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  • FIRST POST
    • Scorpio33
    • By Scorpio33 21st Sep 16, 2:52 PM
    • 341Posts
    • 528Thanks
    Scorpio33
    Should I quit my job without another one lined up
    • #1
    • 21st Sep 16, 2:52 PM
    Should I quit my job without another one lined up 21st Sep 16 at 2:52 PM
    Background on me: mid-30s, married with 2 young kids, earning around 50k.


    I work in Finance and have been in my current job for 2.5years. I have been unhappy in my current job for the last 1.5years. The reason why I am unhappy is that I feel that a lot of what is expected of me is above my current level of knowledge (without sufficient training), there is no one supporting me or checking my work, the environment I work in is toxic (some very nasty individuals) and the work leaves me feeling stressed, anxious and depressed. I have tried making it work, talked to my boss about my concerns, but he is just as unhappy about my performance than I am in the job. He expects me to do what he wants due to me being a manager. I can't make it work and now the only way forward I can see is leaving.


    Every weekend I get the Sunday night blues, every day I dread going into work and at night I can't stop thinking about work. I then get stressed out and take it out on my kids and hate myself for doing it. At work I panic every time the phone goes or I get an email, through fear of what may await me on the other end.


    I have been looking for a new role for about a year now, but nothing good has come up. Moreover, I think that as the job is having such an effect on me mentally, my confidence is shot and I can't think straight, making it impossible for me to (a) find a job and (b) sell myself to recruiters.

    So now I am thinking of quitting without another job lined up.


    I have 4 months salary saved up and I have to give 3 months notice, which gives me 7 months to find a job. Once I am out of this role I think that my mental health would pick up an enable me to find something else.


    The issue I have is that all my instincts are telling me to quit, but my head is telling me that is a bad idea. Employers like someone who is employed and moreover, if I don't find much I like, I could be tempted to take anything in order to get money coming in.


    Then saying that, I fear it is only a matter of time before I get sacked. Surely it is better to resign than be sacked?




    Is it ever a good idea to resign without a job to go to?
Page 3
    • missbiggles1
    • By missbiggles1 22nd Sep 16, 2:16 PM
    • 14,508 Posts
    • 26,202 Thanks
    missbiggles1
    Of course that's is possible but a it's very pessimistic outlook. Anyone with the talents to get a 50k job in their mid-30s shouldn't have that much difficulty in finding something which suits them. Just be honest with recruiters. There's no shame in admitting to making a wrong turn in your career and making a fresh start. Better that you do something about it now than wait another 5-10 years.

    I'd also look at short term contract work where companies need some extra staff for a few months for a specific project. You don't have the long term security but it's a good way to get experience a different environments and the basic pay is often higher (but other benefits such as pension contributions, health insurance, bonuses etc lower or non-existent). Also as a contractor you typically don't get bogged down in internal company politics as you are just there to do a job.
    Originally posted by Doshwaster
    If it's going to be that easy (and I hope you're right), then why not apply now whilst still working? If the OP can't get a suitable job while s/he's working, it isn't going to get any easier after a period of unemployment!
    • Bogalot
    • By Bogalot 22nd Sep 16, 2:50 PM
    • 141 Posts
    • 241 Thanks
    Bogalot
    How about the civil service? You can maintain your current salary but get the work life balance you're looking for.

    As well as the CS Jobs website they recruit through Manpower. Look at Grade 7 positions, possibly Grade 6 but they'll come with more responsibility.

    I wouldn't leave your existing position without somewhere to go to, it's too risky. That's not to say you can't take some time out before you start a new position, just with the assurance that you've got something to go to.
    • Bmth100
    • By Bmth100 22nd Sep 16, 2:56 PM
    • 997 Posts
    • 2,559 Thanks
    Bmth100
    Background on me: mid-30s, married with 2 young kids, earning around 50k.


    I work in Finance and have been in my current job for 2.5years. I have been unhappy in my current job for the last 1.5years. The reason why I am unhappy is that I feel that a lot of what is expected of me is above my current level of knowledge (without sufficient training), there is no one supporting me or checking my work, the environment I work in is toxic (some very nasty individuals) and the work leaves me feeling stressed, anxious and depressed. I have tried making it work, talked to my boss about my concerns, but he is just as unhappy about my performance than I am in the job. He expects me to do what he wants due to me being a manager. I can't make it work and now the only way forward I can see is leaving.


