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  • FIRST POST
    • martin2345uk
    • By martin2345uk 10th Sep 16, 9:50 AM
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    martin2345uk
    "Your email address has been stolen" email from Garlik Datapatrol
    • #1
    • 10th Sep 16, 9:50 AM
    "Your email address has been stolen" email from Garlik Datapatrol 10th Sep 16 at 9:50 AM
    My mums just sent me a panicky email as she's received a mail with the above subject from this Garlik company saying she needs to log into to Datapatrol account to check what's happened.

    My first instinct is that it's a scam but this company does seem to be legit, and well it wouldn't be out of character for my mum to sign up for stuff without knowing what she's doing.

    Any thoughts..?
Page 1
    • Fightsback
    • By Fightsback 10th Sep 16, 10:23 AM
    • 2,213 Posts
    • 1,237 Thanks
    Fightsback
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 16, 10:23 AM
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 16, 10:23 AM
    I always treat this kind of mail as potential scam, never click any links in the email and if your mum wishes to confirm the information then go directly to their website through a browser. Fishing scam attacks go to great lengths to appear as if they are from a genuine company.

    http://www.garlik.com/datapatrol

    Garlik is owned by Experian

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Experian

    Recently there have been widespread releases of personal data from services such as hotbox, linkedin etc and that your mum's email may be on that list.

    Find out if your Mum has genuinely signed up for the service.
    Science isn't exact, it's only confidence within limits.
    • martin2345uk
    • By martin2345uk 10th Sep 16, 10:26 AM
    • 604 Posts
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    martin2345uk
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 16, 10:26 AM
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 16, 10:26 AM
    Thank you. What does it mean exactly if your email address gets stolen?! If you change your password wouldn't that stop people using it?
    • Fightsback
    • By Fightsback 10th Sep 16, 10:28 AM
    • 2,213 Posts
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    Fightsback
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 16, 10:28 AM
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 16, 10:28 AM
    Thank you. What does it mean exactly if your email address gets stolen?! If you change your password wouldn't that stop people using it?
    Originally posted by martin2345uk
    People are often lazy using easy to crack password hashes or reuse the same password for everything.

    for example:

    http://arstechnica.com/security/2016/08/dropbox-hackers-stole-email-addresses-hashed-passwords-68m-accounts/
    Science isn't exact, it's only confidence within limits.
    • martin2345uk
    • By martin2345uk 10th Sep 16, 10:33 AM
    • 604 Posts
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    martin2345uk
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 16, 10:33 AM
    • #5
    • 10th Sep 16, 10:33 AM
    Yeah I need to get her to use a better password!!

    Oh, turns out she did sign up with them a long time ago!!
    • victor2
    • By victor2 10th Sep 16, 11:39 AM
    • 4,455 Posts
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    victor2
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 16, 11:39 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Sep 16, 11:39 AM
    Garlik services are now offered free with DirectLine home insurance.
    I gave it very limited information, as I'm not prepared to dump all my personal details unnecessarily into a web server somewhere, and it came back with a warning that a LinkedIn security breach could have compromised my email. That breach was in 2012, although reports are that the hacked data has appeared for sale this year.
    It can be a pain, but I use different passwords for every site I register with (including Garlik) - and different email addresses in many cases.

    Garlik gives you the option to input all kinds of personal data - mobile phone number, NI number, passport number, bank account and credit card details. That type of information would be a gold mine for hackers and identity thieves. You have to have absolute faith that they keep your data secure...
    • jmc160
    • By jmc160 13th Sep 16, 12:21 PM
    • 718 Posts
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    jmc160
    • #7
    • 13th Sep 16, 12:21 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Sep 16, 12:21 PM
    Yeah I need to get her to use a better password!!

    Oh, turns out she did sign up with them a long time ago!!
    Originally posted by martin2345uk
    Not just one password, all passwords should be different..

    Check out password managers like LastPass or KeePass. Both have free options and allow you to generate and set up very secure passwords. You don't have to worry about remembering them, just use the extensions to autofill when visiting the sites.

