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    • Caroline_a
    • By Caroline_a 20th Sep 16, 10:08 PM
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    Caroline_a
    Doggy swimming
    • #1
    • 20th Sep 16, 10:08 PM
    Doggy swimming 20th Sep 16 at 10:08 PM
    So when my two came back from their 7 months in foster care when I was ill, I noticed that Oakley was getting a little stiff around his hips. The vet wasn't too bothered, said that she thought he was just getting a little 'creaky' - he's 7 now, and is a very long-backed GSD. So rather than waiting for him to need pain meds I started taking him (and Sid) for some fun swims in our local hydrotherapy pool.

    They absolutely love it! They get half an hour of continuous swimming, and it knocks them out for a good 24 hours, so happy snoring dogs! It also seems to be strengthening Oakley's hips and back legs too, he doesn't seem as wobbly at all. Sid of course is a water dog with webbed feet, so swims round like a loony chasing toys. Initially Oakley was a bit tentative, but he wears a life jacket thing and now is happy swimming back and forward after balls thrown for him.

    It's not that cheap as a dog hobby, but for me if it helps the old boy's mobility, it's worth every penny!!
Page 1
    • chucknorris
    • By chucknorris 21st Sep 16, 5:04 AM
    • 8,132 Posts
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    chucknorris
    • #2
    • 21st Sep 16, 5:04 AM
    • #2
    • 21st Sep 16, 5:04 AM
    So when my two came back from their 7 months in foster care when I was ill, I noticed that Oakley was getting a little stiff around his hips. The vet wasn't too bothered, said that she thought he was just getting a little 'creaky' - he's 7 now, and is a very long-backed GSD. So rather than waiting for him to need pain meds I started taking him (and Sid) for some fun swims in our local hydrotherapy pool.

    They absolutely love it! They get half an hour of continuous swimming, and it knocks them out for a good 24 hours, so happy snoring dogs! It also seems to be strengthening Oakley's hips and back legs too, he doesn't seem as wobbly at all. Sid of course is a water dog with webbed feet, so swims round like a loony chasing toys. Initially Oakley was a bit tentative, but he wears a life jacket thing and now is happy swimming back and forward after balls thrown for him.

    It's not that cheap as a dog hobby, but for me if it helps the old boy's mobility, it's worth every penny!!
    Originally posted by Caroline_a
    Sounds great, how much does it cost, and for how long?
    Last edited by chucknorris; 21-09-2016 at 5:11 AM.
    Chuck Norris can kill two stones with one bird
    The only time Chuck Norris was wrong was when he thought he had made a mistake
    Chuck Norris puts the "laughter" in "manslaughter".
    2016 fitness campaign: After running injuries I now also hike, cycle and swim, less impact on my joints.

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    • Caroline_a
    • By Caroline_a 21st Sep 16, 9:19 AM
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    Caroline_a
    • #3
    • 21st Sep 16, 9:19 AM
    • #3
    • 21st Sep 16, 9:19 AM
    I pay £30 for both for half an hour. As they are always out of their depth it's a proper work out, so doesn't need to be any longer.
    • jrtfan
    • By jrtfan 21st Sep 16, 7:18 PM
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    jrtfan
    • #4
    • 21st Sep 16, 7:18 PM
    • #4
    • 21st Sep 16, 7:18 PM
    A friend's elderly Harrier has the same kind of hydrotherapy and for the same reason. My friend is delighted by how well it's been helping with her dog's mobility. Glad to hear it's doing your dogs good as well
    • Caroline_a
    • By Caroline_a 21st Sep 16, 7:33 PM
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    Caroline_a
    • #5
    • 21st Sep 16, 7:33 PM
    • #5
    • 21st Sep 16, 7:33 PM
    They've been tonight, and after a mad hour or so on their return they are now crashed out and snoring. I think that these small hydrotherapy pools are more and more offering 'fun' swims for anyone, rather than those referred by vets.

    I would recommend them to anyone, if only to give their dog a treat! Even those that are initially a little apprehensive seem to embrace it and have a lovely time.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 21st Sep 16, 7:48 PM
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    teddysmum
    • #6
    • 21st Sep 16, 7:48 PM
    • #6
    • 21st Sep 16, 7:48 PM
    It would terrify my 13 year-old cavalier, as he doesn't even like baths (shivers all the time) or being out in rain.
    • chucknorris
    • By chucknorris 21st Sep 16, 8:09 PM
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    chucknorris
    • #7
    • 21st Sep 16, 8:09 PM
    • #7
    • 21st Sep 16, 8:09 PM
    It would terrify my 13 year-old cavalier, as he doesn't even like baths (shivers all the time) or being out in rain.
    Originally posted by teddysmum
    Our last dog (god bless him) Mills was a lab/springer cross, he absolutely hated baths but absolutely loved swimming ! He loved it.