    Every weekend I get the Sunday night blues, every day I dread going into work and at night I can't stop thinking about work. I then get stressed out and take it out on my kids and hate myself for doing it. At work I panic every time the phone goes or I get an email, through fear of what may await me on the other end.


    I have been looking for a new role for about a year now, but nothing good has come up. Moreover, I think that as the job is having such an effect on me mentally, my confidence is shot and I can't think straight, making it impossible for me to (a) find a job and (b) sell myself to recruiters.

    So now I am thinking of quitting without another job lined up.


    I have 4 months salary saved up and I have to give 3 months notice, which gives me 7 months to find a job. Once I am out of this role I think that my mental health would pick up an enable me to find something else.


    The issue I have is that all my instincts are telling me to quit, but my head is telling me that is a bad idea. Employers like someone who is employed and moreover, if I don't find much I like, I could be tempted to take anything in order to get money coming in.


    Then saying that, I fear it is only a matter of time before I get sacked. Surely it is better to resign than be sacked?




    Is it ever a good idea to resign without a job to go to?
    Originally posted by Scorpio33
    Your salary etc makes your position sound quite specialized - in that you can't just walk into a job 2 weeks later like a customer service or admin person might.

    Similar position to me on my last job hunt then.

    I spent a year looking, whilst working at my existing job. I got 2 offers the same day but like I say, it took a year.

    Incidentally, it was the same position as you in that the job was toxic and the company fire people for breathing. You just gotta stick it out.
    • Scorpio33
    • By Scorpio33 22nd Sep 16, 3:15 PM
    • 341 Posts
    • 528 Thanks
    Scorpio33
    How about the civil service? You can maintain your current salary but get the work life balance you're looking for.

    As well as the CS Jobs website they recruit through Manpower. Look at Grade 7 positions, possibly Grade 6 but they'll come with more responsibility.

    I wouldn't leave your existing position without somewhere to go to, it's too risky. That's not to say you can't take some time out before you start a new position, just with the assurance that you've got something to go to.
    Originally posted by Bogalot

    I have an alert that emails me daily with any civil service jobs - there never seems to be any on there. If anything, the civil service seem to be cutting back.


    Fair enough re the time out prior to starting a new role - something that I will consider.
    • Scorpio33
    • By Scorpio33 22nd Sep 16, 3:16 PM
    • 341 Posts
    • 528 Thanks
    Scorpio33
    Your salary etc makes your position sound quite specialized - in that you can't just walk into a job 2 weeks later like a customer service or admin person might.

    Similar position to me on my last job hunt then.

    I spent a year looking, whilst working at my existing job. I got 2 offers the same day but like I say, it took a year.

    Incidentally, it was the same position as you in that the job was toxic and the company fire people for breathing. You just gotta stick it out.
    Originally posted by Bmth100

    Understand what you are saying and that is the issue - I have no idea how long it will take me to find a role.


    The only thought I had is that I would be able to devote more time to searching and selling myself without the stress of the job. Understand your point though.
    • Bogalot
    • By Bogalot 22nd Sep 16, 3:18 PM
    • 141 Posts
    • 241 Thanks
    Bogalot
    I have an alert that emails me daily with any civil service jobs - there never seems to be any on there. If anything, the civil service seem to be cutting back.


    Fair enough re the time out prior to starting a new role - something that I will consider.
    Originally posted by Scorpio33
    Definitely not at HMRC, but you would need a tax specialism. They are recruiting 50+ at present.
    • Scorpio33
    • By Scorpio33 22nd Sep 16, 3:25 PM
    • 341 Posts
    • 528 Thanks
    Scorpio33
    Definitely not at HMRC, but you would need a tax specialism. They are recruiting 50+ at present.
    Originally posted by Bogalot

    ...and tax is the one thing I have no experience in unfortunately.
    • Walcott
    • By Walcott 22nd Sep 16, 3:56 PM
    • 789 Posts
    • 766 Thanks
    Walcott
    I work in finance too. Can you give some specific examples of what you are expected to do that you cannot do?

    I understand completely where you are coming from. When I qualified in practice I left for an industry role and hated it. Just resigned at 3 months and moved on. That was in June and took the summer off and went back end of September. I only got that job because I was immediately available and it changed my career for the better. I resigned again 3 years later with no job to go to. Took 2 months off. TBH I don't even get asked about it.

