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  • FIRST POST
    • spadoosh
    • By spadoosh 20th Sep 16, 3:30 PM
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    spadoosh
    Cycling fashion
    • #1
    • 20th Sep 16, 3:30 PM
    Cycling fashion 20th Sep 16 at 3:30 PM
    After some advice about clothing whilst cycling.

    To set the scene, i commute to work planning on about 3/4 days a week, used to be so than i got a bit lazy and now doing it about once a week. Home to work is ~10 miles. And im in the north west so get wet a lot!

    Ive no idea how to handle the clothing side of things. Ive always just bought the chepest at aldi and made do with it. Tend to find anything that says waterproof isnt really and have quite a few issues with elastics fraying and general poor quality.

    Cant seem to find a cycling jersey that fits properly and if i do its normally a few washes before it starts to be mishapen and rides badly up my bike.

    Always struggled with waterproofs, their not when im on the bike. Did a bit of a compromise by using my everyday jacket a lot more waterproof but certainly not breathable! Also they stink up real quick!

    Not a huge fan of lycra (dont know if i just by the wrong sizes but its tight on the elasticated bits, ok for the commute but on a weekend ride it irritable after a couple of hours.

    O and im severely restricted with budget (my bike is the triban 500 and whilst a beautiful and functional machine its budget end and something i spent a long time making sure i got right). If i had hundreds of pounds knocking around for clothing, i wouldve spent it on the bike if that makes sense!

    Im definately and practicalities over style person (but have noticed some pretty sweet merino jerseys! at £80+ though, the OH would shout a lot!)



    Im a loner and have no bike buddies to guide me! Please help solve any of my cycling fashion dilemmas, i just dont understand cycle clothing.
    Don't be angry!
Page 1
    • bebewoo
    • By bebewoo 20th Sep 16, 4:05 PM
    • 594 Posts
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    bebewoo
    • #2
    • 20th Sep 16, 4:05 PM
    • #2
    • 20th Sep 16, 4:05 PM
    I cycle 10 miles each way every day have done for years now and have tried many, many different so called waterproofs. Even stuff that is made from waterproof material leaks at the seams when I'm out cycling for long periods of time.
    The only items I have found to be actually waterproof are the North Face jackets/trousers made from the hyvent material. I usually get them in the sale they last for years. They are not the trendiest looking though.
    • spadoosh
    • By spadoosh 20th Sep 16, 4:51 PM
    • 3,392 Posts
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    spadoosh
    • #3
    • 20th Sep 16, 4:51 PM
    • #3
    • 20th Sep 16, 4:51 PM
    I actually use a hyvent north face jacket and it seems to hold up pretty well in the rain! I just notice i get hotter and there can be quite a lot of sweatiness inside the jacket. Generally just wear shorts, not a big fan of the rustling and the rubbing of trousers. Maybe time to look at getting another, as mentioned they can get quite smelly, its been washed and nikwaxed a few times but it never stays fresh.

    Sorry about the grammar and spelling in the OP, made a right dogs dinner of it!
    Last edited by spadoosh; 20-09-2016 at 4:53 PM.
    Don't be angry!
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 20th Sep 16, 7:06 PM
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    Nasqueron
    • #4
    • 20th Sep 16, 7:06 PM
    • #4
    • 20th Sep 16, 7:06 PM
    I have the hyvent legs for another sport I do, after a number of washes the water no longer "beads" and runs off but rather just soaks in.

    The best waterproof suggestions I have, depending on budget:

    Gore over trousers with shorts underneath - proper waterproof material like on a coat
    Sportful Fiandre Norain bibs (or shorts) which do a great job of beading water on that sort of commute - over several hours, maybe not but eh!

    Don't forget also water can run down into your shoes making riding unpleasant (and clipless shoes usually have vents in the bottom letting water in) which is where over trousers are good or get some shoes covers. Best if you can afford it would be some sealskinz (or similar) waterproof socks and some waterproof boots from Northwave

    ultimately though you get what you pay for, on a budget you will either get non-breathable gear that makes you sweat a lot, that doesn't have a good fit or isn't really waterproof
    • Moto2
    • By Moto2 20th Sep 16, 7:27 PM
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    Moto2
    • #5
    • 20th Sep 16, 7:27 PM
    • #5
    • 20th Sep 16, 7:27 PM
    Forget about waterproof, just get wet, you will anyway with sweat
    Take your work clothes in a back pack

