sep 16, 7:25 PM
    Had NHS Interview - unsuccessful Is it really that hard to get in the NHS + find work 22nd Sep 16 at 7:25 PM
    I finally had my first interview in a while going for a post at the major hospital in our region. Granted I was nervous, and have a cold so I sounded rather croaky, I didn't get the job. I know I stuffed up a bit on the first question, but felt I built momentum and turned it around at the end.

    They went for someone who had NHS experience. I felt a bit cheated, as it seemed the interview was like a glorified internal selection. Why advertise to the public if you're not going to train someone up who wants a chance?

    I'm just getting nowhere with finding work. I'm sick of being in the temp trap, I'm sick of going for temp positions that get filled quicker than I can run for the bus and with this Brexit crap going on it's going to be hard. I want to move near my Mum, but can't afford it unless I don't eat and pay bills for a month or two, as it's not a nice area where I am and the flat is too cold in winter.

    I don't really want some job in a business that could potentially go under due to us leaving the EU. I know the NHS is tough to get into (and under-threat from the powers that be), but I just want a new challenge.

    Is it really that hard? What do you suggest?
Page 3
    • Retrievermomma31
    • By Retrievermomma31 27th Sep 16, 4:21 PM
    • 19 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    Retrievermomma31
    The NHS is an awful company to work for please for god's sake, if you are successful, don't stay for long.
    That place is the most demoralising, unproffesional, bureaucratic dump I've ever worked in.
    The managers are significantly underqualified and, it seems, as long as you know someone who works in a particular department, you will get the job no matter how many more efficient and qualified people are against you.
    So it's easy to work your way up if you don't care about patient safety or have any morals.

    Before working here I had barely had a sick day, and a couple of years in I had a breakdown and was off sick for 6 months. Yes, I was a higher band than band 2, but some would say it's worse, in some respects, as a band 2.
    Trust me you don't want to work here.
    Leaving this place was the best thing I've ever done.

    Sorry for the negative rant I just would hate for someone to go through what so many NHS workers go through!
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    • Dizzy Ditzy
    • By Dizzy Ditzy 27th Sep 16, 9:14 PM
    • 16,413 Posts
    • 277,935 Thanks
    Dizzy Ditzy
    The NHS is an awful company to work for please for god's sake, if you are successful, don't stay for long.
    That place is the most demoralising, unproffesional, bureaucratic dump I've ever worked in.
    The managers are significantly underqualified and, it seems, as long as you know someone who works in a particular department, you will get the job no matter how many more efficient and qualified people are against you.
    So it's easy to work your way up if you don't care about patient safety or have any morals.

    Before working here I had barely had a sick day, and a couple of years in I had a breakdown and was off sick for 6 months. Yes, I was a higher band than band 2, but some would say it's worse, in some respects, as a band 2.
    Trust me you don't want to work here.
    Leaving this place was the best thing I've ever done.

    Sorry for the negative rant I just would hate for someone to go through what so many NHS workers go through!
    Originally posted by Retrievermomma31
    There's a good reason I got out too. I went to a different trust and it was worse - they stole my B3 from me, leaving me to do three people's work by myself. I handed in my notice and didn't see it out because it was making me ill. That's how I know just how bad it is at that particular trust, along with the accounts of a lot of my friends

    The amount of abuse from certain patients because we couldn't offer them the service that they, and we wanted to offer

    I'm much, much happier where I am now.

    Having said that, I worked at both trusts the OP is referring to and would definitely recommend one over the other in terms of working environment and staff morale. The other seems to want to drive all their staff away and not replace them, spreading the workload onto other, already way overworked staff

    If it weren't for the goodwill of the staff, the NHS would have been ash a long, long time ago.
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    • Polarbeary
    • By Polarbeary 29th Sep 16, 4:52 PM
    • 250 Posts
    • 132 Thanks
    Polarbeary
    I used to be a band 4 medical secretary...but now in that particular Trust, all new med secs are band 3s and a band 4 is a senior med sec! They also have band 2 audio typists although in a few years they won't have any audio typists and fewer med secs as they want to automate all dictation. Many Trusts have already outsourced dictation to India and the Philippines...

    Outpatient clerks are being reduced too at one of my local hospitals. Many desks are now unmanned or only have one clerk per shift and patients check themselves in for clinic.

    Nursing staff and allied healthcare professions are not immune. I've read and heard that the plan is to reduce / downgrade staff (many specialist nurses have been downgraded from a 6/7 to a 5) and the future of the NHS is going to be mainly band 4 assistant practitioners doing the work of band 5s now.

