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    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 22nd Sep 16, 5:20 PM
    • 36Posts
    • 5Thanks
    ST1991
    Damp Damp Damp
    • #1
    • 22nd Sep 16, 5:20 PM
    Damp Damp Damp 22nd Sep 16 at 5:20 PM
    We haven't bought the house yet, but are close to completion. We've had 2 damp companies around to quote us, and are aware the house has damp.
    It has risen above the existing damp proof course creating a 'band' of damp around the house, with the back wall of the house being wet all the way up at ground level (which may be due to the ground level outside being even to the indoor ground, and it having concrete flooring)

    Now... it's a pretty small 2 bed 1900's terrace, with 2 reception rooms downstairs (each approx 3.5x4.5)

    1 quote we've had includes tanking... whereas the other doesn't.
    Each state that the 2 outside walls (3.5 meters wide) need to be treated/re plastered to full height with DPC. All other walls need re plastering to 1.5M.
    quote without tanking is around £5, the other with it is £6.5k

    It seems a little excessive, although we do obviously want a quality job. Does anyone have any recent experience with DPC costs?

    Help appreciated!

    p.s we're too far along to bother with renegotiating the price of the house now... currently renting it pending exchange, been going on since January etc etc
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 22nd Sep 16, 5:44 PM
    • 21,958 Posts
    • 62,639 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 22nd Sep 16, 5:44 PM
    • #2
    • 22nd Sep 16, 5:44 PM
    Why would it need tanking? Is the back wall below ground?

    If you've read any posts about damp on these boards, you'll know what many of us think of damp treatment salespeople.

    Is this damp visible to you?
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 22nd Sep 16, 6:46 PM
    • 36,006 Posts
    • 39,369 Thanks
    G_M
    • #3
    • 22nd Sep 16, 6:46 PM
    • #3
    • 22nd Sep 16, 6:46 PM
    ....We've had 2 damp companies around to quote us, and are aware the house has damp.
    Originally posted by ST1991
    Let me gues - they provided you with a free 'survey'?

    Now - what business are they in? How do they make their money?

    Hint - by offering to do expensive remedial work which may or may not be appropriate/necessary.

    Pay an independant damp surveyor who does not do remedial work himself, for an objecive report/
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 22nd Sep 16, 8:16 PM
    • 2,788 Posts
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    Hoploz
    • #4
    • 22nd Sep 16, 8:16 PM
    • #4
    • 22nd Sep 16, 8:16 PM
    You need to eliminate the source of the damp. If the ground level outside is higher than the floor level then this needs addressing. Is it hard standing or soft eg garden soil? If its soft then it's easily altered. If it's hard surface eg patio then it needs digging out and a drainage channel put in.

    Tanking would be accepting there is damp and hoping to insulate the inside of the house while letting the outside remain damp.

    Once the cause of the damp is found it'll need to dry out or else you can chip away and replace the damp plaster
    • Katgrit
    • By Katgrit 23rd Sep 16, 7:39 AM
    • 412 Posts
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    Katgrit
    • #5
    • 23rd Sep 16, 7:39 AM
    • #5
    • 23rd Sep 16, 7:39 AM
    Wow that's expensive!

    I just had my 2 bed end terraced tanked. Well not "tanked" exactly, but surrounded with damp proof membrane rather than having it slurried.

    All 4 external walls (inside the house but still external if you get me!) and one internal wall taken back to brick full height, damp proof membrane applied with special fixing pegs, covered in dot and dab plasterboard with thermal insulation, 2 new ceilings, all plastered to full height including the stairwell wall which went right upstairs.

    £950 for damp proofing man which was membrane to half height, but not the floor doing. Would have been £720 cash but I paid extra for it to have a 20 year guarantee.
    £3200 for the plasterer, which included knocking off, thermal plasterboard, 2 ceilings, and all the plastering.

    And I thought the £3200 was a bit expensive.

    Hope that helps! If you're in the north west I can give you details.
    • Katgrit
    • By Katgrit 23rd Sep 16, 7:42 AM
    • 412 Posts
    • 1,112 Thanks
    Katgrit
    • #6
    • 23rd Sep 16, 7:42 AM
    • #6
    • 23rd Sep 16, 7:42 AM
    My 2 downstairs rooms are approx 4 x 4 m and 5.5 x 4 m. ish.

    Floor didn't need doing because that has been asphated at some point in past 30ish years

    House is an old pit cottage built in 1875.

