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    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 9th Oct 17, 5:40 PM
    • 14,038 Posts
    • 130,779 Thanks
    mardatha
    I've worked in an infectious diseases ward and seen Weils Disease in sewage workers. Pretty horrendous what it does to men. And that's all I'm saying lol.
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 9th Oct 17, 6:21 PM
    • 9,714 Posts
    • 51,035 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    I have microwave rice, which can be heated in a pan over a camp fire. Instant mash would need water added
    Originally posted by missusP
    You'll need some water for the microwave rice as well.
    My job is Top Secret. Even I don't know what I'm doing.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - £1161
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 9th Oct 17, 6:33 PM
    • 9,714 Posts
    • 51,035 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    I agree, if I had to evacuate it is still the best option and is very easy to carry in its case.
    Originally posted by missusP
    These are great for evacuation use.



    Super light (only a few ounces) and compact.

    Gas cartridges come in sizes 100g, 250g and 500g, and available all over the place.
    My job is Top Secret. Even I don't know what I'm doing.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - £1161
    • Witless
    • By Witless 9th Oct 17, 8:37 PM
    • 534 Posts
    • 2,068 Thanks
    Witless

    So, what kind of gloves to you stock in your life for varous tasks? Have you got supplies of any kind put by, and for what purpose, and are they still usable (i.e. plastic gloves have possibly rotted in storage)?
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    I keep a couple of pairs of these handy (in the car, the main BOB and the bulk emergency crate in the shed)

    http://www.thesafetysupplycompany.co.uk/p/9164789/supreme-ttf---value-cut-5-safety-gloves---conforms-to-en388-4543---ht-rtf-501.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIgJ3DuKPk1gIVK7HtCh0XNAG REAQYAiABEgLqdvD_BwE

    (not this brand, but this type. My PetrolHeadMate gets me them, they'reunbranded but the same thing and don't impact on dexterity)
    • Nargleblast
    • By Nargleblast 9th Oct 17, 10:18 PM
    • 9,361 Posts
    • 55,002 Thanks
    Nargleblast
    Greyqueen - referring to your points about catching diseases. I read some time ago about a keen gardener/allotmenteer who saved up dead leaves in black plastic sacks to make leaf mould for the garden. He opened up the sacks after several weeks and became very sick with a fungal pneumonia caused by inhaling aspergillus spores from the leaf mould. So, watch it, all you allotmenteers, when handling dead vegetation. (You listening there, Fuddle?)
    Debt free date.....3 August 2015
    Now building up a Doomsday Cash Stash
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 10th Oct 17, 6:59 AM
    • 11,280 Posts
    • 217,206 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Greyqueen - referring to your points about catching diseases. I read some time ago about a keen gardener/allotmenteer who saved up dead leaves in black plastic sacks to make leaf mould for the garden. He opened up the sacks after several weeks and became very sick with a fungal pneumonia caused by inhaling aspergillus spores from the leaf mould. So, watch it, all you allotmenteers, when handling dead vegetation. (You listening there, Fuddle?)
    Originally posted by Nargleblast
    I've never forgotten that, Nargleblast.

    I don't do leaf composting. I have nowhere like a garden to collect leaves from and wouldn't want to take them off the road for the probability of them being contaminated by fuel and tyre rubber residues. This is apparently a thing, not my being neurotic.

    Otherwise, I compost veggie scraps in a Dalek for a couple of years and dry out and burn non-compostable veggie matter.

    Thinking of going to the hardware store for some of those type of gloves, they look excellent. And, frankly, a lot of what is marketed as so-called gardening gloves are little better than useless. Such as flimsy cotton or knit ones with little dimples on them, all of which come unstitched on the finger seams/ wear through on the fingers in no time at all. They seem to be aimed at ladies who do nothing more demanding than snip a few flower stems.

    Whereas we allotmenteers are more like the shock troops of the gardening world. I have to bramble-wrangle frequently. I don't allow brambles on my lottie but they are on neighbouring plots and, as is their growth habit, are prepetually trying to climb into mine.

    I don't have a car, but a pair of such gloves would be a useful addition to a car kit, if I did have, for roadside adventuring of the tyre-changing nature, etc.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Witless
    • By Witless 10th Oct 17, 8:08 AM
    • 534 Posts
    • 2,068 Thanks
    Witless
    I don't have a car, but a pair of such gloves would be a useful addition to a car kit, if I did have, for roadside adventuring of the tyre-changing nature, etc.
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    They're even better than that - since I started carrying them I haven't need to change a wheel!


    (Just jinxed myself, haven't I?)
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 10th Oct 17, 12:48 PM
    • 27,861 Posts
    • 152,717 Thanks
    Karmacat
    Oh my. There's a lot of really important information on here! Thank you all.

