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    • thriftwizard
    • By thriftwizard 21st Sep 16, 8:16 AM
    • 2,086 Posts
    • 26,023 Thanks
    thriftwizard
    Thanks, everyone, but news of her impending release has raised a prepping issue - if they send her home today, there's no food in her fridge! I took it all out at the end of last week, when we were being told it was going to be a long haul.

    That said, if I think about it, there should still be some eggs, and a tin of beans in her storecupboard. I'll need to ring the managers & check that they haven't reassigned her care slots; we're still paying for them, so they shouldn't have, but I know how desperate for time they are... No way will she be able to make her own supper yet!
    Angie

    GC Sept 16 - £506.83/£520
    GC Oct 16 - £500 - to feed 6 adults, 4 cats, 2 cockatiels and 12 chickens

    Money's just a substitute for time & talent...
    • ivyleaf
    • By ivyleaf 21st Sep 16, 9:08 AM
    • 3,715 Posts
    • 39,444 Thanks
    ivyleaf
    That's great news thriftwizard

    (That your mother is able to use her legs again, I mean, not that she won't be able to make her own supper yet )
    • thriftwizard
    • By thriftwizard 21st Sep 16, 5:34 PM
    • 2,086 Posts
    • 26,023 Thanks
    thriftwizard
    Panic over, she's coming home tomorrow. I should be able to carve a few minutes out of the day to buy in some necessities!
    Angie

    GC Sept 16 - £506.83/£520
    GC Oct 16 - £500 - to feed 6 adults, 4 cats, 2 cockatiels and 12 chickens

    Money's just a substitute for time & talent...
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 21st Sep 16, 5:40 PM
    • 13,065 Posts
    • 120,368 Thanks
    mardatha
    That's nice to hear xx
    Last edited by mardatha; 21-09-2016 at 7:53 PM.
    • daz378
    • By daz378 21st Sep 16, 7:34 PM
    • 503 Posts
    • 5,840 Thanks
    daz378
    Thriftwizard good to hear your family situation getting better. ive been sorting through 2nd bedroom 7 FB pies to eat this year.... took some early 2016 tins to flat reception about a carrier bag full on way to shopping ...upon my return they were gone...good to see someone could use them...was emptying storage containers for newer tins....dont want all my tins on kitchen shelves. take care
    • maryb
    • By maryb 22nd Sep 16, 8:39 AM
    • 2,925 Posts
    • 34,127 Thanks
    maryb
    Interesting article in the Torygraph from Ambrose Evans Pritchard
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/09/21/un-fears-third-leg-of-the-global-financial-crisis-with-epic-debt/

    The headline looks like pure doomer porn. But it's actually a bit more interesting than that. I wonder if we could manage a turnaround in thinking to a more productive economy that - whisper it- resulted in decent jobs for the majority not just the elite
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 22nd Sep 16, 8:52 AM
    • 10,033 Posts
    • 191,855 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    I've just been reading that myself, maryb. Got it open on another tab as we speak, in fact.

    The Torygraph isn't a renowned outpost of tinhattery and this is a respectable journalist.

    This exerpt:
    It allegedly "works" for emerging nations, and this is cited as the paramount moral justification even if free flows of capital have regrettably allowed multinationals to fatten on 'labour arbitrage' and play off western wages at against low-pay hubs abroad.
    But what UNCTAD shows is that globalisation has not in fact worked for these countries, bar a few exceptions. One starts to suspect that it works for nobody except the owners of capital and their close allies.

    Some of us have been convinced of this for many years already.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • westcoastscot
    • By westcoastscot 22nd Sep 16, 8:55 AM
    • 1,146 Posts
    • 14,198 Thanks
    westcoastscot
    Interesting article Maryb thank you. I don't see how we can avoid another/a continuation of the latest recession/depression. I know the powers that be, and lots of people on the street, are congratulating themselves that the sky didn't fall after the brexit vote, but has no-body realised that nothing has actually happened yet in that regard? I just don't see how we can come out of the brexit vote unscathed - we're so far from being an autonomous country now that we just cannot exist in a vacuum, and we haven't really recovered from events of recent years. Certainly here in Argyll the worst is yet to come, going by the cuts that are coming our way the next couple of years.
    • maryb
    • By maryb 22nd Sep 16, 8:58 AM
    • 2,925 Posts
    • 34,127 Thanks
    maryb
    suggestions are that Philip Hammond is prepared to spend on productive investment. But what's to say it won't end up being owned by foreign investors who just drain the profits?

    Whereas the French were completely unembarassed by claiming that Danone was an industry of strategic national importance and should not therefore be allowed to be taken over by foreign investors
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 22nd Sep 16, 9:06 AM
    • 10,033 Posts
    • 191,855 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    The taking over of UK utilities and other key businesses has been disquieting me for decades now. To me, having the key controls over your power, and any number of other things, in the hands of foriegn entitites, is nothing short of madness.

