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    • ivyleaf
    • By ivyleaf 13th Oct 16, 8:47 AM
    • 3,929 Posts
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    ivyleaf
    Thanks for the link to the mayo recipe, maryb
    • maryb
    • By maryb 13th Oct 16, 10:33 AM
    • 3,010 Posts
    • 35,191 Thanks
    maryb
    My pleasure. I use light olive oil from Liddle but ordinary veg oil is fine.

    However extra virgin olive oil is too strong a flavour.

    I don't know how long it keeps compared to shop bought, but it has always looked and tasted fineafter several days. I imagine emulsifying the egg in oil is a good preservative. That's my only reservation. Mind you, they say to use up the commercial stuff pretty quickly once it's open and I blithely ignore that
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 13th Oct 16, 12:05 PM
    • 5,947 Posts
    • 14,930 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    I will be keeping aspects of this from the offspring as they have a regrettable enthusiasm for pot noodle. Still, if I can nudge them into figuring their own from Real Noodles, win!
    I have passed on the potential horror to the Marmite fans - not only do I foresee a crazed rush to Waitrose, Sainsburys, Asda etc, from this window I can watch the addicts head over to Waitrose for a stash & stagger back!

    However, I need to review my supplies & reload before the currency malarkey gets passed along.
    • greenbee
    • By greenbee 13th Oct 16, 12:33 PM
    • 11,538 Posts
    • 208,233 Thanks
    greenbee
    I'm with Thriftwizard. Stay out of the supermarkets. Use real shops, farm shops and farmers markets. Buy as close to the producer as you can.
    • THIRZAH
    • By THIRZAH 13th Oct 16, 5:09 PM
    • 1,242 Posts
    • 5,592 Thanks
    THIRZAH
    Plenty of Marmite and Hellmans in our branch of Tesco today and no sign of panic buying. I do like Hellmans but a pot lasts us about three months and we have an unopened one in the cupboard
    • Si Clist
    • By Si Clist 13th Oct 16, 6:02 PM
    • 282 Posts
    • 2,036 Thanks
    Si Clist
    Stay out of the supermarkets. Use real shops, farm shops and farmers markets. Buy as close to the producer as you can.
    Originally posted by greenbee
    Oh believe me we'd love to! But where food's concerned, there are no longer any real shops in town. The nearest farm shop is 4 miles away, not on a bus route, and hard work on a bike because of the hills. And what passes for the town's farmers' market is a very sad joke, consisting of at best six stalls, all of which sell bought-in produce (i.e. they don't produce what they sell).

    As to buying as close to the producer as possible, we tried that with organic spelt grain a couple of years ago. The farm 4 miles away which grew it and packed it in 20kg bags wouldn't sell us one, so we're still getting it delivered by courier from 330 miles away.

    In practice, the best we can do to meet your high ideals is to grow as much of what we eat as possible.
    A positive attitude might not solve all your problems, but it'll annoy enough people to make the effort worthwhile
    • greenbee
    • By greenbee 13th Oct 16, 6:19 PM
    • 11,538 Posts
    • 208,233 Thanks
    greenbee
    I did say 'as close to the producer as you can'. It's not always easy. I find it harder where I live now than previously. ANd when I'm away for work it's impossible
    • singlestep
    • By singlestep 13th Oct 16, 7:17 PM
    • 188 Posts
    • 2,026 Thanks
    singlestep
    But they cost peanuts - by work standards - less than £50! That's petty cash to an employer. It's so low it's petty cash to many of us personally! Mean or what - ie your employer!

    As for the thieving work colleague - I'd be sending him an email (copy to the person in charge). It would be phrased in polite terms - but making it very plain he was helping himself to MY property. Basically - if I had to send him a second one (copy to manager) then I would have just "landed him in it" for being a little thief.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    List of things I have bought since August: pens and pencils (not for own use), projector remote, coloured paper, glue, paper clips, mouse mat, laser pointer, stapler, wall stapler, staple remover. The last three had also gone missing from my drawer when I wasn't there. There's more but then I might be really obvious to anyone who knows me IRL. Probably most of you can guess what I do for a living anyway! If I didn't buy them, I wouldn't get them but I have limited myself to £200 a year.