    BB - there's a whole subplot about pet dogs that goes throughout the book, but I was just looking at my ecopy now of One Second After, and this is a quote from a meeting about 6 weeks after the event, its a proposal up for discussion:

    "Loose animals will be shot and given to the communal food supply.
    Owners must keep pets inside or leashed. If an owner decides to dispatch a pet on their own, they can keep it for their own food supply."


    Retired August 2016
    • S_Wales_Saver
    • By S_Wales_Saver 10th Oct 17, 1:19 PM
    • 233 Posts
    • 2,582 Thanks
    S_Wales_Saver
    Like GQ we’ve had a water related crisis this weekend! At about 4am Sunday morning the hot water tank in the airing cupboard sprang a leak. DD1 heard strange noises and found water dripping through the lounge ceiling. Cue call to plumber who drained the (very large) tank and disconnected it and the boiler.

    No heating or hot water Sunday but a promise to return first thing Monday morning. On Sunday morning dripping restarted It appears there was a large quantity of water still between the floor and ceiling. That was quickly drained, but during the night on Sunday a full sized piece of plasterboard collapsed onto the lounge floor.

    The plumber duly arrived on Monday morning to measure up the tank - it has to be made to order because of the size. I rang the insurance company only to be told that we should shut up the room and not use it until asbestos testing could be carried out . If the test is positive, the whole ceiling needs to come down, otherwise one half (of a 25ft room) has to be repaired.

    Plans were made with the damage inspector this morning for furniture to go into storage, ceiling to be repaired/replaced and replastered. Then there will need to be redecorating and a specialist cleaning firm for the carpet. The tank will be replaced on Thursday. Thank goodness for insurance, both house and contents insurance and home cover who have been wonderfully efficient, supplying a plumber within an hour at 4am on a Sunday morning. What an interesting week!!!
    Last edited by S_Wales_Saver; 10-10-2017 at 1:22 PM.
    Dor
    • ivyleaf
    • By ivyleaf 10th Oct 17, 6:32 PM
    • 4,864 Posts
    • 50,946 Thanks
    ivyleaf
    Oh S_Wales_Saver, what a stressful thing to happen Very impressed about the plumber though! I hope it will all be sorted soonest.
    • fuddle
    • By fuddle 10th Oct 17, 7:00 PM
    • 5,833 Posts
    • 88,402 Thanks
    fuddle
    I've worked in an infectious diseases ward and seen Weils Disease in sewage workers. Pretty horrendous what it does to men. And that's all I'm saying lol.
    Originally posted by mardatha
    Greyqueen - referring to your points about catching diseases. I read some time ago about a keen gardener/allotmenteer who saved up dead leaves in black plastic sacks to make leaf mould for the garden. He opened up the sacks after several weeks and became very sick with a fungal pneumonia caused by inhaling aspergillus spores from the leaf mould. So, watch it, all you allotmenteers, when handling dead vegetation. (You listening there, Fuddle?)
    Originally posted by Nargleblast
    I'm listening nargle. No leaf mould for me now so thank you. I was intending on collecting but that was before these last few weeks. I'm as careful as I can be on the plot because one lady contracted Weil's on the plots a couple of years ago. They tell me that they were unkempt back then and the council has since taken a firmer cleanliness/tidiness stance but a lot of things are playing in my mind about the plot right now. Leaf mould wasn't one of them so thank you. I always wear gardening gloves the quality will be improving and anti bacterial gel will be sought. I guess all I can do is keep my plot as clean as possible and remove dead vegetation.
    Good enough is good enough.

    BMI - Oct: 31.8 Nov:?
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 11th Oct 17, 11:14 AM
    • 27,861 Posts
    • 152,717 Thanks
    Karmacat
    I guess all I can do is keep my plot as clean as possible and remove dead vegetation.
    Originally posted by fuddle
    This is what I'm doing in my own garden. I clipped back all my hedges, after years of neglect during illness ... but I still haven't got rid of it all off the property. I'm workingon it now, but some of it smells of cat pee and I had a second rat infestation this year

    And believe me, I use gloves for everything in the garden - either big thick gardening gloves, or washing up gloves, if I'm doing something a bit delicate



    Save
    Retired August 2016
    • kittie
    • By kittie 11th Oct 17, 3:00 PM
    • 11,144 Posts
    • 62,179 Thanks
    kittie
    aspergillus
    This is what I am convinced, eventually killed my husband. He was very healthy and fit until he came in contact with this, in some rotten buildings that he had to survey. Got lung disease which eventually led to his heart failing due to the hard work of supplying oxygen

