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  • FIRST POST
    • bigfreddiel
    • By bigfreddiel 16th Sep 16, 6:10 PM
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    bigfreddiel
    How to lose weight - it's simple
    • #1
    • 16th Sep 16, 6:10 PM
    How to lose weight - it's simple 16th Sep 16 at 6:10 PM
    For anyone wanting to lose weight this the answer and it's very simple.

    Eat less - exercise a bit.

    And that's it. If you really do want to lose weight just do it!

    Diets do not work, that is why there are so many.

    Eating less is just as easy, if not easier than following some fad or diet of the moment.

    Good luck fj
Page 4
    • cazs
    • By cazs 18th Oct 16, 7:56 PM
    • 470 Posts
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    cazs
    Regrettably, walking doesn't do that much in terms of calorie burn unless you're walking either uphill or very quickly on the flat indeed.

    I'm a pretty fast walker, but you still only burn around 100 cals for a flat half hour walk. That's the same as say, a slice of bread.

    The amount of calories in food vs the time it takes to work said food off is a real downer.

    So while exercise can help lose weight it is definitely slower than reducing calorie intake. However, whilst the theory is relatively straight forward, I agree that it's not easy peasy in practice.
    • dktreesea
    • By dktreesea 18th Oct 16, 8:11 PM
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    dktreesea
    Yeah, cos it really is that simple.

    I have calorie restricted and it led to bingeing. I really, REALLY want to be the weight I used to be but I am still overweight. And believe me, I have tried, pretty much everything. I lived on shakes for 4 months, so if that doesn't prove this 'will power' you speak of, then I don't know what will.

    As I say, I am not convinced of the physics regarding the calorie in vs calorie out theory. I have read plenty to contradict that.

    And as for the it's the amount, not the type of food..so, if I had 250 kcals of chicken and veg, as opposed to a chocolate bar, then that would have the same effect on my body?? I think not.

    As others have said, there are lots of things associated with obesity, emotional eating, comfort, social eating etc etc. These things shouldn't be overlooked or dismissed, and as I said, if it really was that simple, there would be no such thing as obesity.
    Originally posted by Anoneemoose

    But you didn't have to binge. You chose to binge.
    • Anoneemoose
    • By Anoneemoose 18th Oct 16, 10:16 PM
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    Anoneemoose
    But you didn't have to binge. You chose to binge.
    Originally posted by dktreesea
    No, there was no choice. It was compulsion. Purely brought on by the initial restriction of calorie reduction.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 19th Oct 16, 8:33 AM
    • 14,308 Posts
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    FBaby
    No, there was no choice. It was compulsion. Purely brought on by the initial restriction of calorie reduction.
    I'm sorry to be blunt, but this is what you chose to believe to give yourself an excuse for failing. Totally understandable, so not a criticism at all, but still not right.

    My view is that the reason why you haven't find a way to lose weight is because you haven't yet found what is right for YOU. I personally believe that there isn't a right or wrong way, just a way that works for you. You need to find what that is, but also accept that whatever it is, it will involve restrictions and will power. There are no miracle ways to lose weight, all of them involves telling yourself 'no', you just have to find the easiest way for you to do so.

    Most weight gain is due to bad habits. Problem with habits is that because it is the norm for us, it feels right and any changes is what is out of the norm. I am a normal weight through constant watching my weight, not in an obsessive way, but in a monitoring way so that the moment I get out of my zone, I can do something about it before it becomes too hard to manage. Last year, I put on 1/2 a stone (which is a lot for me) and couldn't understand why I wasn't losing weight despite my efforts. Then last spring, I took more drastic actions, lost the weight and so far managed to keep it down with little efforts. Looking back, it has become obvious that I was eating too much, but because it was over the day, it didn't seem like it. It is only by comparing, seeing that I am just fine with what I eat now, that I can see that I didn't need to eat as much as I did even though I was thinking then it was reasonable.
    • Anoneemoose
    • By Anoneemoose 19th Oct 16, 9:51 AM
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    Anoneemoose
    I'm sorry to be blunt, but this is what you chose to believe to give yourself an excuse for failing. Totally understandable, so not a criticism at all, but still not right.

