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  • FIRST POST
    • Stuart Kemp
    • By Stuart Kemp 25th Aug 16, 9:59 AM
    • 1Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Stuart Kemp
    Heron Global Partners acting as broker for Diamond Construction and Renewables
    • #1
    • 25th Aug 16, 9:59 AM
    Heron Global Partners acting as broker for Diamond Construction and Renewables 25th Aug 16 at 9:59 AM
    We have been contacted by the above with a view of investing in renewables i.e. wind farms.
    The interest rate they are quoting is very competitive. Has anyone heard of them or had dealings with them?
    Thanks
    Stuart Kemp
Page 1
    • dunstonh
    • By dunstonh 25th Aug 16, 10:09 AM
    • 89,840 Posts
    • 56,490 Thanks
    dunstonh
    • #2
    • 25th Aug 16, 10:09 AM
    • #2
    • 25th Aug 16, 10:09 AM
    Genuine regulated financial services companies do not cold call. They are not a genuine regulated financial services company.

    You cannot compare what they are offering to savings accounts paying interest. 100% loss potential with no FSCS protection being sold by an unregulated company.
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). Comments are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice. Different people have different needs and what is right for one person may not be for another. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
    • sarahemmm
    • By sarahemmm 25th Aug 16, 11:33 AM
    • 99 Posts
    • 87 Thanks
    sarahemmm
    • #3
    • 25th Aug 16, 11:33 AM
    • #3
    • 25th Aug 16, 11:33 AM
    I have just found out that this is the true name of a company apparently called Alternative Investing (www.alternative-investing.uk) which advertised in The Guardian today. I thought the website was dodgy, but I filled in the form and got an email reply from a Phil Walker:
    Hello Sarah XXXX,

    Thank you for your investment enquiry with our partner Alternative Investing.

    We will contact you as soon as we can to discuss how we can help you with your investment needs.

    If you would like to speak to us immeadiately, please call 0208 003 0694.

    We look forward to speaking with you.

    Regards,

    Phil Walker

    Head of Customer Services
    Heron Global Partners Ltd.
    150 Minories, City of London, United Kingdom, EC3N 1LS
    I will be very interested in their take on why they have a) several company names, b) don't display the true name on the website, c) seem to offer different rates of return depending on which section of the website you are on.
    • dunstonh
    • By dunstonh 25th Aug 16, 11:54 AM
    • 89,840 Posts
    • 56,490 Thanks
    dunstonh
    • #4
    • 25th Aug 16, 11:54 AM
    • #4
    • 25th Aug 16, 11:54 AM
    If you look at the most common scams that are currently taking place, they utilise multiple companies. By creating extra hops they can all dney liability and make it harder for investigators. Often in the chain there is a company that is based overseas just to make it more complicated.

    We will contact you as soon as we can to discuss how we can help you with your investment needs.
    Which they are not authorised or regulated to do in the UK. They use unregulated areas. Most of which are totally unsuitable for the average UK consumer.

    Again, if you look at the scams or investment failures that are going on, they are virtually all unregulated. And that is for good reason. If you wanted to peddle dodgy things, you would not become regulated. This is not to say all unregulated areas are bad. However, there are a number of things to look out for
    1 - use of only unregulated investments and the promotor/seller is also unregulated (that means no controls or consumer protection exists at any stage)
    2 - use of multiple companies in the process.
    3 - New company recently set up
    4 - directors have track record of very many companies. Even more on guard if those companies have short lives (i.e. set up, short period of scamming and shut down again before anyone takes an interest and then phoenix under a new name and repeat.
    5 - Operates under a virtual office (which for reference this company do). Whilst there are plenty of genuine companies that use virtual offices, it is frequently the case with scams and dodgy arrangements as it hides their real location. It is usually used to make them sound more impressive than they are. e.g. a student operating out of a top floor flat in Southend could have a posh address in London if they used a virtual office.

