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    • textbook
    • By textbook 21st Sep 16, 3:59 PM
    • 87Posts
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    textbook
    Good place to hide cash and other valuables?
    • #1
    • 21st Sep 16, 3:59 PM
    Good place to hide cash and other valuables? 21st Sep 16 at 3:59 PM
    If there are no floor boards (concrete flat). is the best place to put money etc in plastic waterproof box and under kitchen units behind board on floor?


    Thought about a box in corner of unit which could be seen as boxed in pipes or something but is plastic box under units best idea?
Page 1
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 21st Sep 16, 5:04 PM
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    GreyQueen
    • #2
    • 21st Sep 16, 5:04 PM
    • #2
    • 21st Sep 16, 5:04 PM
    If there are no floor boards (concrete flat). is the best place to put money etc in plastic waterproof box and under kitchen units behind board on floor?


    Thought about a box in corner of unit which could be seen as boxed in pipes or something but is plastic box under units best idea?
    Originally posted by textbook
    Generally speaking, it's not wise to have much cash at home. All the usual theft problems, plus fire, flood or possibly forgetting it or dying unexpectedly without being able to tell your nearest and dearest where to find your cash.

    However, if feel you must, there are ways and means. Most people aren't plumbers and you could try putting cash (or other small valuables) into a section of dummy pipework somewhere under the sink. Held on with proper brackets, it could look pretty convincing, until a real plumber gets under there and starts wondering about the pipework to nowhere...

    Towel rails and wardrobe/ clothes rail rails are usually hollow chromed tubing about 1 inch in diameter. Perfectly possible to hide things inside those, and it would take a determined thief to find them.

    Got curtains? Unless they're very lightweight ones, you've got hems which can be unpicked to create wee hidey-pockets.

    You could have a dummy can of product under the sink among the general clutter of cleaning materials and rags which most people hoard. Don't use something which is a solvent or adhesive, in case your place is turned over by a glue-sniffer.

    Go to £land and see if they've got those battery pillar candles in. Nice little void inside there. Stick your battery candle on a conventional candlestick on an out-of-the way shelf and let it get dusty.

    In the toe of a very tatty pair of unused shoes, in the back of a cupboard somewhere.

    Most burglaries are sub10 minute jobs. Most criminals are druggies looking for the price of their next fix. Not the brightest buttons. You won't be able to hide something from a CID-level search but if you can make life difficult, chances are that the crims will move on.

    Always, always, have a stash of not-so-valuables like rolled gold jewelley or fake branded watches, or a dead high end electronic plus a modest amount of cash somewhere easy to find. This is your sacrificial offering.

    I have a jewellery box which is sitting in plain sight. It contains some not-valuable jewellery (the only kind I own) and a number of what appear to be gold sovreigns to the untutored eye.

    I'd like to be a fly on the wall if anyone tried to flog them; they are actually nineteenth century gambling tokens made of pure brass, market value 50p each. But they look pretty special.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Lynplatinum
    • By Lynplatinum 22nd Sep 16, 11:37 PM
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    Lynplatinum
    • #3
    • 22nd Sep 16, 11:37 PM
    Agreed - most burglars are not intellectuals
    • #3
    • 22nd Sep 16, 11:37 PM
    Hiya

    Great ideas GQ!

    My mum used to hide £5 on page 5; £10 on page 10; £20 on page 20 of certain books on a certain topics!!

    When she died - she left over 1500 books! We had to spend ages looking through all of them, as, while she told me of this trick she neglected to tell me which topic!! (She must have been laughing herself silly knowing Mum!)

    But its still a good trick as I doubt the thieves are gonna sit down and read a book!!

    Also, when my son was burgled his dog saw the thieves off!! When my son rang me to tell me he had been broken into he was more concerned if the dog was ok!!!

    Son then installed a camera which sends remote pictures to his phone if it senses movement outside the back door - the dog wondered what this was and so we have several shots of a puzzled looking dog watching the camera when let out in the back garden - so funny
    nite all
    NSDs 2015:185/330 (allowing for hols etc)

    LBM: started Jan 2012 - still learning!
    Life gives us only lessons and gifts - learn the lesson and it becomes a gift.' from the Bohdavista
    • milasavesmoney
    • By milasavesmoney 23rd Sep 16, 1:07 AM
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    milasavesmoney
    • #4
    • 23rd Sep 16, 1:07 AM
    • #4
    • 23rd Sep 16, 1:07 AM
    The base of lamps. Be sure to neatly glue back the felt covering.