    My view is that the reason why you haven't find a way to lose weight is because you haven't yet found what is right for YOU. I personally believe that there isn't a right or wrong way, just a way that works for you. You need to find what that is, but also accept that whatever it is, it will involve restrictions and will power. There are no miracle ways to lose weight, all of them involves telling yourself 'no', you just have to find the easiest way for you to do so.

    Most weight gain is due to bad habits. Problem with habits is that because it is the norm for us, it feels right and any changes is what is out of the norm. I am a normal weight through constant watching my weight, not in an obsessive way, but in a monitoring way so that the moment I get out of my zone, I can do something about it before it becomes too hard to manage. Last year, I put on 1/2 a stone (which is a lot for me) and couldn't understand why I wasn't losing weight despite my efforts. Then last spring, I took more drastic actions, lost the weight and so far managed to keep it down with little efforts. Looking back, it has become obvious that I was eating too much, but because it was over the day, it didn't seem like it. It is only by comparing, seeing that I am just fine with what I eat now, that I can see that I didn't need to eat as much as I did even though I was thinking then it was reasonable.
    Originally posted by FBaby
    I agree with a lot of what you are saying, but not the first line. I did not 'choose' to binge. When I restricted myself, my body craved food, my brain craved food, as in its survival instinct. Why do you think most people who start diets think constantly about what they 'can't' or 'shouldn't' have? I didn't plan my binges a lot of the time, I just ate everything in sight. The only difference between me and someone with bulimia was my phobia of vomiting. That was also the thing that seemed to stop me getting help for it. I didn't make myself sick, so I was 'ok'. Hmmm.

    I have lost weight and gained it again numerous times by following so called 'healthy' lifestyles. Slimming World being the main one. I will also stand by my comments that dieting (alongside ill health) made me obese. And again, before anyone points out, calorie restriction IS dieting. Prior to dieting, I never thought of foods as good and bad, I ate what I wanted (what my body wanted) and it kept itself 'healthy'.

    I also want to say I am not trying to get out of taking responsibility for myself..I spent so many years trying and failing to lose weight permanently by following someone else idea of healthy. That led to the behaviours I described where I felt like I was no longer in control of my own body. I don't profess to know what the answer is, but I do know it isn't calorie restriction or dieting..at least not in the long term.

    If weight loss really was that easy, why is the obesity epidemic growing?
    • dktreesea
    • By dktreesea 19th Oct 16, 11:44 AM
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    dktreesea
    No, there was no choice. It was compulsion. Purely brought on by the initial restriction of calorie reduction.
    Originally posted by Anoneemoose

    Even food addicts have a choice. Are you saying you had no control over what you put in your mouth? That couldn't be right. Of course you did.


    I was addicted to chocolate for more years than I care to remember. There would be a time, somewhere during the day, that I "had to have" some. I've even got up in the middle of the night and driven to an all night supermarket to buy it. But I always knew I had a choice not to eat, just one I wasn't prepared to make at the time.


    I've only given it up in the last few months, due to a medical condition. I don't think I quite realised how much I spent on sweet treats before because my bank account has made remarkable leaps forward since.
    • dktreesea
    • By dktreesea 19th Oct 16, 12:00 PM
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    dktreesea
    If weight loss really was that easy, why is the obesity epidemic growing?
    Originally posted by Anoneemoose

    it could be something quite sinister as in big food corporations getting us hooked onto a certain taste, so hooked that other, more natural tastes don't satisfy us as much.


    One thing I noticed since giving up chocolate is I no longer have such a sweet palate. Everything tastes way too sweet.


    I wonder if this is the same for people who usually eat processed or fast foods. Are there ingredients added to these foods that aim to give the people eating their products such satisfaction that they can't stop, even when they feel full and whenever they do feel like eating, they gravitate towards those particular products? Why is sugar, one of the most addictive substances on the planet that could even give cocaine a run for its money, added to savoury food? We wouldn't do it if we were cooking the dish from scratch.