    The above is a guide for caution. It is possible that all those things could occur and the company be genuine and fair. A lot of genuine companies will also use one or more of those things. They are just risk warnings for what the scam/dodgy things usually do and to put you on guard. The more that apply, the more on guard you should be.
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). Comments are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice. Different people have different needs and what is right for one person may not be for another. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
    • sarahemmm
    • By sarahemmm 25th Aug 16, 12:46 PM
    • 99 Posts
    • 87 Thanks
    sarahemmm
    • #5
    • 25th Aug 16, 12:46 PM
    Serviced offices!
    • #5
    • 25th Aug 16, 12:46 PM
    150 Minories is a serviced office:

    https://www.beoffices.com/servicedoffice-locations/london-city/minories
    • sarahemmm
    • By sarahemmm 25th Aug 16, 12:48 PM
    • 99 Posts
    • 87 Thanks
    sarahemmm
    • #6
    • 25th Aug 16, 12:48 PM
    • #6
    • 25th Aug 16, 12:48 PM
    By filling in your details you are now on a suckers list and will be getting a lot more calls like these.
    Originally posted by Malthusian
    I'm sure you are right. However, it has allowed me to inform others, and hopefully fewer people will be taken in if they do a fairly small amount of googling.
    Last edited by sarahemmm; 25-08-2016 at 12:48 PM. Reason: clarity
    • dunstonh
    • By dunstonh 25th Aug 16, 1:30 PM
    • 89,840 Posts
    • 56,490 Thanks
    dunstonh
    • #7
    • 25th Aug 16, 1:30 PM
    • #7
    • 25th Aug 16, 1:30 PM
    Originally posted by sarahemmm
    It is also a virtual office:
    https://www.beoffices.com/our-products/virtual-offices/virtual-office-locations/london-city
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). Comments are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice. Different people have different needs and what is right for one person may not be for another. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
    • jimjames
    • By jimjames 10th Jan 17, 8:52 AM
    • 12,234 Posts
    • 10,760 Thanks
    jimjames
    • #8
    • 10th Jan 17, 8:52 AM
    Alternative Investments aka UK Heron Global Partners LTD
    • #8
    • 10th Jan 17, 8:52 AM
    An update on this one. I saw an ad on an online newspaper offering returns up to 9% so clicked to find out more. Despite several pages and details of very impressive promised returns it was only in the very small print after lots of scrolling that the disclaimer appeared that it was for high net worth individuals only.
    Very concerning that this can be hidden so far away from the return and isn't the first thing that has to be shown on the website
    Remember the saying: if it looks too good to be true it almost certainly is.
    • jimjames
    • By jimjames 15th Jan 17, 10:46 AM
    • 12,234 Posts
    • 10,760 Thanks
    jimjames
    • #9
    • 15th Jan 17, 10:46 AM
    • #9
    • 15th Jan 17, 10:46 AM
    This was the ad page that popped up on my PC. For somerthing that is aimed at high net worth investors and not at retail investors it seems rather odd that it mentions "low entry level" and worryingly no mention of risks in the bullet points.
    Remember the saying: if it looks too good to be true it almost certainly is.
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 15th Jan 17, 11:19 AM
    • 6,981 Posts
    • 12,569 Thanks
    bowlhead99
    Nothing wrong with that. It says "Why an alternative investment" and gives some reasons why you might want an alternative investment. It is clearly not a list of Why NOT an alternative investment. The bullet points suit the headline.

    If you click to learn more, you can learn other useful things, like why you might not want an alternative investment (which in your case, you already know)...