    As for the light-fingered colleague, I admit I've been passive-aggressive e.g. building-wide e-mail asking if anybody picked up my stuff 'accidentally' lifted or borrowed my things. I have another less senior colleague and some others who have been only too happy to tell me what's going on. He's nice enough but I ever catch him out, he'll be reminded he earns £x more than me to buy himself stuff!
    Last edited by singlestep; 13-10-2016 at 9:31 PM.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 13th Oct 16, 7:44 PM
    • 10,901 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Before retirement I had an office job and I can certainly recall there were times (going back quite some years too) in that job where pressure was put on to buy our own office supplies. That was the Civil Service too - not some tiny little private firm!!!!

    I had to be "firm" on more than one occasion as to what I needed to be able to actually manage to do the job (yep...tiny cheap little things at that...) and I dug my heels in and refused to have lower salary than had been agreed (which is what it would have been if I had paid for their office supplies for them). It was made very plain that "If I haven't got it - then I can't use it - and how can I do my job without it?" and they soon realised that every time I needed a new biro/etc/etc I would ask for it and keep asking for it and there would come a point when I literally wouldnt have what I needed to do my job and it wouldnt be done...

    I knew some of my colleagues were giving way to that pressure and buying their own from their own money - but I never paid for a single item of work stuff for my employer. I sometimes had to be quite a persistent "asker" for things I needed though...

    When it comes to things being stolen from your desk drawers - can you ask your line manager/Personnel/whoever else for a lock for those drawers? Again - I had to be a persistent "asker" to ensure I always had a couple of lockable drawers and they came to realise "the buck would stop with them" if anything of mine got stolen.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 13-10-2016 at 7:47 PM.
    The unexamined life is not worth living.
    • singlestep
    • By singlestep 13th Oct 16, 9:40 PM
    • 188 Posts
    • 2,026 Thanks
    singlestep
    I'm quite reconciled to it. If there's no money for it, it can't be bought If I didn't do it my working life would be impossible. My department has about the same annual budget as the department I started my professional life at. Current department has been merged with a much bigger one and is at a much bigger place

    I've asked about the lock and the building proprietors say no.

    ---

    We were having a chat with newish colleagues about bad weather preps - alternative routes home, keeping in touch when travelling in bad weather, essentials to keep in school/in the car boot. We are in an urban area but have been known to get stranded overnight.

    I have the dehydrated meal replacement, sachets of hot drinks, a couple of days of medicine, leisurewear I could sleep in and a change of undergarments, small towel, toothbrush and various miniatures of cleanser, shower gel, toothpaste and deodorant (which I have anyway for unexpected nights away). During late autumn til about Easter it lives in a filing cabinet drawer usually blocked by something else. I didn't get around to telling the colleagues this - usually people find it very strange.
    • vanoonoo
    • By vanoonoo 13th Oct 16, 11:21 PM
    • 1,863 Posts
    • 7,742 Thanks
    vanoonoo
    Hello *blinks*
    Blah
    • greenbee
    • By greenbee 13th Oct 16, 11:32 PM
    • 11,538 Posts
    • 208,233 Thanks
    greenbee
    *faints*
    • vanoonoo
    • By vanoonoo 13th Oct 16, 11:40 PM
    • 1,863 Posts
    • 7,742 Thanks
    vanoonoo
    I've bought a pressure cooker. Thought I should let you all know
    Blah
    • maryb
    • By maryb 14th Oct 16, 7:10 AM
    • 3,010 Posts
    • 35,191 Thanks
    maryb
    I use my pressure cooker more than any of my other gadgets. But the timings in the booklet for any veggies are usually way too long and that put me off using it for everyday cooking for a long time. For potatoes I now bring it to pressure and then depressurise it quickly if I am roasting them. If I want them cooked, I depressurise it slowly.

    I just love the way stewing steak cooks to melting flavoursome tenderness in 20 minutes. I never got on with slow cookers for casseroles, I always found the meat tasted rank in a really odd way and I never managed to work out what I was doing wrong.

    I've just done my Christmas pudding in the pressure cooker. It turns out beautifully every time.

    Perfect for gammon joints, 8 minutes per lb then in the oven for 20 minutes and the stock is lovely for soups.

    Every chicken carcass gets chucked in with an onion, a bunch of thyme and some garlic, 45 minutes and you get stock you could eat by itself, it's so good

    Lemon curd is amazing. You just beat the eggs, sugar and lemon juice together in a bowl that fits in the cooker, dot the butter over the top, cover with foil and do it in the pressure cooker for 15 minutes and leave to depressurise slowly, then just stir. It never curdles.