    If you want to do it, and only you can decide, then go for it. Resigning with no job is not a bad thing to all employers. Some want accountants immediately and don't consider candidates on 3 months notice. There is also contracting which should be no issue for a Big 4 qualified accountant.
    • Scorpio33
    • By Scorpio33 22nd Sep 16, 4:13 PM
    • 341 Posts
    • 528 Thanks
    Scorpio33
    I work in finance too. Can you give some specific examples of what you are expected to do that you cannot do?

    I understand completely where you are coming from. When I qualified in practice I left for an industry role and hated it. Just resigned at 3 months and moved on. That was in June and took the summer off and went back end of September. I only got that job because I was immediately available and it changed my career for the better. I resigned again 3 years later with no job to go to. Took 2 months off. TBH I don't even get asked about it.

    If you want to do it, and only you can decide, then go for it. Resigning with no job is not a bad thing to all employers. Some want accountants immediately and don't consider candidates on 3 months notice. There is also contracting which should be no issue for a Big 4 qualified accountant.
    Originally posted by Walcott

    When you say you changed your career for the better, what did you move to?


    When I moved to industry I have had various roles, but this one is too hands on. On top of that, there is a lot of non-finance (what I would term compliance) items which I have to do (being the only one wit a grasp of numbers). I hate being that hands on, I prefer to oversee things and not worry about the details.


    If I knew I would never get sacked, I guess I would never leave here until I found something better. It is the fear of having a black mark against my name which makes me want to jump before I am pushed if that makes sense?
    • Doshwaster
    • By Doshwaster 22nd Sep 16, 4:23 PM
    • 4,372 Posts
    • 3,492 Thanks
    Doshwaster
    I agree, being available for an immediate start can be a huge benefit when job hunting. As long as you haven't been out of work for years I wouldn't expect any employer to be bothered if you've been on a career break of a few months. (A "career break" sounds better than being "unemployed" as it's something you chose to do for positive reasons)

    For my current position, I had the telephone interview on the Thursday, I went in to meet the team for lunch on the Friday and I started on the Monday.

    I don't know anything about contracting in the finance sector but I know a lot of people who do it in IT and most of them wouldn't want to work any other way.
    • Walcott
    • By Walcott 23rd Sep 16, 9:05 AM
    • 789 Posts
    • 766 Thanks
    Walcott
    When you say you changed your career for the better, what did you move to?


    When I moved to industry I have had various roles, but this one is too hands on. On top of that, there is a lot of non-finance (what I would term compliance) items which I have to do (being the only one wit a grasp of numbers). I hate being that hands on, I prefer to oversee things and not worry about the details.


    If I knew I would never get sacked, I guess I would never leave here until I found something better. It is the fear of having a black mark against my name which makes me want to jump before I am pushed if that makes sense?
    Originally posted by Scorpio33
    I am an ACA and I trained in small practice. I always intended to go to industry but being from small practice makes that hard. That is what happened in my first industry role where it ended up being very junior and there were other issues as well so i quit. I then went back into practice but this time to a consultancy firm that is very large with 100+ offices around the world. That made it very easy for me to then go back into industry after 2.5 years and I got a much more senior position. So for me it helped me out a lot. I personally don't like transactional stuff or going into the detail so stuff like looking at invoices or doing recs of prepayments is boring. I like technical stuff more and the role at the large consultancy meant I could work with large clients and do consolidations etc meaning I went to industry in a Group role so I only work on Group areas and avoid the day to day issues, which I really hate.

    To be quite frank, I really feel for you. If you are from the Big 4 then hands on isn't for you. I'm surprised they employed you given that where you trained would jump straight out. Sounds like they are very dis-organised with people that are not very bright and you seem to be the balancing figure in all of this having to be pulled in every direction to make up the difference.

    You should take stock and remember all the positive aspects of your situation. You are qualified, have money in the bank to see you out a few months and you have actually been in this role a while. You seem low on confidence but that is not really your fault. That is just a symptom of the environment you are in.

    Just my opinion, but if I was in your shoes I would resign now and finish up before Christmas, have a nice break through Jan and begin looking. I would be very surprised if you struggled to get work as an immediately available practice trained accountant with industry experience.
    • YouAsked
    • By YouAsked 23rd Sep 16, 9:14 AM
    • 17 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    YouAsked
    ^^^^^That sounds like really good, knowledgeable advice from Walcott and I must say, if I had known you were big 4 qualified, I probably would have spared you my tale of woe as it's pretty unlikely to apply to you!