    Those entities may be part of neutral or allied nation-states at the time of the takeover, but who knows how long that state of affairs may pertain?

    If someone else has control of the resources your nation needs to survive, they have you by the proverbial short and curlies.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • ivyleaf
    • By ivyleaf 22nd Sep 16, 2:16 PM
    • 3,715 Posts
    • 39,444 Thanks
    ivyleaf
    I did read today that TTIP looks close to collapsing. Should I be pleased, or not? I haven't a clue - I'd sort of gathered that TTIP was a Bad Thing, but the piece said that it would be much more difficult for the UK to secure trade deals after Brexit without it.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 22nd Sep 16, 2:45 PM
    • 10,033 Posts
    • 191,855 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    I did read today that TTIP looks close to collapsing. Should I be pleased, or not? I haven't a clue - I'd sort of gathered that TTIP was a Bad Thing, but the piece said that it would be much more difficult for the UK to secure trade deals after Brexit without it.
    Originally posted by ivyleaf
    If TTIP collapses, it will be a good thing. As regarding trade deals, they can be negotiated and will be negotiated.

    We're in the top half-dozen richest countries in the world. People will want to do business with us. They will need to do business with us. Can you imagine Frau Merkel or her successor meeting with the big cheeses of the German car industry and told that her prospective tariffs against trade into the UK cannot and will not be allowed to stand, their bottom line is at stake? And tens of thousands of her countrymens' employments?

    Repeat indefinately for all businesses in all countries. Yes, there will be some very public political stropping, blustering and toys-from-pram moments but, in the end, we have traded internationally for millennia and will continue to do so.

    Have you been to the Hook of Holland and disembarked from a ferry and driven through an ocean of edge-to-edge greenhouses where flowers and veggies destined for the UK market are being grown? Or been in the Sierra Nevada of southern Spain, and looked down at the valleys full of plastic greenhouses near the coast? Lots of that produce in being sent here. Those growers and their investors aren't going to disappear any time soon, nor are the greengrocery needs of the UK.

    We could just say sod yer citrus and we'll eat our own apples and pears and be done with it, but we were importing oranges when Elizabeth I was on the throne. I expect there was some kind of duty paid on them at the ports, but they got here just the same.

    The trade negotiators will just have to pull their finger out and hustle for some tasty deals.

    Re TTIP, anything the US proposes by way of international trade tends to be good for their biggest businesses and very bad for everyone else; their small businesses and businesses of all calibers in what is amusingly called trading partners.

    I shall now head allotmentwards, to ready my soil for the coming year and to admire my pumpkins. Talk is cheap, but gardening is eternal.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 22nd Sep 16, 4:07 PM
    • 5,508 Posts
    • 13,603 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    Talk is cheap, but gardening is eternal.
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    To my irritation, so appear to be slugs. I was going to invest in nematodes via t'internet (and blinking at the name as it sounds like the sort of race Dr.Who would vanquish) but having read this article and blinked still further, I may print it out that the Gardener's Boy can read & heed. I foresee another ten-pence bounty per critter (he earned the nickname SnailFarmer a couple of years back) but a steady supply of AntiSlug concoction may be worth it.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 22nd Sep 16, 5:02 PM
    • 10,033 Posts
    • 191,855 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    I don't know if you were reading back then, but some old stagers from MSE may recall the Great Slug War of 2013; GQ vs the Allotment Gastropod Nation.

    Armed only with an attitude problem, and various items made of Cold Steel *, I waged a solitary war on slugs with a few side sorties against snails. I was killing about a hundred a day, the blasted things were everywhere, it was ridiculous. Like a low-level version of a proverbial plague of Eqypt.

    Bearing in mind those big slugs can live up to 6 years, and that this far south, most of them will survive the winter, I had to do something. I killed them on sight, they weren't hard to find, the brazen critters were everywhere. I was genuinely fearful I'd have no veg at all in 2014 if they lived to breed.

    In 2014, I found 6 slugs (killed on sight). 2015 and 2016 ditto. Other people on the site are having lot of trouble still.

    I have no idea if a gastropod species has a race memory, and if the ones local to me have been passing warnings down the generations, but they do seem to stay out of my plot and off my veggies and fruits.

    * grass shears, hand trowel and spade.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • DawnW
    • By DawnW 22nd Sep 16, 5:49 PM
    • 3,994 Posts
    • 29,624 Thanks
    DawnW
    To my irritation, so appear to be slugs. I was going to invest in nematodes via t'internet (and blinking at the name as it sounds like the sort of race Dr.Who would vanquish) but having read this article and blinked still further, I may print it out that the Gardener's Boy can read & heed. I foresee another ten-pence bounty per critter (he earned the nickname SnailFarmer a couple of years back) but a steady supply of AntiSlug concoction may be worth it.
    Originally posted by DigForVictory
    I don't know if you were reading back then, but some old stagers from MSE may recall the Great Slug War of 2013; GQ vs the Allotment Gastropod Nation.