    Do not hid things in closets or dressers. Obvious I know, but it's surprising how many people think they have things hidden well. That said, my OH does have a bit of cash in an old suit breast pocket. Not sure if he is brilliant or dumb.

    My uncle took the side panel off his washing machine and taped an envelope full of money there.
    Sept $427.41/$500 ~~ 3/6 EF #46 $11,273/$15,000 ~~ Xmas/Bday 2016 $3002/$6500 ~~ WL 2016 ~15 lb
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 23rd Sep 16, 4:23 AM
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    monnagran
    • #5
    • 23rd Sep 16, 4:23 AM
    • #5
    • 23rd Sep 16, 4:23 AM
    My parent's house was broken into while they were on holiday. It was a large house in a prestigious road, but boy! did they choose the wrong house!
    Parents were never interested in 'worldly possessions.'
    The only things of value were some antiquarian books and some rare plants in the garden. None of which appealed as a source of quick cash.
    In fact the only thing the burglars could find to make off with was an old tin containing my Dad's supply of KitKats. I bet they were pretty ancient too as Dad tended to hoard them. They usually bent as you bit into them.

    Dad grieved over the loss of his KitKats.

    The next time they went on holiday Dad left a notice in the hall.

    IF YOU FIND ANYTHING WORTH TAKING I'LL SHARE IT WITH YOU.

    x
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 23rd Sep 16, 5:37 AM
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    Slinky
    • #6
    • 23rd Sep 16, 5:37 AM
    • #6
    • 23rd Sep 16, 5:37 AM
    Tampax box beside the toilet. No self respecting burglar is going to touch that.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 23rd Sep 16, 7:18 AM
    • 10,047 Posts
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    GreyQueen
    • #7
    • 23rd Sep 16, 7:18 AM
    • #7
    • 23rd Sep 16, 7:18 AM
    I once had a very interesting converstion with one of the Metropolitan Police's scene-of-the-crime officers, who I met briefly in a social situation.

    He told me that the most desirable items for burglars are cash, jewellery, bank cards, certain electronics, ID documents and car keys.

    Well, haven't got a car, my electronics are limited to a 14 y.o.desktop PC and an 19 y.o. CD player. Don't think they're gonna be taken away as have no resale value whatsoever.

    Among my 'jewellery' is what could easily be taken for a rose gold neck chain. It's rather pretty. It's actually made of copper and it's scrap value is 5p, which is why a pal who buys scrap offered it to me for free.

    There seems to be a psychology among thieves that if they have taken the trouble to get into somewhere (home, shed, whatever) they have to take something, even if it is of relatively low value. Which is why you should always have a sacrificial offering, so this need is fulfilled.

    Mind you, I know people who've had some surprising things taken in burglaries, as well as the typical things listed above; bonsai trees, the spice rack, pasta, a pkt of orange drinks, every item of food in cupboards, fridge and freezer, a 25 y.o. vacuum cleaner........

    If anyone is reading this and feeling smug because they've got a safe - I have some bad news. I know several people who have had their safes stolen in burglaries. And other people, who know quite a bit about safes, who tell me that any safe will break open if you hit it often enough on the corners with a lump hammer.

    There is also an aspect of safe-ownership which many don't think of; you can't usually bring them home by yourself. Which means that other people will know you have a safe, and may speak unwisely, or be dishonest themselves.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 23rd Sep 16, 7:23 AM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #8
    • 23rd Sep 16, 7:23 AM
    • #8
    • 23rd Sep 16, 7:23 AM
    ..and the ironic thing that is striking me is that thieves may read this thread....as well as normal people.

    I also think thieves are thick (certainly personal experience of encountering them helped confirm that) - but not that thick they can't read....
    Hearts starve as well as bodies - give us bread, but give us roses.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 23rd Sep 16, 7:46 AM
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    GreyQueen
    • #9
    • 23rd Sep 16, 7:46 AM
    • #9
    • 23rd Sep 16, 7:46 AM
    Which is why, Money, I haven't disclosed any information about where I might hide my valuables. Presupposing I had any valuables to hide. Which may or may not be the case, and which I am not going to tell the 'net about.

    A quick internet search will reveal no end of covert places to hide valuables, home-made and commercially available.

    A burglary will typically involve any piece of furniture which can be turned over being turned over, including beds. Drawers will be dumped out, cupboard contents hauled out, even books thrown about. Most things will be thrown around and upended. Cushions and pillows may be slashed open.

    Most people keep some valuables in their underwear drawer. The commonest place to hide valuables is in our bedrooms. Thieves know this.