    It has crossed my mind a few times to build a dog hydrotherapy (and fun swim) centre, but I'm not sure if there would be enough demand. The objective would be only to cover costs, rather than make a profit, Mills lost the use of his rear legs to cancer before he passed away, he could have really benefited from something like that.
    Chuck Norris can kill two stones with one bird
    The only time Chuck Norris was wrong was when he thought he had made a mistake
    Chuck Norris puts the "laughter" in "manslaughter".
    2016 fitness campaign: After running injuries I now also hike, cycle and swim, less impact on my joints.

    User's on ignore: Pizza laddie (anchovypizza)
    • jrtfan
    • By jrtfan 22nd Sep 16, 11:13 AM
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    jrtfan
    • #8
    • 22nd Sep 16, 11:13 AM
    • #8
    • 22nd Sep 16, 11:13 AM
    Our last dog (god bless him) Mills was a lab/springer cross, he absolutely hated baths but absolutely loved swimming ! He loved it.

    It has crossed my mind a few times to build a dog hydrotherapy (and fun swim) centre, but I'm not sure if there would be enough demand. The objective would be only to cover costs, rather than make a profit, Mills lost the use of his rear legs to cancer before he passed away, he could have really benefited from something like that.
    Originally posted by chucknorris

    I suppose it needn't be too expensive to set something up initially, just to 'test the water' so to speak (sorry, terrible pun! ). Have you seen these above-ground easy-set rectangular pools (Bestway has a range, I think)? These were being used for the Dash'n'Splash challenge at Paws in the Park last weekend and the largest pool must have been 16' long. If you had somewhere under shelter to set up a pool like this, could it be an inexpensive way to offer doggy fun swimming and see how much interest it might generate, before committing yourself to anything more permanent? Just a thought.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 22nd Sep 16, 3:16 PM
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    teddysmum
    • #9
    • 22nd Sep 16, 3:16 PM
    • #9
    • 22nd Sep 16, 3:16 PM
    Our last dog (god bless him) Mills was a lab/springer cross, he absolutely hated baths but absolutely loved swimming ! He loved it.

    It has crossed my mind a few times to build a dog hydrotherapy (and fun swim) centre, but I'm not sure if there would be enough demand. The objective would be only to cover costs, rather than make a profit, Mills lost the use of his rear legs to cancer before he passed away, he could have really benefited from something like that.
    Originally posted by chucknorris


    It's being wet rather than the actual bath that upsets Joly.


    We used to have two springers who hated baths, but loved getting wet and would happily sit under the spray from a garden hose.


    The bath aversion wasn't about soap, either, as we would often come home to find teeth marks in the soap on the wash basin. The girls wanted to steal the soap, but couldn't quite reach and would also, grab a soap wrapper if possible and eat that.
    • Caroline_a
    • By Caroline_a 22nd Sep 16, 3:32 PM
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    Caroline_a
    They're funny in their likes and dislikes aren't they. My GSD would happily paddle in streams etc but was very very uncomfortable going out of his depth, he used to splash about a lot getting back to being able to put his feet down. However, now he has his 'life jacket' and swims very gracefully chasing down toys in the pool. I'll be interested to see how he is out of his depth in one of the pools that we encounter on walks - not tested that yet!
    • arbrighton
    • By arbrighton 22nd Sep 16, 7:17 PM
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    arbrighton
    Trying to guess what Ripple, my miniature poodle would make of it. She swims and retrieves very well but will only go in if she can walk in rather than jump!
    • yellowbear
    • By yellowbear 22nd Sep 16, 7:49 PM
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    yellowbear
    I think £15 for 30 mins is quite reasonable.

    I have a lab who loves the water. She can smell it a mile off, but ask her to go in the garden for a wee when it's raining and you almost have to prise her paws off the door frame!
    • Caroline_a
    • By Caroline_a 22nd Sep 16, 8:15 PM
    • 3,622 Posts
    • 9,949 Thanks
    Caroline_a
    Trying to guess what Ripple, my miniature poodle would make of it. She swims and retrieves very well but will only go in if she can walk in rather than jump!
    Originally posted by arbrighton
    There's a wooden ramp up to the rim of the pool, then another ramp that goes into the pool and which can be pushed down into it. Having said that, it's the only time mine are a little cautious, so they tend to get a big shove to get them in! Last time the Shepherd went right under the water but came up with a big grin and set off to find the nearest tennis ball! He's so confident now, just loves it!
    • catkins
    • By catkins 26th Sep 16, 8:59 AM
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    catkins
    I took my dog when he was a puppy. It was just for fun really and because it is good exercise.

    He went once a week for about 10 weeks but he never liked it much. He never wanted to swim and you would have to walk along with him encouraging him all the time (my OH used to go in with him as I hate water).

    We stopped taking him because it seemed pointless which was a shame
    The world is over 4 billion years old and yet you somehow managed to exist at the same time as David Bowie
    • Caroline_a
    • By Caroline_a 27th Sep 16, 12:56 PM
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    Caroline_a
    Took the dogs for a long walk at the weekend where there was a stream with a lovely clear deep pool. The GSD has always just stayed in his own depth before but this time he swam all over, happily chasing sticks! So it's done him lots of good that way!
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