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  • FIRST POST
    • kerri gt
    • By kerri gt 26th Jul 16, 9:44 PM
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    kerri gt
    Replacing Skirting board
    • #1
    • 26th Jul 16, 9:44 PM
    Replacing Skirting board 26th Jul 16 at 9:44 PM
    We recently moved house and although not originally on our hit list are now discussing replacing the skirting board in our living room. Its 15' x 13' with a chimney breast and box window.

    I don't know what the current skirting is fixed on with - I'm hoping Gripfil rather than skirting nails.

    Money isn't exactly unlimited atm so I'm not sure whether it would be worth getting someone in to do the job or trying to do it (carefully) ourselves.

    Does anyone have any rough ballpark estimates of how much it might be and who I should be contacting - general DIY'r / joiner etc?

    TIA
    Feb 2015 NSD Challenge 8/12
    JAN NSD 11/16


Page 1
    • usman330
    • By usman330 26th Jul 16, 9:51 PM
    • 87 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    usman330
    • #2
    • 26th Jul 16, 9:51 PM
    • #2
    • 26th Jul 16, 9:51 PM
    You could take it off yourself but be careful as it may rip off plaster above it as it comes off and then depending on the damage it it may need a light skim of plaster to blend back in or more heavy plastering which in turn needs time to dry. Might come off pretty clean though and just need a bit of filler.

    I would use a joiner or someone who is skilled with working with wood if your doing the whole house. It needs some skill to cut the corners and mitre the edges of the skirting.

    So I would probably take it all off, do prep work and clean up, and just hire a joiner for a day at £120 - £150 day rate to come and do the skilled bit which is putting the new skirting up
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 27th Jul 16, 9:45 AM
    • 3,048 Posts
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    Hoploz
    • #3
    • 27th Jul 16, 9:45 AM
    • #3
    • 27th Jul 16, 9:45 AM
    I would do it myself, esp as only one room. I'd rip it off and direct hubby to do the cutting for the new - that's how we roll

    For a couple of reasons - first, we can never seem to find anyone to do a job, they either don't turn up to look at the job, or don't get back to us with a price.

    And secondly, if we do manage to get a job done, it's either left with a frustratingly poor standard, or unfinished for us to do to the standard we want.

    And if it is a small job like this, it's even worse getting someone to do it.

    For example, I've been waiting since March to get two walls wallpapered in two rooms. A day's work at most. Have had two people round to see the job/quote. Neither have bothered giving me a price/ are too busy to bother fitting the job in.
    • Rain Shadow
    • By Rain Shadow 27th Jul 16, 9:58 AM
    • 1,412 Posts
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    Rain Shadow
    • #4
    • 27th Jul 16, 9:58 AM
    • #4
    • 27th Jul 16, 9:58 AM
    I would do it myself, esp as only one room. I'd rip it off and direct hubby to do the cutting for the new - that's how we roll

    For a couple of reasons - first, we can never seem to find anyone to do a job, they either don't turn up to look at the job, or don't get back to us with a price.

    And secondly, if we do manage to get a job done, it's either left with a frustratingly poor standard, or unfinished for us to do to the standard we want.

    And if it is a small job like this, it's even worse getting someone to do it.

    For example, I've been waiting since March to get two walls wallpapered in two rooms. A day's work at most. Have had two people round to see the job/quote. Neither have bothered giving me a price/ are too busy to bother fitting the job in.
    Originally posted by Hoploz

    I've done skirting boards and they aren't too tricky so I'd do them myself too.

    And, do the wallpapering yourself. It's easy, and you don't exactly need a lot of equipment.

    I agree about availability of tradesmen. They aren't too interested in small domestic jobs, and tbh you can't blame them.
    • dermonte
    • By dermonte 27th Jul 16, 4:15 PM
    • 149 Posts
    • 67 Thanks
    dermonte
    • #5
    • 27th Jul 16, 4:15 PM
    • #5
    • 27th Jul 16, 4:15 PM
    I agree that its so hard to find a tradesmen. Once I wanted a socket on my hallway and electrician didnt turn up when he said he would. We had a leak after accidently nailing the pipe but couldnt find a plummer who was willing to come considering it was emergency too. I had to call my house insurance in the end. We got our skirting boards replaced by our joiner who also fitted our kitchen. Seemed easy if you have the skills.
    • anotheruser
    • By anotheruser 27th Jul 16, 9:03 PM
    • 2,300 Posts
    • 1,429 Thanks
    anotheruser
    • #6
    • 27th Jul 16, 9:03 PM
    • #6
    • 27th Jul 16, 9:03 PM
    What would people's advice be for dog-knawed skirting going up the stairs?