    For example, one band 5 staff nurse per shift to co-ordinate and do the drugs, trained band 4s doing what nurses do, supported by a couple of band 2/3 HCAs.

    It's happening in other areas too - band 2/3/4 therapy assistants, clinician assistants and assistant practitioners. Cheaper than registered staff.

    There is also an increase in the number of apprentice administrator jobs that pay £130 a week! They hire you for a year, you get an NVQ Level 2 out of it (I did a free one via Vision2Learn which is government funded) and I imagine at the end of the year they wave you bye bye and get a new apprentice in.
    Last edited by Polarbeary; 29-09-2016 at 5:41 PM.
    • Predaleko1984
    • By Predaleko1984 30th Sep 16, 12:37 PM
    • 189 Posts
    • 156 Thanks
    Predaleko1984
    Can you be any age to be an apprentice or is it just aimed to the kids? Sad we're in a cheap labour mentality.

    I didn't attend the bank admin job interview, as I've spent most of the week in bed with a vicious cold. Could barely speak!

    I am feeling annoyed at the moment as I'm sick of agencies asking me to come in, be on their books and no jobs. I'm feeling mega annoyed at the fact the job near where I want to live, they didn't shortlist me! The company over-seeing the position said to go for a care job - er, I was a full-time carer for my ex until his death, and that was hard. Plus I'm not fit enough.

    Just sick of the humiliating signing on every fortnight. Started to think where I am living now is holding me back - just wish I had enough money to move, unless there is a deposit scheme somewhere?
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 30th Sep 16, 12:46 PM
    • 14,477 Posts
    • 14,167 Thanks
    Guest101
    The NHS is an awful company to work for please for god's sake, if you are successful, don't stay for long.
    That place is the most demoralising, unproffesional, bureaucratic dump I've ever worked in.
    The managers are significantly underqualified and, it seems, as long as you know someone who works in a particular department, you will get the job no matter how many more efficient and qualified people are against you.
    So it's easy to work your way up if you don't care about patient safety or have any morals.

    Before working here I had barely had a sick day, and a couple of years in I had a breakdown and was off sick for 6 months. Yes, I was a higher band than band 2, but some would say it's worse, in some respects, as a band 2.
    Trust me you don't want to work here.
    Leaving this place was the best thing I've ever done.

    Sorry for the negative rant I just would hate for someone to go through what so many NHS workers go through!
    Originally posted by Retrievermomma31
    1.4m people work for the NHS, yours is not a typical experience
    • t0rt0ise
    • By t0rt0ise 30th Sep 16, 1:04 PM
    • 2,880 Posts
    • 1,764 Thanks
    t0rt0ise
    I was very happy working for the NHS, not all departments are bad. I left because I wanted to give up full-time work but it's something I would have stayed in if I could.


    The OP will never get a job in the NHS if they don't attend interviews!
    • WolfSong2000
    • By WolfSong2000 30th Sep 16, 9:09 PM
    • 1,635 Posts
    • 1,933 Thanks
    WolfSong2000
    I am a contractor so work across different NHS Trusts...they're all very different in the way they operate (at least the ones I have worked at). 2 were absolutely horrific and nearly drove me to a nervous breakdown, others have been "okay".

    At current place, the team I work with is fantastic - lovely group of people, but my workload is horrific (I am a band 7 non-clinical covering the workload of 3-4 people on my own) and my manager is never on site and rarely responds to emails. It is stressful.
    • LannieDuck
    • By LannieDuck 2nd Oct 16, 5:17 PM
    • 2,275 Posts
    • 6,962 Thanks
    LannieDuck
    Did you ask for feedback from your interview?

    NHS interviews tend to be similar in style. If you do a couple, you'll get a feel for the type of questions you'll be asked, and can have answers prepared. If there's an internal candidate, it'll be more difficult because they're likely to have very relevant experience. However, it's not a fait accompli - i've been on an NHS interview panel where an external candidate was chosen over an internal.

    If you're giving up after one interview, you may not be the sort of person they're looking for.
    Last edited by LannieDuck; 02-10-2016 at 5:20 PM.
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    • dawyldthing
    • By dawyldthing 2nd Oct 16, 11:44 PM
    • 2,433 Posts
    • 1,412 Thanks
    dawyldthing
    If you're wanting to move is it a council property? As if the property is too big they often offer grants to move or if not and you have family in the area you want to go get on their list as if you have family in the area you'll get a higher banding.