    The commonest sort of burglary is a walk-in, when the householder has left a door unlocked or a window open. The commonest sort of burglar is a drug addict. Who is desperate and in a hurry and unlikely to be a connoisseur of antiquarian books, fine art or certain collectables. Most burglars are in and out with change from 10 minutes. All a householder needs to do is make sure that whatever they are hiding is deeper than a hasty search can uncover.

    My inner-city block is actually flagged by a major insurer (this I know from a pal who works for them) as a high crime neighbourhood. Funnily enough, in the 10 + years I've lived here, in a block with over100 flats, there have been precisely no burglaries and only a few shed break-ins.

    I doubt there are many suburban streets who could boast such a safety record. I attribute it to this being quite a poor neighbourhood, with many pretty streetwise people, a considerable few of whom have done time for crimes against persons and property. I'm sure I have a convicted murderer or two as near neighbours.

    Break into a flat at Shoebox Towers and you may end up carrying your teeth and your spleen home in your swag bag, frankly.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Gers
    • By Gers 23rd Sep 16, 7:57 AM
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    Gers
    I have no hiding places to offer, however if you have a stash of cash bear in mind that all bank notes are being replaced by the new polymer ones. All paper notes are being withdrawn gradually so your stash will become impossible to spend in a couple of years.
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 23rd Sep 16, 8:04 AM
    • 482 Posts
    • 473 Thanks
    Mr.Generous
    Some pretty ingenious places, no burglar is ever going to find cash inside the working parts of a washing machine. Not exactly handy for the owner though.
    I can confirm that small safe's are opened by force from when my brother discovered he'd lost his keys, passports were inside and they were going away in a couple of days.
    When we moved house years ago we had just purchased an expensive and desirable model of vacuum cleaner. I kept the box in case of any problem, but we cleaned our house before departure and were planing to do same when moving in. Being a MSE even in those days I used the box to help pack up, and found the kids paddling pool fitted neatly in the box. Being a retail man in those days I always taped boxes up beautifully, you tension the clear tape and produce a seal that looks factory. (How do you think retailers flog off all the stuff opened in the shop or ex display?)
    So on moving day, amid the confusion and sweat and toil I shifted the Dy... er sorry upmarket vacuum cleaner box around to the front of the house but my Dad and brother in law had taken a load in the van - we were only moving 1/2 mile, so I placed it by the drive with some other stuff and carried on fetching.
    Some enterprising swine spotted it because at some point I realised the £5 kids paddling pool was gone.
    I've often wondered, indeed hoped, that the thieving git sold it in a pub to some local hard case for £50 and got some physical retribution from the purchaser.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 23rd Sep 16, 8:14 AM
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    • 192,140 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    I have no hiding places to offer, however if you have a stash of cash bear in mind that all bank notes are being replaced by the new polymer ones. All paper notes are being withdrawn gradually so your stash will become impossible to spend in a couple of years.
    Originally posted by Gers
    Which is why my old fivers are currently in my purse being spent. But it is a good point. I think the £20 notes are going polymer in 2020.

    All banknotes ever issued by the Bank of England are redeemable, even when they are not spendable. Which means that you can pay outmoded bank notes into your bank account, or swop them over the counter for new ones, even after they have been withdrawn from circulation and shopkeepers will no longer take them. I witnesses two English £1 notes being changed for £1 coins recently and the cashier didn't bat an eyelid.

    Smart people keep an eye on their notes and make sure that they have the current ones in any cash stash they may be holding. Obvs, if you take bundles of outmoded notes into a bank, it may flag up unwanted attention from TPTB, so it would be prudent to change them over a little by little, as soon as the new notes start appearing.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Gers
    • By Gers 23rd Sep 16, 8:38 AM
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    Gers
    http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/Pages/about/faqs.aspx

    Some banks won't take old notes, some will.

    We've had new polymer notes in Scotland for a year now, though only from one bank so far. The other two will catch up soon I think.

    IN EDIT : http://www.scotbanks.org.uk/polymer_banknotes.php

    I had a little stash of new old notes (paper) which I spent the other week, replaced it with new ones. They're not particularly hidden, just put away.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 23rd Sep 16, 8:50 AM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    This is where I'm getting confused - as a poster on MSE said the other day that only the Bank of England will swop old notes. Logic tells me any bank has to swop them = whether they like it or no basically. Now I've just read two different verdicts on this thread.

    Does anyone have a link to what bank's obligations are (ANY bank - whether they like it or no) as regards this?
    Hearts starve as well as bodies - give us bread, but give us roses.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 23rd Sep 16, 8:56 AM
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    GreyQueen
    Interestingly, none of the Scottish bank notes are actually legal tender. Nor the Northern Irish ones. They can be used in payment, with the consent of both parties, but only Bank of England bank notes are legal tender in England and the devolved regions.