    My children love roast dinners, but have both told me that none of their other friends have roasts at home. That's a real shame. We've had people over who have never tasted Yorkshire pudding, something we can all make from scratch.


    As for deep fried pizzas and chips with cheese, whoever invented these two concoctions needs to be arrested!
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 19th Oct 16, 1:47 PM
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    Pollycat
    My children love roast dinners, but have both told me that none of their other friends have roasts at home. That's a real shame. We've had people over who have never tasted Yorkshire pudding, something we can all make from scratch.


    As for deep fried pizzas and chips with cheese, whoever invented these two concoctions needs to be arrested!
    Originally posted by dktreesea
    We love roast dinners too.
    But it's a rare treat - as it should be.
    And ours comes with loads of veg.

    Why don't your kids' friends have roast dinners?
    Because they (or their parents) can't cook them?
    Or because they think they are not healthy?

    'deep fried pizza'?
    Seriously?
    • dktreesea
    • By dktreesea 19th Oct 16, 2:02 PM
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    dktreesea
    We love roast dinners too.
    But it's a rare treat - as it should be.
    And ours comes with loads of veg.

    Why don't your kids' friends have roast dinners?
    Because they (or their parents) can't cook them?
    Or because they think they are not healthy?

    'deep fried pizza'?
    Seriously?
    Originally posted by Pollycat

    Yes, half a pizza, dropped into the deep fryer the same way you'ld cook partly cooked already battered fish.


    As to not having roast dinners, I get the impression the parents weren't brought up with this tradition. And maybe also the cost of something like a leg of lamb.


    Why should roasts only be a rare treat? We have a roast every week.


    Some of my children's friends have never eaten haggis, much less know how to prepare it. Feels odd, being in Scotland and remembering being here from time to time during my own childhood, all the food special to here that we ate, and yet nowadays talking to children who have never eaten swede, parsnips, turnips, or even more modern vegetables like cauliflower and broccoli.
    Last edited by dktreesea; 19-10-2016 at 2:04 PM.
    • fairy lights
    • By fairy lights 19th Oct 16, 2:07 PM
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    fairy lights
    Yes, half a pizza, dropped into the deep fryer the same way you'ld cook partly cooked already battered fish.


    As to not having roast dinners, I get the impression the parents weren't brought up with this tradition. And maybe also the cost of something like a leg of lamb.
    Originally posted by dktreesea
    If the parents weren't bought up with the tradition, then I don't know why you'd see it as a shame that their kids have never had a roast. There may well be other dishes the families regularly cook from scratch.
    As for deep fried pizzas and cheesy chips, those are both things that are fine as a treat once in a while, it's pretty obvious that both are high in calories and low in nutrients, if people chose to ignore that and eat them too often then it's not the fault of the inventors.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 19th Oct 16, 2:12 PM
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    Pollycat
    Yes, half a pizza, dropped into the deep fryer the same way you'ld cook partly cooked already battered fish.


    As to not having roast dinners, I get the impression the parents weren't brought up with this tradition. And maybe also the cost of something like a leg of lamb.


    Some of my children's friends have never eaten haggis, much less know how to prepare it. Feels odd, being in Scotland and remembering being here from time to time during my own childhood, all the food special to here that we ate, and yet nowadays talking to children who have never eaten swede, parsnips, turnips, or even more modern vegetables like cauliflower and broccoli.
    Originally posted by dktreesea
    Lordy!
    My Mum worked in a pub Sunday lunchtime & I (aged 17) was responsible for cooking the 'proper' Sunday dinner (& that was 45 years ago)

    How old are the parents who don't know how to cook it?

    I couldn't imagine not eating good veg (& well done for not confusing swede & turnip).

    As for haggis, a friend brought some back from Edinburgh & I wish he hadn't bothered. (Maybe it wasn't a good quality one?).
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 19th Oct 16, 5:39 PM
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    FBaby
    When I restricted myself, my body craved food, my brain craved food, as in its survival instinct
    But you didn't have to binge. If you were hungry, you could have just had something healthy to eat rather than overdose on food to compensate.

