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    • maryb
    • By maryb 18th Oct 16, 12:17 PM
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    maryb
    Cooler, not necessarily cold, perhaps? After all we have had some mild winters.

    Really sorry you are struggling with the gallbladder, Mar. It's the last thing you need on top of your other health worries. A good idea to have a hospital bag, though.
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 18th Oct 16, 1:28 PM
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    Karmacat
    Not liking the sound of "colder" ... your cold is my intense cold up here. I need to start panic buying. I need to get the energy to panic first lol.
    My winter preps are going to include a hospital stay I think - another night of pain with gallstones, it finally eased at 5am. Maybe pack a hospital bag just in case.
    Originally posted by mardatha
    So sorry to hear that, mar, being kept awake by pain must be horrible. A hospital bag sounds like a very good prep.

    I read the same Daily Wail report, and like MaryB I remember "cooler" - it was noticeable in the Wail because they *weren't* headlining snowmageddon. But yours will still be cold you're so far north of us.

    I'm endlessly cutting back the overgrown cherry laurel at the bottom of my tiny garden, trying to avoid the charge of hundreds of pounds to get it cleared. And while I'm doing it, I'm thinking (partly) about the whole thing of, what if today was the day the electrical grid went bang, or The Big Meteorite landed and wiped out half the planet and sent the rest of it into the astronomical equivalent of a nuclear winter? It's just cause my brain is whirring, thats all, but it made me think - with being ill for ages, my "garden" is a complete mess, these laurel are over 25 feet high and could be dangerous if they get much higher. Lots of maintenance type jobs like that haven't been done for ages, because even researching and employing workmen has been beyond me.

    All I'm thinking of is that it really puts me on the back foot, if any sort of genuine emergency were to happen. Even if the emergency was about my mum, and I had to move to hers for a while for hospital visiting etc. The more I think of it, the more important it seems to be to keep more or less up to date with maintenance type things (don't you just love the detail in that statement?)...
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    • westcoastscot
    • By westcoastscot 18th Oct 16, 4:09 PM
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    westcoastscot
    Well it's already significantly cooler here - in single figures - and we've had a couple of days of ground frost, although too windy just now. I'm liking the sound of dryer though - it's constantly raining here and when the temperature drops and the wind picks up you really feel it!

    Mar we keep a hospital bag ready - clothes, something to eat, decent tea bags and something to do! A charged phone is useful, plus phone numbers, and writing paper/notecards and stamps are useful too. Hope you get it sorted out soon
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 18th Oct 16, 4:21 PM
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    GreyQueen
    Sorry to hear about your gallbladder woes, mar, I've heard worse-than-childbirth as a description from women who've done both.

    Karmakat, one of the things which is brought home to me in the kind of work I do, is how complicated the built environment is. On any given week, we can have collapses in the highway, flooding, broken water mains, missing manhole covers and lots of things like trees or tree limbs down. That's just daily wear-and-tear.

    Keeping a built environment up to scratch, whether on a micro scale of a personal residence and garden, or a macro scale of a city, or a road network, requires constant vigilence. And being willing to monitor, and act asap to relieve problems.

    I will tell you a little story from RL which demonstrates how a bit of timely action could've saved a world of hurt.

    One upon a time, a seed came off a tree and landed on stony ground.

    Actually, less biblically, a wych elm seed landed in a raised flowerbed, just under a meter wide. This is a tree which can grow up to 40 meters tall. It was stuck in a flowerbed about 2 ft above street level, beside a large brick gate pillar belonging to a 3 story victorian town house.

    The tree grew. For the first several years, tugging it out of there would have been the work of seconds. The house was in the same ownership all those years, and it was right by the front door. But the owners didn't act.

    The wych elm got bigger. Unable to grow a proper root system due to its position in the raised flowerbed, it grew its roots down the flowerbed, parallel to the road. It started to push against the brick gate pillar. Its roots heaved up the path from the pavement to the steps into the house. It went through the low walls dividing the townhouse from the townhouses on either side. It broke their mortar bonds and screwed their bricks out of line. It caused the retaining wall between the flowerbed and the pavement to bulge outwards.

    It ended up taller than the three-story townhouse and had so distorted the drainage at the front of the property that rain ran backwards towards the house, flooding the basement. Eventually, it had to be cut down by two tree surgeons. The road had to be closed for most of the day to accomodate it (main road in a city) and the expense was eye-watering.

    The tree surgeon counted the rings and the wych elm was 33 years old when they felled it. They poisoned the stump. It didn't kill it and it and the roots are still there and still suckering.