    Also, you can check if your details have been compromised by entering your email address here:
    https://haveibeenpwned.com/
    Last edited by jmc160; 13-09-2016 at 12:21 PM. Reason: spelling
    The pen is mightier than the sword, and considerably easier to write with.
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    Marty Feldman
    • forgotmyname
    • By forgotmyname 13th Sep 16, 11:34 PM
    • 22,685 Posts
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    forgotmyname
    • #8
    • 13th Sep 16, 11:34 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Sep 16, 11:34 PM
    I tried that pwned link before and it found an old spammy email address and linked it to myspace, but it gets less spam that ones ive used on the comparison websites.
    Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar will be used sparingly. Due to rising costs of inflation.

    My contribution to MSE. Other contributions will only be used if they cost me nothing.

    Due to me being a tight git.
    • J B
    • By J B 14th Sep 16, 1:15 PM
    • 1,857 Posts
    • 585 Thanks
    J B
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 16, 1:15 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 16, 1:15 PM
    Also, you can check if your details have been compromised by entering your email address here:
    https://haveibeenpwned.com/
    Originally posted by jmc160
    Then .... when I get a positive answer .... what then??
    • Bigphil1474
    • By Bigphil1474 14th Sep 16, 1:48 PM
    • 515 Posts
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    Bigphil1474
    If you get a positive answer, log into that account, change your password, reset if applicable.
    My Netflix account got used by a-n-other (some bloke in Belgium apparently) earlier this year because my Myspace account from years ago that I'd stopped using had been compromised, and unfortunately had the same e-mail and password. Logged into Netflix, reset devices, changed the password, and no longer an issue. The blighter had even set himself up with his own user profile so it wasn't hard to spot. Mind you, in the early days I used to use the same password for everything. These days I use sticky notes to record all my passwords so I don't forget them, and nobody can see them unless they are logged in as me - saves me having to remember too many.
    • J B
    • By J B 14th Sep 16, 5:11 PM
    • 1,857 Posts
    • 585 Thanks
    J B
    If you get a positive answer, log into that account, change your password, reset if applicable.
    Originally posted by Bigphil1474
    Sorry - confused dot com - log into my email account and change the password???

    • victor2
    • By victor2 15th Sep 16, 9:07 AM
    • 4,455 Posts
    • 2,958 Thanks
    victor2
    Sorry - confused dot com - log into my email account and change the password???

    Originally posted by J B
    Assuming you are using, or have access to, an online "webmail" service, that is where you login and look for the option to change your password.
    If you are also using a client such as the built-in ones for Android, Apple and (some versions of) Windows, that will then need its password changing to your new one as well.
    • J B
    • By J B 15th Sep 16, 4:06 PM
    • 1,857 Posts
    • 585 Thanks
    J B
    Assuming you are using, or have access to, an online "webmail" service, that is where you login and look for the option to change your password.
    Originally posted by victor2
    Done - cheers

    If you are also using a client such as the built-in ones for Android, Apple and (some versions of) Windows, that will then need its password changing to your new one as well.
    Originally posted by victor2
    Thunderbird on W10 PC
    K9 Mail on Android phone and Kindle

    • janehp
    • By janehp 22nd Sep 16, 5:59 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    janehp
    Sorry I'm being dim!
    I used the site haveibeenpwned to check as my email was recently hacked and the site showed it was a linkedin account I set up years ago but have never used. My email password has always been different to any others but it is possible the linkedin password was one I used for a number of other sites and is still in use. (I know not a good idea and need to change them!)

    Is it the linkedin password they have obtained and/or my email password?

    Thanks
    • almillar
    • By almillar 23rd Sep 16, 4:06 PM
    • 6,394 Posts
    • 2,515 Thanks
    almillar
    It's the linkedin password they have. Obviously they could try it elsewhere, so you should change that password anywhere you use it. If your email password has always been different, it's safe.
    • AndyPix
    • By AndyPix 23rd Sep 16, 4:11 PM
    • 1,206 Posts
    • 674 Thanks
    AndyPix
    These days I use sticky notes to record all my passwords so I don't forget them, and nobody can see them unless they are logged in as me.
    Originally posted by Bigphil1474

    But all it takes is 5 minutes at your computer with a linux live usb and i have all your passwords :/
    Running with scissors since 1978
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