    Can you tell I'm a fan of pressure cookers?
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • richj
    • By richj 14th Oct 16, 7:24 AM
    • 242 Posts
    • 332 Thanks
    richj
    I use my pressure cooker more than any of my other gadgets. But the timings in the booklet for any veggies are usually way too long and that put me off using it for everyday cooking for a long time. For potatoes I now bring it to pressure and then depressurise it quickly if I am roasting them. If I want them cooked, I depressurise it slowly.

    I just love the way stewing steak cooks to melting flavoursome tenderness in 20 minutes. I never got on with slow cookers for casseroles, I always found the meat tasted rank in a really odd way and I never managed to work out what I was doing wrong.

    I've just done my Christmas pudding in the pressure cooker. It turns out beautifully every time.

    Perfect for gammon joints, 8 minutes per lb then in the oven for 20 minutes and the stock is lovely for soups.

    Every chicken carcass gets chucked in with an onion, a bunch of thyme and some garlic, 45 minutes and you get stock you could eat by itself, it's so good

    Lemon curd is amazing. You just beat the eggs, sugar and lemon juice together in a bowl that fits in the cooker, dot the butter over the top, cover with foil and do it in the pressure cooker for 15 minutes and leave to depressurise slowly, then just stir. It never curdles.

    Can you tell I'm a fan of pressure cookers?
    Originally posted by maryb
    Hi Mary,
    do you recommend any pressure cooker books? we've just taken th plunge for similar reasons to you, never really got on wit hthe slow cooker.
    cheers
    Rich
    • maryb
    • By maryb 14th Oct 16, 7:58 AM
    • 3,010 Posts
    • 35,191 Thanks
    maryb
    Sorry Rich, I'm still using the booklet that came with my original Prestige Hi-dome nearly 40 years ago (though I now have a lovely sleek Kuhn Rikon, Swiss made).

    I think there are some very good websites with pressure cooker recipes though they tend to be American so use cup measures, or if you can find it, one of those little Right Way paperbacks has some good basics

    I've seen quite a few books in the cookery section of Waterstones but haven't really delved into them

    Sorry I can't be more help
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • culpepper
    • By culpepper 14th Oct 16, 8:40 AM
    • 3,713 Posts
    • 6,053 Thanks
    culpepper
    Regarding the items being stolen at work..
    I had my scalpel stolen so often that I got one of those little rotary tools and engraved my name into the scalpel handle and anything else that I could engrave with it, I used to paint little designs on everything that could not just be wiped clean.
    For things like staplers etc..maybe buying one in lurid pink and / or customising with paint, knife & glue gun would put the culprit off.
    The more people that 'admire the artwork' the more likely that it remains unsnaffled.
    I remember a colleague having his sharp scissors stolen and him making do for about 6 weeks before they finally 'turned up'. He always pointed out afterwards that they weren't the same pair ,I think one of the managers bought the new pair because cutting everything with a craft knife was affecting the resulting work
    • ivyleaf
    • By ivyleaf 14th Oct 16, 9:55 AM
    • 3,929 Posts
    • 41,673 Thanks
    ivyleaf
    Great to "see" you vanoonoo !

    Thanks for starting off the original thread!
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 14th Oct 16, 10:14 AM
    • 13,297 Posts
    • 122,722 Thanks
    mardatha
    Waves to Vanoonoo
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 14th Oct 16, 1:14 PM
    • 10,901 Posts
    • 30,664 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Regarding the items being stolen at work..
    I had my scalpel stolen so often that I got one of those little rotary tools and engraved my name into the scalpel handle and anything else that I could engrave with it, I used to paint little designs on everything that could not just be wiped clean.
    For things like staplers etc..maybe buying one in lurid pink and / or customising with paint, knife & glue gun would put the culprit off.
    The more people that 'admire the artwork' the more likely that it remains unsnaffled.
    I remember a colleague having his sharp scissors stolen and him making do for about 6 weeks before they finally 'turned up'. He always pointed out afterwards that they weren't the same pair ,I think one of the managers bought the new pair because cutting everything with a craft knife was affecting the resulting work
    Originally posted by culpepper
    Certainly one way to deal with this.

    All my work property was owned by the employer (because I refused to buy anything from own money) and it used to get borrowed sometimes without asking me. When I got fed-up with having to ask (yet again) for some item I knew I already had I then started "personalising" it and could then readily spot it on whichever desk it had "moved" to and would just pick it up and take it back again.
    The unexamined life is not worth living.
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