    Aldi/Lidl baselayers, a short sleeved mountain bike jersey, a long sleeved mountain bike jersey, a windproof jacket, mountain bike shorts, leg warmers.
    That should cover most eventualities
    If you don't like tight fitting stuff, just buy it looser
    Romanes eunt domus Romani ite domum
    • somersethillbilly
    • By somersethillbilly 20th Sep 16, 7:53 PM
    • 483 Posts
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    somersethillbilly
    • #6
    • 20th Sep 16, 7:53 PM
    • #6
    • 20th Sep 16, 7:53 PM
    Check out your local Army Surplus store. I commute in shorts and an ex Army Goretex smock/ jacket with hood and a dayglow bib over the top. The goretex jacket is warm, waterproof and breatheable and cost £25, a fraction of the price of a North Face/ Berghaus etc and the bib was 99p.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 20th Sep 16, 8:35 PM
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    esuhl
    • #7
    • 20th Sep 16, 8:35 PM
    • #7
    • 20th Sep 16, 8:35 PM
    I was lucky enough to get a 70% discount on a Gore cycling jacket. It's described as a water-resistant wind-stopper, but it does actually keep you dry. It's well-ventilated, with a front zip and detachable arms.

    I never would have paid full-price for it. But, having tried one, it's well-worth it. It gets a lot of use.

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/gore-bike-wear-phantom-20-windstopper-convertible-jacket/

    I also bought a cheap (~£15) nylon-like waterproof top from a budget high-street sports shop. It's not breathable, so you can end up wet from sweat on long/strenuous rides. But it's okay for nipping to the shops when it's howling it down.

    Another good tip for keeping dry and comfortable when cycling is to wear a baselayer. These are designed to be snug-fitting, non-absorbent, and to wick sweat away from the body so you don't end up feeling cold and damp.

    Wear a cheap nylon jersey over the baselayer (so, again, it doesn't absorb sweat). I just get the loose ones from Halfords or Trespass that cost about £10 to £15. I haven't had any problems with them becoming mis-shapen or wearing out quickly.

    If it's really cold, I wear an acrylic or woollen jumper over that, with the Gore jacket on top. It's all about the layers!
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 20th Sep 16, 9:36 PM
    • 518 Posts
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    Mr_Singleton
    • #8
    • 20th Sep 16, 9:36 PM
    • #8
    • 20th Sep 16, 9:36 PM
    Forget about waterproof, just get wet, you will anyway with sweat

    Aldi/Lidl....
    Originally posted by Moto2
    Not so. Long rides in poor weather I use a 7mesh Revelation jacket which keeps the rain out and breathes enough to let sweat out hence me dry. For quick commutes to work and back or errands etc I use a Rapha City Rain Jacket.

    Maybe if you didn't 'go cheap' and spent a bit more you too would benefit dry riding.
    • Moto2
    • By Moto2 20th Sep 16, 10:32 PM
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    Moto2
    • #9
    • 20th Sep 16, 10:32 PM
    • #9
    • 20th Sep 16, 10:32 PM

    Maybe if you didn't 'go cheap' and spent a bit more you too would benefit dry riding.
    Originally posted by Mr_Singleton
    I wish, just spent nearly £1k on new winter stuff - besides the OP has said they're 'severely restricted' with his budget so I'm not sure how Rapha would fit with that, unless you do?
    Romanes eunt domus Romani ite domum
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 21st Sep 16, 12:29 AM
    • 1,968 Posts
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    Johnmcl7
    I was lucky enough to get a 70% discount on a Gore cycling jacket. It's described as a water-resistant wind-stopper, but it does actually keep you dry. It's well-ventilated, with a front zip and detachable arms.

    I never would have paid full-price for it. But, having tried one, it's well-worth it. It gets a lot of use.

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/gore-bike-wear-phantom-20-windstopper-convertible-jacket/

    I also bought a cheap (~£15) nylon-like waterproof top from a budget high-street sports shop. It's not breathable, so you can end up wet from sweat on long/strenuous rides. But it's okay for nipping to the shops when it's howling it down.
    Originally posted by esuhl
    I bought a decent Gore jacket that was cheap on clearance in a local store and I was impressed with it, great quality, very lightweight and very waterproof. I was pretty gutted when I grinded it along the ground and ripped up the shoulder then found how pricey it was to replace it. I managed to get one unused from someone that it didn't fit for a good price.

    I'd had a few different cheaper jackets but they had similar issues with being very sweaty, zips coming away or not being that waterproof.