    Re gloves outside, I never but never do anything in the garden without good gloves, not even moving pots or handling any soil. Rats are all over at night
    • ivyleaf
    • By ivyleaf 11th Oct 17, 5:38 PM
    • 4,864 Posts
    • 50,946 Thanks
    ivyleaf
    I remember years ago a neighbour being a bit sniffy about my always wearing gloves for gardening. "I'm afraid I like to feel the soil on my fingers!" she commented. Hmm.
    • kittie
    • By kittie 12th Oct 17, 8:02 PM
    • 11,144 Posts
    • 62,179 Thanks
    kittie
    Just a quickie to say that I still get advance weather info, the forthcoming storm was forecast a month ago and is definitely coming to fruition. Could be hurricane to cyclone, the models are saying it will likely track first from s Ireland Cork first and it looks as though the west coast, sw England , Wales and w Scotland will be severely affected. Remember 30 years ago? It appears to be building up worse than that and will stretch the emergency services. Think severe wind, rain, floods. I already started to take precautions with ropes on the allotment and tomorrow will remove any potential flying objects from around the house. Candles and matches handy and batteries fully charged for portable lighting and radio. I think monday/tuesday and keep an eye on the pressure, watch as it drops and be prepared. 30 years ago, I was at work and people were called home as their windows had blown in. I had drawn all my curtains in case of flying glass
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 12th Oct 17, 9:01 PM
    • 11,280 Posts
    • 217,206 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Thanks for the warning, kittie, I will go up to the lottie tomorrow after w*rk and make some preps.

    The cold frame was mended last weekend, when two rotten end planks were levered out and replaced. It is very heavy but the only vulnerable point it the steel-framed window which forms its lid. I will have a think about what, if anything, I could do to mitigate any damage to that.

    One of my two water butts, which are very large food-grade barrels, is presently lying empty on its side behind the shed. I drained it down so's I could move it so I could access behind it to paint the shed. I was meaning to let the mud inside dry out before getting rid of it and re-filling.

    I shall do a fast version of that chore, re-instate the barrell, then bail water from the other barrell so they both end up half-full and thus pretty heavy and stable.

    I remember the storm of 1987 very well. It happened to be the only day that my Kid Bruv, at college in the midlands, came up to Scotland to see me when I was at uni. I had no phone, and he was MIA somewhere in several hundred miles of territory. I rang his college from a payphone and they could tell me when he'd left (early morning) but no one knew where the heck he was.

    He turned up just before midnight, having been travelling for something like 18 hours, originally by train but having to switch to and fro between trains and buses as lines/ roads were blocked all over the place with fallen trees and other debris. Poor kid was exhausted and I was so relieved I (almost) forgave him for having nicked my TT Races souvenir tee-shirt and have been guileless enough to come visit me wearing it (bless!).

    A think to remember about windows in stormy weather is that a window which is partially open, can allow wind in which can then blow out other windows or even rip a hole in the roof from inside. The physics of it are pretty astonishing. Soooo, prolly a good time for us fresh-air fiends to seal the place up tightly.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • maryb
    • By maryb 12th Oct 17, 9:12 PM
    • 3,399 Posts
    • 40,321 Thanks
    maryb
    I remember in the 87 storm, going up to bed just as it was getting going and the pressure had dislodged the loft hatch - lifted clean out just as if someone was going up there to get something. The windows were all closed but were Victorian sashes so let in a fair old draft. The floor under each window had a great pile of those tiny Robinia leaves which had forced their way in
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • kittie
    • By kittie 13th Oct 17, 7:32 AM
    • 11,144 Posts
    • 62,179 Thanks
    kittie
    getting very serious, intensified to a cat 2 over the sea but will lose a bit of energy over the cold water, looks as though a cat1 hurricane, dangerous to life. I have already used some rope on the lottie, will be getting more today and lashing my empty water butt down. Will also be lowering to the ground my very heavy cantilever parasol in the garden. Nothing much on the news but still uncertain wrt tracking but still looks like in my last post
    • Pooky
    • By Pooky 13th Oct 17, 7:42 AM
    • 6,713 Posts
    • 41,433 Thanks
    Pooky
    The local (to me) weather bloke has said our little corner of the country is likely to be uneffected by the storm and he's normally spot on, we have frequent power cuts anyway so always prepped for that and the garden is all ready for winter so nothing to blow about.

    The big storm of 30 years ago really ripped through this village, loads of roofs lost and structural damage. The perils of cliff top living. I was living about 3 miles away at the time and remember trying to walk to work, hanging on to a lamppost in the middle of the road and deciding I wasn't going any further....managed to get home and watched the fence panels fall like dominoes across the back gardens.
    "Start every day off with a smile and get it over with" - W. C. Field.
    • Floss
    • By Floss 13th Oct 17, 8:12 AM
    • 3,931 Posts
    • 31,747 Thanks
    Floss
    Apparently it's Hurricane Ophelia...
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