    The problem is, the more you eat, the more you crave it (like most things!), so yes, your brain (mainly) and your body (out of habit) was asking for more, but that wasn't out of NEED but out of HABIT. It goes back to what I was saying, it is about re-educating your brain and body to what is right for you, whatever this right is.

    Prior to dieting, I never thought of foods as good and bad, I ate what I wanted (what my body wanted) and it kept itself 'healthy'.
    How long ago was this? My experience (myself and people I speak with) is that age impacts a lot on how much we can get away with, and what we can eat in our early 20s whilst still managing to stay the same weight, and what we need to do in our 40s is very different. That doesn't mean that the way we ate at 20 was right and therefore that it's not our fault if we put on weight in our 40s. It means that we need to accept that we can get away with murder as we did then.

    That led to the behaviours I described where I felt like I was no longer in control of my own body. I don't profess to know what the answer is, but I do know it isn't calorie restriction or dieting..at least not in the long term.
    And indeed, it might very well be that it doesn't work for you, but there will be a way for you to lose weight. My way is unconventional, hence why I tried other methods, but I have certainly come to accept that it is what works for ME. That means no breakfast, a very small lunch (300 calories) but whatever I want to eat between 4-5 pm. What I have found is that I do NOT need food to keep me going in the morning. I know a lot of people think they would faint without it. Maybe they would and I'm just different, or again, it's just habit. I've learnt that not only do I not need it, but I actually feel much much better without food in my stomach, including if I do high intensity exercise. Amazingly, I will feel much less hungry throughout the morning than I do if I have something soon after getting up.

    I then get all the mental pleasure of eating without counting quantities once a day. I do tend to eat quite healthily anyway, but just had too much of it. It now doesn't matter so much because that's all I'll really have. I then found myself quite stuffed so don't feel the need for any more food until the following day. It works for me because if feel that I eat without restricting myself, but when I do count how many calories I have taken on during the day, I realised that it is usually around 1800-2000, which means that I maintain my weight.

    The only restriction I had to impose on myself was giving up cakes and other sugary things, however, I have found that once you do give it up, so do the cravings. I rarely long for a cake, and one I do have the occasional one, it doesn't change how I feel.

    This works for me, but it certainly doesn't mean it would work for other people. It's about trying different things and going with your instinct. However, the fact remain that whichever method you use, if you eat more than what is the correct number of calories for you over a certain period (be it 24 hours or a week), you WILL put on weight, end of.

    If weight loss really was that easy, why is the obesity epidemic growing?
    The theory of weight loss is very simple, the applying it is hard, and the less willpower you have, the harder it will be.
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 19th Oct 16, 10:32 PM
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    theoretica
    My experience is that people who are addicted to tobacco get more sympathy than people addicted to food. Giving up entirely is a simpler mental proposition than cutting back - but not practical with all food, though some people do go cold turkey with sugar or other food types.
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • dktreesea
    • By dktreesea 20th Oct 16, 1:42 AM
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    dktreesea
    If the parents weren't bought up with the tradition, then I don't know why you'd see it as a shame that their kids have never had a roast. There may well be other dishes the families regularly cook from scratch.
    As for deep fried pizzas and cheesy chips, those are both things that are fine as a treat once in a while, it's pretty obvious that both are high in calories and low in nutrients, if people chose to ignore that and eat them too often then it's not the fault of the inventors.
    Originally posted by fairy lights

    Some people are just not interested in cooking. One of the parents told me they wouldn't know how to go about cooking chips from scratch. Another mum told me she'd eaten scrambled eggs but had "no clue" about how to make them herself. They just know about different things, I guess, like fashion, which labels to buy, getting their nails done, which hair colour works best.
    • dktreesea
    • By dktreesea 20th Oct 16, 1:48 AM
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    dktreesea
    Lordy!
    My Mum worked in a pub Sunday lunchtime & I (aged 17) was responsible for cooking the 'proper' Sunday dinner (& that was 45 years ago)

    How old are the parents who don't know how to cook it?