    Good luck with whatever you decide to do - these things have a way of working out.
    • nanny beach
    • By nanny beach 23rd Sep 16, 9:28 AM
    • 31 Posts
    • 41 Thanks
    nanny beach
    Frankly, I would NEVER leave a job without finding another, have seen from friends/relatives experience, employers seem more keen to employ someone who is already in employment. I think we all have times when we find our jobs really stressful for different reasons, unfortunately. There is an old saying "if you cant do what you like, you have to like what you do". I would make sure you keep dates etc. of going to your boss stating you feel your job is more than your skill set, you are not getting any assistance, JUST in case they dismiss you. Then start looking, for something else.it might seem like a relief in the short term, to be rid of this job, for your mental health, but 7 months soon flies by, if it is nearing its time, and you havent found another position I think your stress levels will rocket.
    • Scorpio33
    • By Scorpio33 23rd Sep 16, 9:59 AM
    • 341 Posts
    • 528 Thanks
    Scorpio33
    I am an ACA and I trained in small practice. I always intended to go to industry but being from small practice makes that hard. That is what happened in my first industry role where it ended up being very junior and there were other issues as well so i quit. I then went back into practice but this time to a consultancy firm that is very large with 100+ offices around the world. That made it very easy for me to then go back into industry after 2.5 years and I got a much more senior position. So for me it helped me out a lot. I personally don't like transactional stuff or going into the detail so stuff like looking at invoices or doing recs of prepayments is boring. I like technical stuff more and the role at the large consultancy meant I could work with large clients and do consolidations etc meaning I went to industry in a Group role so I only work on Group areas and avoid the day to day issues, which I really hate.

    To be quite frank, I really feel for you. If you are from the Big 4 then hands on isn't for you. I'm surprised they employed you given that where you trained would jump straight out. Sounds like they are very dis-organised with people that are not very bright and you seem to be the balancing figure in all of this having to be pulled in every direction to make up the difference.

    You should take stock and remember all the positive aspects of your situation. You are qualified, have money in the bank to see you out a few months and you have actually been in this role a while. You seem low on confidence but that is not really your fault. That is just a symptom of the environment you are in.

    Just my opinion, but if I was in your shoes I would resign now and finish up before Christmas, have a nice break through Jan and begin looking. I would be very surprised if you struggled to get work as an immediately available practice trained accountant with industry experience.
    Originally posted by Walcott

    That is very helpful advice - and you are correct in that m confidence is low.


    I spoke to someone last night who said to me that I already know what I want to do, I just am looking for approval - which I don't need.


    I guess the issue is that by nature I am not a risk taker, so can't bring myself to take the risk of not having another job lined up.
    • enginesuck
    • By enginesuck 23rd Sep 16, 10:03 AM
    • 113 Posts
    • 142 Thanks
    enginesuck
    I quit my job a few years ago,


    Over time it became very hard to get motivated with all the time off. by month 3 by brain wasn't as sharp as I hadn't been using it for work, it came good in the end but it was a close run thing ! I ended up with a job offer after 5 months and started in Month 7, month 8 before I was paid a monthly pay packet. 8 months without earning is pretty hard going emotionally and financially, I was fortunate to have about 30 months salary saved, although obviously that took a big hit.


    If it is making you that fed up, could you get temporary work just to get you out the house for a few hours ? You can devote 3 hours a day to job searching and still have time for some part time work and loads of family time. Just an idea.
    • Scorpio33
    • By Scorpio33 23rd Sep 16, 10:50 AM
    • 341 Posts
    • 528 Thanks
    Scorpio33
    If I ignore the financial aspect, I would be quitting. The job is making me unhappy - why stay in a job that makes me unhappy.


    Unfortunately we all have bills to pay, so then it is merely a question of can I survive without a job until I find another one. The big question there is how long will it take to find another job. That is the unknown and that is what I need to weigh up.


    On balance, I am not a risk taker, so most likely won't quit. But then I need to think about how much this is costing me in terms of mental health and effect on my family against how much the job gives me financially.
    • missbiggles1
    • By missbiggles1 23rd Sep 16, 11:21 AM
    • 14,508 Posts
    • 26,202 Thanks
    missbiggles1
    If I ignore the financial aspect, I would be quitting. The job is making me unhappy - why stay in a job that makes me unhappy.


    Unfortunately we all have bills to pay, so then it is merely a question of can I survive without a job until I find another one. The big question there is how long will it take to find another job. That is the unknown and that is what I need to weigh up.