    All for the want of a few seconds' timely action tugging out a seedling tree.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 18th Oct 16, 4:53 PM
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    mardatha
    It's not so much that I am a lot further north, WCS is far further north than me - but I'm on the edge of a moor at 1000ft. My garden is a month behind sea level at Edinburgh... it's the height. WCS you get raw damp cold and I get more intense dry cold. Either way it's bloody cauld lol.
    KC I'm sure you will get around to everything now that you are off, just take it bite by bite and keep on nibbling
    • Bigjenny
    • By Bigjenny 18th Oct 16, 5:15 PM
    • 487 Posts
    • 5,237 Thanks
    Bigjenny
    [QUOTE=GreyQueen;71473011] Sorry to hear about your gallbladder woes, mar, I've heard worse-than-childbirth as a description from women who've done both.

    As someone who's done both, on a scale of 1 to 10, its a 15
    "When one door closes another door opens; but we so often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door, that we do not see the ones which open for us" Alexander Graham Bell
    • jk0
    • By jk0 18th Oct 16, 5:29 PM
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    jk0
    Sympathy for the gallstone pain Mardatha.

    Had you eaten anything to bring it on? Even cream in a soup sets me off nowadays.
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 18th Oct 16, 6:22 PM
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    mardatha
    I didn't eat anything at all yesterday apart from home made veg soup jk0.
    If it happens again tonight then the RV is taking me right into hosp to get some morphine. Thank god for online shopping, it's made my life much easier.
    Watching BBC on Aberfan and remembering it as it happened. No way on earth you could prep for that, that's a good example of GQ's disaster waiting to happen, like the tree. Such strong brave people, your heart goes out to them eh.
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 18th Oct 16, 6:42 PM
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    Karmacat
    It's not so much that I am a lot further north, WCS is far further north than me - but I'm on the edge of a moor at 1000ft. My garden is a month behind sea level at Edinburgh... it's the height. WCS you get raw damp cold and I get more intense dry cold. Either way it's bloody cauld lol.
    Originally posted by mardatha
    Bloody cauld is an accurate description, absolutely! And I keep forgetting about the height! I grew up on a hill immediately off the North Sea - only 300 feet high, that hill, but omigod, the wind. Sooooo cold! And no central heating in those days, as you know

    KC I'm sure you will get around to everything now that you
    are off, just take it bite by bite and keep on nibbling
    I like nibbling in that context and you're dead right, Mar

    Karmakat, one of the things which is brought home to me in the kind of work I do, is how complicated the built environment is. On any given week, we can have collapses in the highway, flooding, broken water mains, missing manhole covers and lots of things like trees or tree limbs down. That's just daily wear-and-tear.

    Keeping a built environment up to scratch, whether on a micro scale of a personal residence and garden, or a macro scale of a city, or a road network, requires constant vigilence. And being willing to monitor, and act asap to relieve problems....
    Originally posted by GreyQueen


    I've kept my eye on a few trees in my time, but these are far enough away from the house that they got away from me, so to speak. Maintenance of the built environment, as you so accurately call it, is impressed upon me all the time nowadays - mostly because I've ignored it whenever I can in the past . But if I'm going to stay here, I need to catch up with taking care of it.

    If it happens again tonight then the RV is taking me right into hosp to get some morphine.
    Originally posted by mardatha
    Gentle hugs, Mar, for someone like you to be contemplating morphine means a lot.

    Watching BBC on Aberfan and remembering it as it happened. No way on earth you could prep for that, that's a good example of GQ's disaster waiting to happen, like the tree. Such strong brave people, your heart goes out to them eh.
    I remember it too - most of those kids were a year younger than me, I'd just gone to the local high school and they never got the chance

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    • westcoastscot
    • By westcoastscot 18th Oct 16, 8:11 PM
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    westcoastscot
    Dreadful - I well recall it and was only 6 at the time, and living in a pit village in Yorkshire - such a tragedy. You really can't prep for something like that.
    Yes we're wet, cold and windy - in the gulf stream so not so much snow but flipping cold! I grew up in Yorkshire Mar on the moors, and well remember Dad having to climb out of the downstairs window to shovel the snow from the front door. I was disappointed when I moved to Scotland in '85 that the west coast was so mild - but happy for it now!!!!

    Really hope you have a better night, but yes hasten off with the RV if it isn't you cannot go on like this, and it may prompt some urgent action.
    ((hugs))) WCS
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 18th Oct 16, 8:47 PM
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    GreyQueen
    Yeah, Aberfan. A guy my Dad worked with was one of the miners who dug the children out. He was heartbroken by it and quit mining and moved well away from Wales. There are some things you can't ever forget.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • milasavesmoney
    • By milasavesmoney 19th Oct 16, 4:24 AM
    • 1,600 Posts
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    milasavesmoney
    With regular labor I d say gall stones are worse. With back labor, not a chance in hell!
    Nov $69/$500 ~~ 3/6 EF #46 $11,273/$15,000 ~~ Xmas/Bday 2016 $3002/$6500 ~~ WL 2016 ~15 lb
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 19th Oct 16, 8:42 AM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Quick thought for the day. Just been reading an online newspaper article of the paper testing contactless cards to see if the details could be stolen by someone nearby. Result tended to equal that around 2"-4" away a thief could pick them up. People have much greater protection keeping their cards in purses within leather handbags (plastic or material bags give a lot less protection).