    I couldn't imagine not eating good veg (& well done for not confusing swede & turnip).

    As for haggis, a friend brought some back from Edinburgh & I wish he hadn't bothered. (Maybe it wasn't a good quality one?).
    Originally posted by Pollycat

    The parents are all now in their 40s or 50s. The do things like buying banana smoothies in bottles instead of buying yoghurt, fresh bananas and milk and blending their own. There's me thinking they have a nice blender on their kitchen bench but there's a kind of disconnect. It's like wanting to own an electric, say, whisk but not actually ever wanting to use it. Or owning ten cookbooks but never actually trying to make anything. Or having a car in the driveway that you never actually drive anywhere.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 20th Oct 16, 4:26 AM
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    Pollycat
    Why should roasts only be a rare treat? We have a roast every week.
    Originally posted by dktreesea
    Personally, I prefer variety in the meals I cook & eat.

    Having a roast dinner every week - even if you vary the meat - would be boring to me
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 20th Oct 16, 7:26 AM
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    FBaby
    My experience is that people who are addicted to tobacco get more sympathy than people addicted to food. Giving up entirely is a simpler mental proposition than cutting back - but not practical with all food, though some people do go cold turkey with sugar or other food types.
    Originally posted by theoretica
    Losing weight is a personal decision so sympathy should be irrelevant. What is the point of comparing losing weight and cutting down smoking? Both are hard in their own ways and one will find one harder then the other. What they both have in common is that success will only come with will power. There is no cutting corners hoping not to have to follow the rules rigidely but still gain the benefits. It won't happen.
    • Anoneemoose
    • By Anoneemoose 20th Oct 16, 8:24 AM
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    Anoneemoose
    Losing weight is a personal decision so sympathy should be irrelevant. What is the point of comparing losing weight and cutting down smoking? Both are hard in their own ways and one will find one harder then the other. What they both have in common is that success will only come with will power. There is no cutting corners hoping not to have to follow the rules rigidely but still gain the benefits. It won't happen.
    Originally posted by FBaby
    Not that I want sympathy, because I am happy with my own way of thinking, a lot of people (judging by posts on here) think someone who is overweight just needs to sort themselves out, or that they're lazy and greedy. And it seems like fat shaming is still acceptable.

    Also, smokers can abstain completely from smoking without it causing them harm. The same can't be said for people wanting to lose weight.

    I still don't agree with this willpower guff. I have said many times before, most people who have lost weight and gained it and lost it and gained it have masses of willpower. Biology takes over at the point of restriction. And just because there is a small minority that can control their weight by calorie restriction, doesn't mean it's 'simple'..the point I have tried to make numerous times.

    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1765639640365420&substory_ind ex=0&id=1578310945764958

    http://peacefuleating.co.uk/what-to-do-when-everyone-around-you-is-talking-about-diets/

    http://peacefuleating.co.uk/why-diets-dont-work-the-brain/
    Last edited by Anoneemoose; 20-10-2016 at 8:36 AM.
    • Money maker
    • By Money maker 20th Oct 16, 12:27 PM
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    Money maker
    Also, smokers can abstain completely from smoking without it causing them harm. The same can't be said for people wanting to lose weight.
    Originally posted by Anoneemoose
    I do not agree with this at all. Both can reap many more health benefits by using choice and will power.
    Please do not quote spam as this enables it to 'live on' once the spam post is removed.

    If you quote me, don't forget the capital 'M'

    Declutterers of the world - unite!
    • Anoneemoose
    • By Anoneemoose 20th Oct 16, 2:00 PM
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    Anoneemoose
    I do not agree with this at all. Both can reap many more health benefits by using choice and will power.
    Originally posted by Money maker
    How can you not agree with fact. A smoker can completely give up smoking without detriment. People can't completely give up eating without killing themselves.

    And I will say yet again, will power has chuff all to do with it long term, and therefore in reality. I (and 95% of dieters) have had 'willpower' many times before and lost weight, but then biology and the brain take over. If I am so wrong, why is the amount of obese people rising?

    In addition:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minnesota_Starvation_Experiment
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