    Investments of all risk categories can have low entry levels. As a sophisticated investor I might still want something I can throw a few thousand into, rather than for example a private hedge fund with minimum subscription of £250k. The fact that you can put small amounts of money into it does not automatically mean you should buy it if you only have small amounts of money.
    • Tonyclarke
    • By Tonyclarke 15th Mar 17, 9:01 AM
    • 4 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    Tonyclarke
    Heron Global put me in touch with Diamond Group who wanted to raise £3 million in a mini bond offering paying 8%+ per annum through a subsidiary company named Diamond Construction and Renewables. The money was to be used to acquire 3 sites in Scotland to build wind farms on each. The first coupon date was 6.06.16 and this payment was met. The second coupon date was 6.01.2017 and this date was not met. The Directors of the Diamond Group, ***Names removed by forum team***, went missing and did not respond on any of their contact numbers or addresses. I did some research and found that one of the wind farm sites - Dare Duff Hill in Ayrshire- they promised to acquire with the £3million had been rejected for planning consent 3 months before they launched the mini bond offer. In other words, they knew they could not build a wind farm on this site but still went ahead with the mini bond offer, using the services of Heron Global. Other equally puzzling discrepancies between the Prospectus and actions on the ground have come to light. During January and February 2017, Diamond have been subject to a series of Freezing Orders from their bank, and legal actions from investors, seeking either their overdue coupon payments, or the return of their investment. Heron have tried to distance themselves from the matter. Legal proceedings are ongoing.
    Last edited by MSE ForumTeam1; 24-10-2017 at 8:32 PM. Reason: Personal details removed by Forum team
    • TheoC
    • By TheoC 20th Mar 17, 7:33 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    TheoC
    Heron Global
    My heart sank when I saw these posts. Is there anything to be done to retrieve money from these people?



    If you look at the most common scams that are currently taking





    place, they utilise multiple companies. By creating extra hops they can all dney liability and make it harder for investigators. Often in the chain there is a company that is based overseas just to make it more complicated.



    Which they are not authorised or regulated to do in the UK. They use unregulated areas. Most of which are totally unsuitable for the average UK consumer.

    Again, if you look at the scams or investment failures that are going on, they are virtually all unregulated. And that is for good reason. If you wanted to peddle dodgy things, you would not become regulated. This is not to say all unregulated areas are bad. However, there are a number of things to look out for
    1 - use of only unregulated investments and the promotor/seller is also unregulated (that means no controls or consumer protection exists at any stage)
    2 - use of multiple companies in the process.
    3 - New company recently set up
    4 - directors have track record of very many companies. Even more on guard if those companies have short lives (i.e. set up, short period of scamming and shut down again before anyone takes an interest and then phoenix under a new name and repeat.
    5 - Operates under a virtual office (which for reference this company do). Whilst there are plenty of genuine companies that use virtual offices, it is frequently the case with scams and dodgy arrangements as it hides their real location. It is usually used to make them sound more impressive than they are. e.g. a student operating out of a top floor flat in Southend could have a posh address in London if they used a virtual office.

    The above is a guide for caution. It is possible that all those things could occur and the company be genuine and fair. A lot of genuine companies will also use one or more of those things. They are just risk warnings for what the scam/dodgy things usually do and to put you on guard. The more that apply, the more on guard you should be.
    Originally posted by dunstonh
    • Reaper
    • By Reaper 20th Mar 17, 8:57 AM
    • 6,150 Posts
    • 4,387 Thanks
    Reaper
    My heart sank when I saw these posts. Is there anything to be done to retrieve money from these people?
    Originally posted by TheoC
    It depends whether it is a scam or a genuine failed business. If the latter they may still have some assets. If their banks have frozen their accounts as described by Tonyclarke there might be something but typically with these sort of cases the owners vanish, there are no assets, and the police are unlikely to investigate. You should write off your money and beware being cold call contacted by another company saying they can recover your money - it will turn out to require an up front fee and you will end up losing more.
    • jimjames
    • By jimjames 20th Mar 17, 1:23 PM
    • 12,234 Posts
    • 10,760 Thanks
    jimjames
    My heart sank when I saw these posts. Is there anything to be done to retrieve money from these people?
    Originally posted by TheoC
    It really depends what you've put money into, when and how. If you're early enough in the cycle you may find you can extract money as they don't want the bad publicity being around to put others off.