    One point made was that these contactless cards have a strip right round the outside edge and that breaking this strip means they will no longer operate as contactless ones and have to be used in the standard way (ie putting them in a machine and putting in pin number). The newspaper suggested chopping off the top right-hand corner to render the "contactless" function useless. I can't see that this would be a problem to paying in the normal way (ie inserting in machine) provided one put in the card untrimmed edge first.

    Me - when my bank sent me a new card and this time it was contactless - I was promptly on the phone telling them I'd chopped the card up and needed a new card please and, this time, it was to be a standard "contact" one (as it's predecessor had been). They were told my new card would remain a standard one - if I had to swop bank to make sure of the fact. They did promptly send out a new standard one - I'm still with the same bank
    The unexamined life is not worth living.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 20th Oct 16, 8:10 AM
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    GreyQueen
    Morning all.

    Just reading a ZH article about power outages and came across a very handy tip in the comments section which I'm gonna steal and thought you might like to know about.

    Take a soft drinks bottle, the 300 m kind with an hourglass shape. Fill it half full, stand it in your freezer and leave upright until frozen. Then turn it upside down so the ice is in the top of the hourglass.

    Leave it like that as a silent watchman. If you ever see the ice in the bottom section, you know your freezer has thawed and re-frozen. Which might indicate a power outage or a dodgy freezer. HTH.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • westcoastscot
    • By westcoastscot 20th Oct 16, 8:23 AM
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    westcoastscot
    clever idea if you're away from home for any length of time GQ, thanks. We had a two-hour power cut yesterday evening - that'll be the start of winter then! We sat and chatted by the stove, with the kelly kettle boiling away on it's side in it, and candles everywhere :-) very cosy!
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 20th Oct 16, 8:47 AM
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    mardatha
    It would def be handy yes GQ. I really regret the impulse buy of my big American f/f. It was half price because of a long scratch on the side, which in my kitchen is hidden by the wall... so I got it. Never again! It loses cold really fast in power cuts and I don't trust it for meat. Only prob we have is that the HA gave us new double glazed PVC doors now that are much narrower than the previous ones and we canny get the bloody thing out! The RV is going to have to atack it and dismember it to get it out of the damn kitchen. I wish like hell I'd got a more economical one to run, that stays cold.
    • jk0
    • By jk0 20th Oct 16, 9:00 AM
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    jk0
    I think dismembering a fridge freezer would be pretty fatal, wouldn't it?
    Maybe leave it for the next occupant.

    I have a BTL flat with a large armchair I inherited from previous owner 6 years ago. I can't get it out of the lounge door! It will have to be cut up when it gets too scruffy.
    • ivyleaf
    • By ivyleaf 20th Oct 16, 10:01 AM
    • 3,937 Posts
    • 41,750 Thanks
    ivyleaf
    I think dismembering a fridge freezer would be pretty fatal, wouldn't it?
    Maybe leave it for the next occupant.

    I have a BTL flat with a large armchair I inherited from previous owner 6 years ago. I can't get it out of the lounge door! It will have to be cut up when it gets too scruffy.
    Originally posted by jk0
    Our first home in Germany when OH was in the army had a big old sofa in the living room, bought secondhand by the previous occupant. It was a real eyesore, but boy, was it comfortable! You'd think "I'll just sit here for a few minutes" and then you'd wake up two hours later
    • daz378
    • By daz378 20th Oct 16, 10:51 PM
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    daz378
    Mar...sorry to hear of your painful condition hope things improve.....just watched a docudrama called blackout uk no power for a week.... on the 3rd day a prepper lights up a barba Q in his garden and wonders why he suddenly gets a crowd investigating ... op sec...... someone said Russia putting a base in Cuba would the USA stand for that? i doubt it
    also just watched a fly on the wall documentary on Barking council housing dept all the people being knocked back ... made me appreciate my tiny council flat.......take care
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 21st Oct 16, 6:01 AM
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    GreyQueen
    I've watched that documentary before, daz, and thought that the BBQ incident was a classic example of what not to do. It would be better to eat cold tinned food than have to odour of cooking waft around when others are going hungry. That character and his family had a home invasion and were robbed of their food preps, if memory serves. Which then caused him to go our foraging in a looted shop in the blackout, where he ended up fighting with and (probably) killing someone.

    Lesson one. don't advertise. Lesson two; have your food preps in several places, with some findable and the others not so easily found, in case your home is looted.

    The Bosnian blogger Serco wrote about how rich homes, even ones very well protected by walls and gates etc, were no match for looters and were indeed the first ones targetted in the crisis. And that people who were prepared were targetted by their neighbours who stole their preps and also turned on them because they hadn't warned them of what was coming, and thus were culpable in their neighbours' sufferings when SHTF.

    Illogical, but people often are.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

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