    Just remembered, that price also included the adjoining kitchen wall in the little extension.
    Last edited by Katgrit; 23-09-2016 at 7:59 AM.
    • bmthmark
    • By bmthmark 23rd Sep 16, 9:11 AM
    • 88 Posts
    • 56 Thanks
    bmthmark
    • #7
    • 23rd Sep 16, 9:11 AM
    • #7
    • 23rd Sep 16, 9:11 AM
    I wouldn't commit to those kind of quotes.
    It sounds like you haven't moved in yet. Personally I would wait, move in and see how it goes.

    It wouldn't surprise me if there was no damp at all. Is the property currently vacant?

    Damp can be caused by something very simple like dodgy guttering.

    As someone has already stated, the damp companies business is damp. They are not going to turn up and say the property is fine as they would be turning down potential business.
    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 23rd Sep 16, 10:31 AM
    • 36 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    ST1991
    • #8
    • 23rd Sep 16, 10:31 AM
    • #8
    • 23rd Sep 16, 10:31 AM
    Thanks for all of your replies.

    It definitely does have damp, it is visible to us, and i walked around with the surveyor as they tested the walls.
    Wallpaper peeling around the damp 'band' and where painted, you can see the paint/plaster bubbling off. The back wall which is the worst is very wet.

    Outside is the same level, with hard-standing patio. Would you recommend digging down say half a foot, and replacing the patio there so it is not at the same level?

    p.s we are living in it until the sale goes through (renting from the seller) which i've discussed in a previous thread.
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 23rd Sep 16, 10:50 AM
    • 670 Posts
    • 643 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #9
    • 23rd Sep 16, 10:50 AM
    • #9
    • 23rd Sep 16, 10:50 AM
    Outside is the same level, with hard-standing patio. Would you recommend digging down say half a foot, and replacing the patio there so it is not at the same level?
    Originally posted by ST1991
    Yes, any external ground needs to be reduced to ideally 150mm below DPM.
    • bmthmark
    • By bmthmark 23rd Sep 16, 11:01 AM
    • 88 Posts
    • 56 Thanks
    bmthmark
    Thanks for all of your replies.

    It definitely does have damp, it is visible to us, and i walked around with the surveyor as they tested the walls.
    Wallpaper peeling around the damp 'band' and where painted, you can see the paint/plaster bubbling off. The back wall which is the worst is very wet.

    Outside is the same level, with hard-standing patio. Would you recommend digging down say half a foot, and replacing the patio there so it is not at the same level?

    p.s we are living in it until the sale goes through (renting from the seller) which i've discussed in a previous thread.
    Originally posted by ST1991
    When you say tested the walls was this the "damp expert"?
    If so this maybe useful to read: http://www.heritage-house.org/the-ping-prong-meter-guilty-of-fraud.html
    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 23rd Sep 16, 11:02 AM
    • 36 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    ST1991
    Yes, any external ground needs to be reduced to ideally 150mm below DPM.
    Originally posted by Grenage
    Would that be the same for the front of the house...?
    It was tenanted long-term previously, and they had piled mud (YES, MUD) at the front of the house against the exterior wall for the living room... and wondered why it was damp in that corner...

    At the front there is about a 2-3 inch gap between the paving slabs and exterior walls filled with what i can only describe as driveway pebbles/stones. No idea why..!
    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 23rd Sep 16, 11:08 AM
    • 36 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    ST1991
    When you say tested the walls was this the "damp expert"?
    If so this maybe useful to read: http://www.heritage-house.org/the-ping-prong-meter-guilty-of-fraud.html
    Originally posted by bmthmark
    That is the culprit they used!
    Although, it is visibly damp (where wallpaper has been peeled away you can clearly see a line between dry plaster at the bottom meter of the wall, then suddenly wet plaster, then dry plaster above it. This is on the adjoining walls as it is a terrace. Next door has no issues as they invited us to have a look at the work they had done, and we asked them.

    perhaps we DON'T, need a new damp proof course (except for the exterior walls, as they don't have one) but can just replaster above the existing DPC?
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 23rd Sep 16, 11:19 AM
    • 2,788 Posts
    • 2,492 Thanks
    Hoploz
    Would that be the same for the front of the house...?
    It was tenanted long-term previously, and they had piled mud (YES, MUD) at the front of the house against the exterior wall for the living room... and wondered why it was damp in that corner...

    At the front there is about a 2-3 inch gap between the paving slabs and exterior walls filled with what i can only describe as driveway pebbles/stones. No idea why..!
    Originally posted by ST1991
    That is to provide drainage. The gravel gives rainwater the chance to drain down past the ground level to soil beneath (and beneath the floor). As has already been said, modern building regs suggest ground level should be at least 6" or approx 2 bricks below floor level.
    • bmthmark
    • By bmthmark 23rd Sep 16, 11:21 AM
    • 88 Posts
    • 56 Thanks
    bmthmark
    I would take the advice of G_M (posted above):
    "Pay an independant damp surveyor who does not do remedial work himself, for an objecive report/"

    That way the person surveying is not doing the actual fix so it won't be in his/hers interest to lie.
    • phoebe1989seb
    • By phoebe1989seb 23rd Sep 16, 11:23 AM
    • 2,849 Posts
    • 5,979 Thanks
    phoebe1989seb

    At the front there is about a 2-3 inch gap between the paving slabs and exterior walls filled with what i can only describe as driveway pebbles/stones. No idea why..!
    Originally posted by ST1991
    Sounds as though some interpretation of a French drain may have already been added?