    Work wise register with cv library and reed. I had a number of phone calls from them. Support work might be good too as I know you said no care work but support work is generally getting people out and about in the community. There's an increase in jobs and if you send your cv ad hoc to a lot you might get your foot in the door
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    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 3rd Oct 16, 12:03 AM
    • 9,772 Posts
    • 23,799 Thanks
    suki1964
    Can you be any age to be an apprentice or is it just aimed to the kids? Sad we're in a cheap labour mentality.

    I didn't attend the bank admin job interview, as I've spent most of the week in bed with a vicious cold. Could barely speak!

    I am feeling annoyed at the moment as I'm sick of agencies asking me to come in, be on their books and no jobs. I'm feeling mega annoyed at the fact the job near where I want to live, they didn't shortlist me! The company over-seeing the position said to go for a care job - er, I was a full-time carer for my ex until his death, and that was hard. Plus I'm not fit enough.

    Just sick of the humiliating signing on every fortnight. Started to think where I am living now is holding me back - just wish I had enough money to move, unless there is a deposit scheme somewhere?
    Originally posted by Predaleko1984
    Seriously, you spent nearly a week in bed with a cold?

    Seriously?

    You had an interview

    You are ' desperate' for a job

    But you let a cold stop you attending an interview


    You never heard of a pharmacy , day nurse, lemsip, throat lozenges?


    Seriously if I wanted a job so much I'd have walked over hot coals to ensure I got to the interview
    • raiiiraiii
    • By raiiiraiii 14th Jul 17, 6:59 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    raiiiraiii
    NHS Interview Advice
    Hi,

    I'm 17 years of age and a 6th form student -currently studying science A Levels.

    I have recently received an offer to come to an interview for the position of a medical records administer at a local NHS hospital. The interview is on the 21/07 (next friday).

    It's my first ever formal interview which would take place face-to-face (I've had other interviews via video conferencing).

    I'm pretty nervous -is there any advice which you could give me?

    What type of questions will I be asked?
    What will happen on the day?

    I've had lots of previous NHS experience under well-known senior consultants and their teams (2 clinical placements and 1 administrative placement).

    I've been offered jobs and interviews of different job sectors, however, this is a position which I would really love to take up. I really want the job!

    I've also been placed on a reserve candidate interview list for another role within the NHS which deals with blood donation. Could someone explain what this means in a bit of detail?

    All advice and tips welcome.
    Thanks
    Last edited by raiiiraiii; 14-07-2017 at 7:09 PM.
    • aife
    • By aife 14th Jul 17, 7:37 PM
    • 88 Posts
    • 62 Thanks
    aife
    When you say you've been 'invited' for an interview is that because you applied , or did a contact from your placements arrange it informally ?
    If you applied , I'm wondering why you're going for admin. jobs after studying science
    What exactly did your placements involve ? Were they clinical in nature ?
    Is the job at the hospital you were at ?
    If it is , and you liked the place , great
    If not you might want to think a bit more about what you really want
    .Of course it all depends how desperately you need a job , but you're young enough to have time and options. And as other people have already said , some parts of the NHS are pretty terrible to work in
    Anyway , if you do go for it , try not to worry too much about the interview. They will make allowances for the fact that you're new to the experience. Your youth may well be seen as a virtue , as much of the NHS has an ageing workforce
    Last edited by aife; 14-07-2017 at 7:40 PM.
    • raiiiraiii
    • By raiiiraiii 15th Jul 17, 1:34 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    raiiiraiii
    I've been invited for an interview because I have applied for this position.

    I know that I'm doing science and health-related studies, however, I felt as though this position (medical records admin.) would be a great starting point as I've always wanted a career within the NHS.

    Two of my placements were clinical -involved observing endoscopies, ERCP, etc. etc.
    And my first placement taken at the age of 15 was administrative. I basically fulfilled the same role as what I am applying for.

    When I first applied for this job, it was advertised to be at the main hospital in my city/ a smaller hospital in the same city. Both were written as the location. All three of my previous placements within the NHS were based at the main infirmary. However, when I received the invitation for the interview -it says its going to be based at the smaller hospital (which I'm completely fine with).

    I desperately need/want this job. I mean, it'd provide me with some financial support whilst living with my parents but even if I plan on going to university in a year -I don't mind doing this job on the side. I think its pretty common for people to be working on the side whilst going to Uni.

    I guess even though the job might be terrible, I could get a good feel for it and see how it goes.

    I hope they make allowances because I'm only 17 -However, I won't raise my hopes too much.

    Thanks for your reply!
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