    John
    • brat
    • By brat 21st Sep 16, 7:37 AM
    • 2,318 Posts
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    brat
    I spend a bit on cycle clothing, mostly Rapha. I work on the premise that if you buy well, you buy once. Rapha classic jerseys are excellent for general use and because they contain merino wool, they don't smell of sweat. They're not as fitted as the pro kit, so a little more forgiving if your waistline is not fully match fit.

    Like Mr Singleton I've used the Rapha rain jacket for the last 3 years for commuting. It does the job well and it's lightweight.

    I can't help with cheap. Aldi seem to give a lot for the money. My wife has bought Aldi kit. She can't resist a 'bargain', but has quickly upgraded because she didn't like the fit or the style. So, no bargain really.
    Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler.
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 21st Sep 16, 8:31 PM
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    Nasqueron
    Not so. Long rides in poor weather I use a 7mesh Revelation jacket which keeps the rain out and breathes enough to let sweat out hence me dry. For quick commutes to work and back or errands etc I use a Rapha City Rain Jacket.

    Maybe if you didn't 'go cheap' and spent a bit more you too would benefit dry riding.
    Originally posted by Mr_Singleton
    While I don't stretch to Rapha I've used Peazl Isumi, Gore and Aldi, the Aldi top I sweat a lot more in but even a £145 Gore top I can sweat in warm wet weather, it can just be you as a person are too hot for the clothing, even stuff classed as breathable.

    The pros in the 2013 Milan-San Remo ignored their sponsors (and risked fines) and wore the Castelli Gabba and the v2 was out last year (at £180!)

    Cycle weekly rated the BíTwin Aerofit 900 jacket (£49.99) 8/10 higher than some more expensive jackets (including the Rapha Pro Team Softshell Jacket @ £200 )
    • brat
    • By brat 22nd Sep 16, 1:45 PM
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    brat
    Rapha is one of these brands that engenders a love/hate relationship with cyclists. It is expensive, but it is generally very good quality. The pro team soft shell jacket is excellent for cold wet training rides. It has a knack of keeping you very comfortable without overheating. I've worn it lots of times and wouldn't be without it. But it's not a commuting jacket, nor should it be confused for one or compared to them.

    Rapha have a no-quibble, no cost returns policy, and they repair kit for free too.

    I don't sell kit on, I usually wear it until it's out of fashion or worn, but my friend sells his Rapha kit on ebay every year, and he generally gets about 60% to 70% of the RRP back. That becomes even more of a financial no-brainer if you buy it on a 20%-30% off deal which they offer from time to time.
    Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 22nd Sep 16, 10:04 PM
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    esuhl
    I forgot to mention that I have some trousers from a camping shop to use in winter. They're designed to be lightweight, water-resistant (again, waterproofs would get too sweaty), quick-drying and have zip-off legs so you can turn them into shorts if you get warm. They were reasonably cheap (less than £30, I think).
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 23rd Sep 16, 10:23 AM
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    Nasqueron
    I forgot to mention that I have some trousers from a camping shop to use in winter. They're designed to be lightweight, water-resistant (again, waterproofs would get too sweaty), quick-drying and have zip-off legs so you can turn them into shorts if you get warm. They were reasonably cheap (less than £30, I think).
    Originally posted by esuhl
    Waterproofs only get too sweaty if you are a hot person or you buy cheap, the Gore leggings I have are fine for cycling in winter and with shorts I don't have issues with sweat, they just keep you dry and are breathable
    • Throbbe
    • By Throbbe 23rd Sep 16, 6:43 PM
    • 447 Posts
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    Throbbe
    Generally I'm at the cheaper end of the market, but I have found that for nasty weather gear it is worth the spend. I too have a Rapha City Jacket and a Gabba depending on weather/mood and I think both are worth what I paid. They've lasted


    Again, echoing what others have said, you can get substantial discounts by buying end of line or out of season. I rarely if ever pay rrp and both items above had a significant discount (but were still costly!)


    I've also bought second hand, which if you're a bit tubby like me is great, because people often sell on fairly new stuff that no longer fits because they've lost weight. Unfortunately I've also dropped an X or two from in front of the L since taking up cycling, so am less able to take advantage.
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 23rd Sep 16, 8:54 PM
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    Nasqueron
    Aldi have a sale coming up next week as well (Thursday I think) with some cheap gear, could easily tidy you over until next year and then get some 2016 stock in the spring clearances
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