    However, what exactly have you signed up to and invested in? If you agreed to a 5 year term for example then you may struggle to get money out after 6 months.
    Remember the saying: if it looks too good to be true it almost certainly is.
    • Brenat124
    • By Brenat124 9th Apr 17, 6:41 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Brenat124
    I am in a similar position regarding this investment. Now that I have a lot more information from this thread, I will fight to get my money back!
    • Gadfium
    • By Gadfium 9th Apr 17, 9:13 AM
    • 628 Posts
    • 1,169 Thanks
    Gadfium
    Threads like this always makes me question my life decisions. Why am I going to work in corporate life every day, facing the daily grind, dealing with traffic, customers and management and all that goes with it for a monthly salary??? The country seems to be full of, shall we say, less suspicious people than me* that seem happy to throw money at a fancy webpage or glossy adverts in the shallower tributaries of the press in the hopes of getting a ridiculous rate of return. As far as I can see, what I should be doing is renting a Post Office box number in a serviced office block, spend a few £grand on a fancy webpage and some advertising, set up some shell companies and sit back and wait for the less suspicious than me* to chuck money at me.

    Then I remember that I am honest and am not prepared to scam and fleece people for a quick buck. Maybe I need to rethink my lifeplan.....




    *gullible
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 9th Apr 17, 11:03 AM
    • 6,981 Posts
    • 12,569 Thanks
    bowlhead99

    Then I remember that I am honest and am not prepared to scam and fleece people for a quick buck. Maybe I need to rethink my lifeplan.....
    Originally posted by Gadfium
    Although technology advances have allowed huge swathes of dodgy websites and spam emails to come into being - at least with so much information at your fingertips about what legitimate regulated investments look like these days it should be more difficult to get caught unawares. The connected-ness and online-everything these days gives you more time in your life for proper research and much easier interaction with legit businesses so you don't need to fall for cold callers and dodgy ads.

    Back in the day the unscrupulous types could just put a small ad in the papers for something innocuous via mail order, not deliver it, and wait for someone to demand a refund. Then refund their claim with the cheque marked in large bold print "Refund for your Bonerpillz(tm) which failed to grow your micropenis", safe in the knowledge that the customer would not want to go along to the cashier at his small-town bank branch and present the cheque to get his money back. Less likely to work these days because the customer can just stick the cheque in a machine-reader and have the £20 credited without interacting with another human.

    So, certain types of scams are naturally dying off and being replaced by new evolutions of con-artistry. But the old ones - such as 'give me money for an investment that I might not actually make' or 'give me money with a guaranteed return which I will pay out for the first few years using the deposited money from new suckers while skimming off your capital for myself' - have been going since well before Mr Ponzi made them famous almost a hundred years ago.

    - PS I have no direct experience of Bonerpillz(tm) nor micropenises so cannot vouch for their efficacy or otherwise; twas just an example.
    • Gadfium
    • By Gadfium 9th Apr 17, 5:58 PM
    • 628 Posts
    • 1,169 Thanks
    Gadfium
    - PS I have no direct experience of Bonerpillz(tm) nor micropenises so cannot vouch for their efficacy or otherwise; twas just an example.
    Originally posted by bowlhead99
    The lady doth protest too much, methinks. C'mon Bowlhead....come clean. We all know that you still have that cheque tucked away somewhere...
    • TheoC
    • By TheoC 14th Apr 17, 8:16 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    TheoC
    Bar Works USA
    This investment is also being sold by Heron Global.
    BEWARE - it looks like another scam.
    • Tcquins
    • By Tcquins 14th Apr 17, 8:51 AM
    • 12 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    Tcquins
    A simple rule- if an investment provider (of questionable reputation) is promising an interest rate of 7-10%, it's highly likely to go bust or be a scam- guaranteed returns of this nature are just total BS- stay away.
    Caveat Emptor!
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