    On balance, I am not a risk taker, so most likely won't quit. But then I need to think about how much this is costing me in terms of mental health and effect on my family against how much the job gives me financially.
    Originally posted by Scorpio33
    You seem to be missing a couple of connections there, like what effect will unemployment have on your family rather than just on you.
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 23rd Sep 16, 11:57 AM
    • 934 Posts
    • 1,256 Thanks
    Malthusian
    I guess my thinking is that if I resign, I have a strict deadline to work to. That may give me more impetus in looking for a new role.
    If the job is that bad you should have all the impetus you need already, without needing to cut off your income.

    If you are actually fully committed to finding a new job ASAP then this should take a lot of the stress out of the existing one. Some of your colleagues are nasty? Who cares, you'll be shot of them soon. You're not able to do the work they ask you? Who cares, the worst that can happen is that they fire you and you wanted to leave anyway. Turn up, do the job asked of you as best you can, take the money. If you're mentally committed to leaving, then nothing else matters.
    • Walcott
    • By Walcott 23rd Sep 16, 12:35 PM
    • 789 Posts
    • 766 Thanks
    Walcott
    That is very helpful advice - and you are correct in that m confidence is low.


    I spoke to someone last night who said to me that I already know what I want to do, I just am looking for approval - which I don't need.


    I guess the issue is that by nature I am not a risk taker, so can't bring myself to take the risk of not having another job lined up.
    Originally posted by Scorpio33
    That is also fine. If you want to leave but need to find another role first then forget about everything else and focus on finding another role and what you need to do to make that happen.

    By the sound of it you are not applying for the right roles as some have come back and said you are overqualified?
    • Going4TheDream
    • By Going4TheDream 23rd Sep 16, 7:06 PM
    • 1,204 Posts
    • 2,822 Thanks
    Going4TheDream
    Background on me: mid-30s, married with 2 young kids, earning around 50k.


    I work in Finance and have been in my current job for 2.5years. I have been unhappy in my current job for the last 1.5years. The reason why I am unhappy is that I feel that a lot of what is expected of me is above my current level of knowledge (without sufficient training), there is no one supporting me or checking my work, the environment I work in is toxic (some very nasty individuals) and the work leaves me feeling stressed, anxious and depressed. I have tried making it work, talked to my boss about my concerns, but he is just as unhappy about my performance than I am in the job. He expects me to do what he wants due to me being a manager. I can't make it work and now the only way forward I can see is leaving.


    Every weekend I get the Sunday night blues, every day I dread going into work and at night I can't stop thinking about work. I then get stressed out and take it out on my kids and hate myself for doing it. At work I panic every time the phone goes or I get an email, through fear of what may await me on the other end.


    I have been looking for a new role for about a year now, but nothing good has come up. Moreover, I think that as the job is having such an effect on me mentally, my confidence is shot and I can't think straight, making it impossible for me to (a) find a job and (b) sell myself to recruiters.

    So now I am thinking of quitting without another job lined up.


    I have 4 months salary saved up and I have to give 3 months notice, which gives me 7 months to find a job. Once I am out of this role I think that my mental health would pick up an enable me to find something else.


    The issue I have is that all my instincts are telling me to quit, but my head is telling me that is a bad idea. Employers like someone who is employed and moreover, if I don't find much I like, I could be tempted to take anything in order to get money coming in.


    Then saying that, I fear it is only a matter of time before I get sacked. Surely it is better to resign than be sacked?




    Is it ever a good idea to resign without a job to go to?
    Originally posted by Scorpio33

    I very recently did , the environment was toxic and colleagues more so, even though I was paid a good salary, I decided I could no longer do it. After 6 weeks off to recover, and after speaking to a few contacts I applied for a couple of jobs, slightly different industry than my previous one and for a slightly lower salary but better benefits and was offered a position with one of them, also a lot closer to home..

    Set yourself a leave date as a goal to aim for, update and revamp your CV and tailor it to each role you apply for so it doesn't become stale, Speak to relevant consultation agencies and get someone working on your next role for you, call them regularly to see what may be coming up. Network, I was offered an opening that had not been advertised yet due to networking, Do something everyday to make the job change happen and you will find something that fits your needs.

    Only you know what you can realistically do due to commitments but honestly I can assure you that once I had left my anxiety levels dropped. I slept properly for the 1st time in months, my mood improved, I started to enjoy life again rather than just existing in it. I hope it all works out for you
    Dont wait for your boat to come in 'Swim out and meet the bloody thing'
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