    We have some that has been bitten away so it's got some holes in it. I'd like to think I could 'fill' it in, make it look the same shape, then paint the whole thing.

    The other thought would be to cut out that section and buy more of the same, then slot it in and paint the whole thing.

    Any advice?
    Sorry no photos as yet.
    • kerri gt
    • By kerri gt 27th Jul 16, 10:24 PM
    • 6,996 Posts
    • 44,008 Thanks
    kerri gt
    • #7
    • 27th Jul 16, 10:24 PM
    • #7
    • 27th Jul 16, 10:24 PM
    Just wanted to say thank you to folks for their replies - we're going to draw up an 'order' list at the weekend in terms of bringing forward some painting we were going to do if the skirting is coming off and the like.

    I think we will try and remove the skirting ourselves then have a joiner fit the new stuff to ensure its (hopefully) done well. I'm going to try and get some quotes before doing anything though in case there's not much cost difference between removing the skirting ourselves and just paying to have the new stuff put on vs letting someone do the whole job.
    Feb 2015 NSD Challenge 8/12
    JAN NSD 11/16


    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 28th Jul 16, 6:35 AM
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    getmore4less
    • #8
    • 28th Jul 16, 6:35 AM
    • #8
    • 28th Jul 16, 6:35 AM
    If removing skirting that's the time to look at flooring.

    If planning to change bring if forward if going hard.
    • cyclonebri1
    • By cyclonebri1 28th Jul 16, 9:27 AM
    • 12,475 Posts
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    cyclonebri1
    • #9
    • 28th Jul 16, 9:27 AM
    • #9
    • 28th Jul 16, 9:27 AM
    Consider carefully the type of skirting chosen and the size.

    I'd go for something slightly higher than existing so you can score the plaster before removing and cover the score with the wider board. Hopefully any damaged plaster, and I guarantee some will come off, is then below skirting height and can be "amaturely repaired".

    Choice of material matters, most joiners fit MDF these days, but for a kitchen or conservatory, anywhere with hard floors it's not suitable. One good wetting and it's replacement time again.
    Natural timber is a bit more expensive and needs more finishing, can be a little out of straight so I'm guessing that's why the pro's push it because it's easier to make a good job. It's the longevity and fitness for purpose that would be my main concern it my own home
    I like the thanks button, but ,please, an I agree button.

    Will the grammar and spelling police respect I do make grammatical errors, and have carp spelling, no need to remind me.

    Always expect the unexpectedand then you won't be dissapointed
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 28th Jul 16, 10:41 AM
    • 5,944 Posts
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    DigForVictory
    Skirting on stairs is a chore to saw but once done is sorted - patching repairs is a bane.
    Replacing skirting is honestly not that hard - B&Q have helpful leaflets & *I* would try to arrange for the unscrewable sort so you can remove for repainting/repolishing, change & or seriously scrub carpeting & give yourself a bit more latitude. Going a bit higher is very shrewd if you're uncertain about the plaster.
    I've seen loads of mitre boxes (of varying complexity) on car boots, so the "specialist tools" are available & usually affordable.
    Modern skirting often has one design along one side & another on the flip so don't panic if you have 6 planks & 2 patterns, until you've turned them over like playing cards...
    • kerri gt
    • By kerri gt 18th Oct 16, 10:01 PM
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    kerri gt
    So, just a quick update on my original question. We ended up choosing a new design of skirting to what was originally in the room, and slightly higher than what was existing...this then meant that several of the electric sockets needed to either be moved up the walls, or have the skirting cut round them. We decided on the former.

    In the end we got professionals in to do it, quote from a decorating company who also put us in touch with a sparky for the electrics.
    • Three double sockets moved up the walls, three with just the face plates changed (I asked if he had 5mins to do this while he was here), Few additional holes in the walls filled and made good
    • Couple of other light cracks in another wall filled / painted (it was along lines where a doorway had previously been filled),
    • Piece flooring that was missing fixed
    • New skirting which we ordered incl one rebated to hide the internet cable - cannot recommend www.skirting4u.co.uk highly enough)
    • Feature wall painted
    • Windowsill repainted

    It took some time to get the guys in as they were busy with outdoor jobs while the weather was good but all in all I'm glad we did get someone in just to get it done much faster, and with less stress than if we'd have done it ourselves.

    Cost was £120 for the sparky, and £520 for the decorators (who were here over the course of 3 days) excl cost of the skirting.
    Feb 2015 NSD Challenge 8/12
    JAN NSD 11/16


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