    Whilst I agree wholeheartedly with all the advice to lower external ground levels, this isn't always possible. Our last house (in a rural village) had Tarmac pavement right up against the front external wall of our Georgian stone building......and our current Victorian detached house is built into an escarpment, meaning it is 2+3 storeys (plus cellar) at the rear yet only appears to be 1+2 storeys at the front. If we were to lower our ground levels we'd have to dig down some 10' in places
    Last edited by phoebe1989seb; 23-09-2016 at 12:08 PM. Reason: Typo......
    Paid off mortgage early - mortgage-free since age 40 (2007)

    Over £40,000 mis-sold PPI reclaimed
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 23rd Sep 16, 11:34 AM
    • 3,622 Posts
    • 12,009 Thanks
    Slinky


    At the front there is about a 2-3 inch gap between the paving slabs and exterior walls filled with what i can only describe as driveway pebbles/stones. No idea why..!
    Originally posted by ST1991
    This may have been done to protect the wall against damage by rain. If you have a hard surface up to the bottom of your brick wall over a long time rain hitting the ground bounces up and hits your brickwork at the same sort of angle each time. If you have stones at the bottom, rain striking the stones is deflected in different directions causing less damage to the surface of your bricks.
    • cloo
    • By cloo 23rd Sep 16, 11:40 AM
    • 693 Posts
    • 454 Thanks
    cloo
    I also recommend an independent damp surveyor for this to get the true picture. Suppliers will *always* make the case for pricey work.
    • Katgrit
    • By Katgrit 23rd Sep 16, 11:53 AM
    • 412 Posts
    • 1,112 Thanks
    Katgrit
    I had an independant damp surveyor come round and talk me through everything, then got quotes off companies for the work he told me I needed doing. One thing he pointed out was a problem with terraced house afjoining walls I hadn't considered. Unless you're neighbor has had theirs done, then you definitely will need tanking or membrane rather than just the injectable stuff. This is because if you just have the injectable stuff done then damp will be rising in your neighbours walls and up structures like chimney breasts on your adjoining wall (my neighbors chimney is on the other side of the dining room wall) above the height of your injections, and so it'll get breached from next door.

    Was an old bloke past retirement age and he knew his stuff! Didn't own a company fixing damp, just told me what remedial action I needed to arrange.
    • amateur house
    • By amateur house 26th Sep 16, 10:04 PM
    • 34 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    amateur house
    I had an independant damp surveyor come round and talk me through everything, then got quotes off companies for the work he told me I needed doing. One thing he pointed out was a problem with terraced house afjoining walls I hadn't considered. Unless you're neighbor has had theirs done, then you definitely will need tanking or membrane rather than just the injectable stuff. This is because if you just have the injectable stuff done then damp will be rising in your neighbours walls and up structures like chimney breasts on your adjoining wall (my neighbors chimney is on the other side of the dining room wall) above the height of your injections, and so it'll get breached from next door.

    Was an old bloke past retirement age and he knew his stuff! Didn't own a company fixing damp, just told me what remedial action I needed to arrange.
    Originally posted by Katgrit
    How did you find the independent damp surveyor? I'm looking for a damp surveyor at the moment and was quoted £260/£290 which seems expensive. Another company that does the work will charge £90 for a survey and estimate to do any necessary work.
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 26th Sep 16, 10:55 PM
    • 479 Posts
    • 470 Thanks
    Mr.Generous
    Dont be tempted to just replaster, it costs next to nothing more to use plastering sand, cement and a damp proof additive. Gypsum plaster will draw any damp, the above mix wont. My brother in law has done damp work for about 20 years and used the high pressure injection stuff and more recently the creams. He has seen the electrical charge stuff fail many times, and the dutch vents (like ceramic breathers I think you'd describe them as) many times. They have had 1 guarantee claim they had to re-fix after 19 yrs. He says plaster off to 4ft (1.2 mtr) is the most you will need, in places if the damp is limited he recommends a minimum of a foot (300mm) higher than the highest damp spot. Renovating property I find the injection creams do work, just done a house and the materials cost about £150. It took two of us about 5 days to do the work.
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