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  • FIRST POST
    • LizEstelle
    • By LizEstelle 14th Sep 16, 5:46 PM
    • 1,529Posts
    • 1,471Thanks
    LizEstelle
    Moving a relative to a home - BADLY need advice!
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 16, 5:46 PM
    Moving a relative to a home - BADLY need advice! 14th Sep 16 at 5:46 PM
    I can't see any better forum to post this on, sorry.

    I have a very elderly relative who has lived in his own home till now but the situation is now becoming impossible. Too complicated/embarrassing to explain.

    Is there anyone out there who knows the ins and outs of financial implications - social security/tax etc - of possibly finding a nursing/residential home for him?

    I admit to being totally in the dark about this and would hugely appreciate any pointers or advice you could give..
Page 2
    • securityguy
    • By securityguy 17th Sep 16, 10:49 PM
    • 2,046 Posts
    • 3,288 Thanks
    securityguy
    "If you mean suggesting to the relative they complete an enduring power of attorney"

    It's now a Lasting Power of Attorney. Enduring Powers of Attorney ceased to be available some years ago. Existing EPoAs are still valid, but the process for getting a new LPoA is somewhat different.
    • Alan Cross
    • By Alan Cross 20th Sep 16, 7:33 PM
    • 915 Posts
    • 871 Thanks
    Alan Cross
    Sorry to hijack the thread but I see nobody's posted for a few days anyway.

    I was wondering whether, as I've heard, it's possible to 'bargain' with care homes for a lower fee than the one they quote up front.

    I'm in the same position with trying to find a place for an aged relative who will be self-funding. Up till now I've simply taken it as read that the price homes quote is set in stone - but a few I've visited quite clearly have rooms available which they've not been able to fill for some time.

    Has anyone heard of 'haggling' being successful?
    • elsien
    • By elsien 20th Sep 16, 7:36 PM
    • 13,680 Posts
    • 33,213 Thanks
    elsien
    Sorry to hijack the thread but I see nobody's posted for a few days anyway.

    I was wondering whether, as I've heard, it's possible to 'bargain' with care homes for a lower fee than the one they quote up front.

    I'm in the same position with trying to find a place for an aged relative who will be self-funding. Up till now I've simply taken it as read that the price homes quote is set in stone - but a few I've visited quite clearly have rooms available which they've not been able to fill for some time.

    Has anyone heard of 'haggling' being successful?
    Originally posted by Alan Cross
    Local authorities do it when self funders money runs out, to try to avoid the person having to be uprooted to move somewhere cheaper. They possibly have a little more clout though than a solitary individual.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • chubster
    • By chubster 8th Oct 16, 8:53 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    chubster
    financial liability of LPA
    Due to a complication situation (as this type of thing often is) I am taking on lasting power of attorney for my Dad (property and finance). I can't find the answer to this question anywhere - if Dad goes into a care home and self funds, if/when he runs out of money am I liable for paying for his care home? It's not a situation that will hopefully happen in the near future but I am unsure what my liabilities are if I take on LPA. Thanks for any help.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 8th Oct 16, 9:00 PM
    • 13,680 Posts
    • 33,213 Thanks
    elsien
    You or other relatives may be asked to pay a top up. This is nothing to do with the POA, and there is no obligation for you to agree. The POA doesn't make you liable for his costs out of your own money.
    Otherwise, if the home is more expensive than the LA amount and agreement can't be reached with the home to agree a lower figure then dad might have to move. LAs will pay some top up but it won't be a lot and probably varies between areas.

    https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/paying-your-own-care-costs-but-the-moneys-run-out
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • troubleinparadise
    • By troubleinparadise 9th Oct 16, 12:56 AM
    • 864 Posts
    • 1,469 Thanks
    troubleinparadise
    Due to a complication situation (as this type of thing often is) I am taking on lasting power of attorney for my Dad (property and finance). I can't find the answer to this question anywhere - if Dad goes into a care home and self funds, if/when he runs out of money am I liable for paying for his care home? It's not a situation that will hopefully happen in the near future but I am unsure what my liabilities are if I take on LPA. Thanks for any help.
    Originally posted by chubster
    Should your father go into residential care, read the contract carefully to check there isn't a clause which says that you will pay the fees should his funding run out. The contracts can be long and wordy, so worth taking time over.

    The normal situation is that the LA would take over funding your father's care if/when his funds run out - but that might not be where he is residing at that time should the fees exceed what the LA will pay. And of course the funding on offer may change by that time.

    LPA gives you the power to handle the donor's assets on their behalf in their best interests, but it does not make you financially responsible for the donor from your own funds. Always read anything that you might have to sign on the donor's behalf very carefully.

    Keep good records of what is spent with receipts - it is easy to keep track of as you go along, harder to sort out later if needed and it's all a muddle!
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