    Armed only with an attitude problem, and various items made of Cold Steel *, I waged a solitary war on slugs with a few side sorties against snails. I was killing about a hundred a day, the blasted things were everywhere, it was ridiculous. Like a low-level version of a proverbial plague of Eqypt.

    Bearing in mind those big slugs can live up to 6 years, and that this far south, most of them will survive the winter, I had to do something. I killed them on sight, they weren't hard to find, the brazen critters were everywhere. I was genuinely fearful I'd have no veg at all in 2014 if they lived to breed.

    In 2014, I found 6 slugs (killed on sight). 2015 and 2016 ditto. Other people on the site are having lot of trouble still.

    I have no idea if a gastropod species has a race memory, and if the ones local to me have been passing warnings down the generations, but they do seem to stay out of my plot and off my veggies and fruits.

    * grass shears, hand trowel and spade.
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    I have a small terraced house with a bit-more-than-a-courtyard garden, beloved of slugs, snails and many other pests

    I did try the internet nematodes one year, and in all fairness, there WERE far fewer slugs that summer Haven't bothered since, though I have adopted GQ's strategy Might use them again at some point, not ruling it out - though the cold steel option is cheaper! Meanwhile I am about to apply a nematode treatment for vine weevils, the curse of the container gardener These nasty little beggars eat the roots of plants overwinter given the chance. The nematodes stop them in their tracks, applied autumn and / or spring.

    • Si Clist
    • By Si Clist 22nd Sep 16, 6:05 PM
    • 254 Posts
    • 1,800 Thanks
    Si Clist
    ...I shall now head allotmentwards, to ready my soil for the coming year and to admire my pumpkins.
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    While you're there, tell 'em it's only 38 more days now before The Great Pumpkin appears

    ETA - Just in case somebody out there hasn't yet rumbled this, one way to attract slugs to wherever it's most convenient for you to jump on them is to leave the corpses around for others to feed on.
    Last edited by Si Clist; 22-09-2016 at 6:13 PM.
    A positive attitude might not solve all your problems, but it'll annoy enough people to make the effort worthwhile
    • milasavesmoney
    • By milasavesmoney 23rd Sep 16, 12:25 AM
    • 1,439 Posts
    • 10,998 Thanks
    milasavesmoney
    Slug cannibalism! I've gotten quite the education reading this thread over the last year.
    Sept $424.41/$500 ~~ 3/6 EF #46 $11,273/$15,000 ~~ Xmas/Bday 2016 $3002/$6500 ~~ WL 2016 ~15 lb
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 23rd Sep 16, 3:56 AM
    • 2,087 Posts
    • 26,916 Thanks
    monnagran
    I had great success with beer traps.
    Having sunk the margarine cartons into the soil I hastened to T*sc*s to purchase the fatal liquid.
    Being a teetotal family, (well, me anyway) I surveyed the massed ranks of cans and bottles with some dismay.
    The spotty youth I collared to quiz, did his best to help by showing me what was what. I was still bemused but assured him that I wanted something as cheap as possible.
    Was it for a barbecue, he asked.
    No, I explained, it was for the slugs.

    His face was a picture.

    I bet he is still dining out on the story of the mad old bat who threw parties for slugs.

    x
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
    • culpepper
    • By culpepper 23rd Sep 16, 9:50 AM
    • 3,656 Posts
    • 5,737 Thanks
    culpepper
    I had great success with beer traps.
    Having sunk the margarine cartons into the soil I hastened to T*sc*s to purchase the fatal liquid.
    Being a teetotal family, (well, me anyway) I surveyed the massed ranks of cans and bottles with some dismay.
    I wanted something as cheap as possible.
    x
    Originally posted by monnagran
    I think you can just use yeasty water.
    They definitely like ginger beer.
    • Si Clist
    • By Si Clist 23rd Sep 16, 1:07 PM
    • 254 Posts
    • 1,800 Thanks
    Si Clist
    I think you can just use yeasty water.
    They definitely like ginger beer.
    Originally posted by culpepper
    But according to a bloke on the allotments, they're not keen on Morrison's cheap cider.

    We tried all sorts of tactics in our veg garden from nematodes to beer traps, and in the end solved the problem by going out with a torch on a rainy night and seeing where they were coming from.

    In our case, most of them were based under the hedge that runs down one side of it, and I soon established that the optimum time to catch them crossing the path was just after it got dark. Having worked out peak time, I soon found that the quickest and easiest way to dispatch the things was the rapid application of the heel of my welly to the back 1/3 of 'em while they were still on the path. If done just right, that shot their insides clear across the path and back into the hedge, leaving a minimal amount of squashed slug on the path for me to skate on.

    Best tally for one session was 90+ slugs and 16 snails
    A positive attitude might not solve all your problems, but it'll annoy enough people to make the effort worthwhile
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