    I know people who have paid old ten shilling notes, as well as outmoded fivers, tenners and twenties, into various banks with no problems, and other pre-decimal bank notes, too. The banks aren't thrilled about it, as they have to send them to the BofE for destruction, but they've never refused. Obviously, if you are already their customer, it does help - I was asked this at the bank when I wanted to change notes into coins, the intimation being that if I didn't bank with them (I did), they wouldn't want to offer that service.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Gers
    • By Gers 23rd Sep 16, 9:33 AM
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    • 22,903 Thanks
    Gers
    Interestingly, none of the Scottish bank notes are actually legal tender. Nor the Northern Irish ones. They can be used in payment, with the consent of both parties, but only Bank of England bank notes are legal tender in England and the devolved regions.

    I know people who have paid old ten shilling notes, as well as outmoded fivers, tenners and twenties, into various banks with no problems, and other pre-decimal bank notes, too. The banks aren't thrilled about it, as they have to send them to the BofE for destruction, but they've never refused. Obviously, if you are already their customer, it does help - I was asked this at the bank when I wanted to change notes into coins, the intimation being that if I didn't bank with them (I did), they wouldn't want to offer that service.
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    Think you're confusing 'legal tender' - an outmoded term, with 'legal currency'.

    http://www.acbi.org.uk/legal_position.php

    And this -
    http://www.scotbanks.org.uk/legal_position.php
    Last edited by Gers; 23-09-2016 at 9:38 AM.
    • SailorSam
    • By SailorSam 23rd Sep 16, 10:17 AM
    • 20,513 Posts
    • 35,101 Thanks
    SailorSam


    If anyone is reading this and feeling smug because they've got a safe - I have some bad news. I know several people who have had their safes stolen in burglaries. And other people, who know quite a bit about safes, who tell me that any safe will break open if you hit it often enough on the corners with a lump hammer.

    There is also an aspect of safe-ownership which many don't think of; you can't usually bring them home by yourself. Which means that other people will know you have a safe, and may speak unwisely, or be dishonest themselves.
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    When i started on the Cabs i bought myself a second-hand safe 'cos it was the only time we'd had cash in the house. It was very old and although only about 2' tall it took 3 of us to move with the help of a trolley jack. I felt the cash was safe from the biggest theif of all .......... the taxman.
    Being serious though it's fireproof, so even now when there's nothing valuable in there, there is important paperwork. I even leave the key in the lock thesedays so if i did have a break-in they could look without causing any damage.
    Liverpool is one of the wonders of Britain,
    What it may grow to in time, I know not what.

    Daniel Defoe: 1725.
    • Shropshirelass
    • By Shropshirelass 23rd Sep 16, 11:01 AM
    • 202 Posts
    • 2,702 Thanks
    Shropshirelass
    We had an incident in this road a few days ago, involving an elderly couple. Villain walked in through the back door and took cash from handbag and cupboard while householders watched the evening soaps. No breaking involved as door was unlocked.
    Last incident was about 5 years ago, crims worked their way round the estate on a Saturday night trying all the doors. They took spanner and socket sets, and 2 bottles of lemonade. They were only disturbed when they tried to break into house where laptop was clearly visible through kitchen window. Ex-army resident chased them away, though I believe he gave one of them a bit of a thump first.
    Now I am obsessive about locking doors, and closing curtains at night. Money is put well out of sight. Don't want to make it easy for them.
    • Upsidedown Bear
    • By Upsidedown Bear 23rd Sep 16, 11:17 AM
    • 16,089 Posts
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    Upsidedown Bear
    I keep a small amount of emergency cash in a book called "How to cope when the money runs out".

    It seemed appropriate
    The Devil whispered in my ear "You are not strong enough to withstand the storm".
    Today I whispered in the Devil's ear "I am the storm".

    In Solidarity with Jeremy Corbyn
    JezWeDidAgain

    • philbostavros
    • By philbostavros 23rd Sep 16, 11:33 AM
    • 217 Posts
    • 110 Thanks
    philbostavros
    This reminds me of a holiday to Ibiza many years ago. We were staying in an apparthotel with friends and their young daughter, being an enquisitive type, looked behind the pictures on the wall.

    To everyone's surprise, pinned to the back of one, was a 5000 peseta note (told you it was a long time ago)! A previous occupier had abviously thought it better to keep it there than in the communial safety deposit boxes in the lobby?
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