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    • kittie
    • By kittie 19th May 17, 4:27 PM
    • 10,771 Posts
    • 57,919 Thanks
    kittie
    I`m not doing any extra prepping either, I have enough of everything, except wood fuel pellets but I have endless candles, so that will do in a tiny room. I can ride a bike and I can spin, knit and make felt. I have filters that will clean dirty water and most of all I have a cosy house and can fit my family in if they need a roof

    It looks like impeachment could happen and that is going to shake foundations and cause a massive world upset. We don`t seem to have that many stable world leaders, more unstable leaders and crackpots with several having access to the nuclear button

    I think one of the best things to be doing is to work on getting rid of cc debt. As inflation is rising, so interest rates will rise and stretched homeowners won`t know whats hit them. I agree with MrsLW in that several of us were in the position when we were a breath away from financial disaster but being old school, we knew how to cope. 15% interest rates, it could well happen again. We didn`t use energy, we made do with whatever we could grow or forage, we knew how to make vegan food, we knew how to do without and we survived but it was very very hard
    • maryb
    • By maryb 19th May 17, 4:39 PM
    • 3,286 Posts
    • 38,829 Thanks
    maryb
    I remember weeping when interest rates went up after DH had lost his job. We held on, though as you say. I had a tiny blistery rash all over my hands for months and I completely lost my sense of taste, all pure stress.

    And we didn't even have any cc debt. Our mortgage was very affordable when we took it out on two salaries. But when we lost half our income and had childcare (which we had to keep so that DH could get another job) it was very different.
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 19th May 17, 5:32 PM
    • 10,668 Posts
    • 148,397 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    70 has already happened for He Who Knows and is going to happen to me in January next year and I've more oomph now than I've ever had in my life and so has he. We don't give age a passing thought but we DO just get on and do all the things that need doing as they occur it just takes a little longer than it did when we were 30. This morning we were given 3 trailer loads of oak logs which we unloaded onto the front lawn and He Who Knows got out the axe, the chop saw and the splitters and set to work, I was (still am) on carrying and wheelbarrow/stacking duty and we processed most of the smaller branches. Then he started splitting the cords of bigger wood which are in quarters to be sawn into half when we need them (also when we replace the chop saw which finally blew up today). We run the plots and use the crops and enjoy every minute of it. We walk other folks dogs and have a great life and stay active, it's good to be physically tired at the end of every day and sleep because of it. 70 should hold no fears, it's only 69 + 1 day! xxx.
    Go forward with the vision even if no one else can see it!

    No amount of regretting can change the past, and no amount of worrying can change the future!
    • maryb
    • By maryb 19th May 17, 5:52 PM
    • 3,286 Posts
    • 38,829 Thanks
    maryb
    Sadly, although I am pretty well healed from the crush fracture of my spine last year, it has left me with aches and pains, and with having quite bad osteoporosis chances are I may get frailer than I would like. Mind you, I tripped and fell quite heavily last week with no lasting damage so I'm not exactly falling apart just yet. Eating well and getting exercise is a form of prepping for me
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 19th May 17, 6:17 PM
    • 13,844 Posts
    • 128,307 Thanks
    mardatha
    I think, as an older prepper of 67, some things we can't prep for. Like a stroke or broken hip for example. Sometimes things happen to us that are not preppable-forable really, unless by our mindset of getting on with it and coping. Health is one thing that can go to hell fast, right out of the blue. So I'm sort of working on that, trying to make life easier for us and make sure each of us knows how to do everything.
    Currently re-reading All Quiet on the Home Front, a real eye-opener of life in Britain during WW1. How miners bairns starved and actually died of malnutrition, and how every single family was hit in some way by the war - and had to get by without any help at all. Some of it is hard reading - but great examples of self-help and prepper mentality. We don't know how lucky we are.
    • daz378
    • By daz378 19th May 17, 6:54 PM
    • 537 Posts
    • 6,217 Thanks
    daz378
    bought 3 led candles and some normal candles and a lantern ... but i consider my greatest prepp is not being in debt and not being tempted by the latest technological marvel....back in work monday
    • elona
    • By elona 19th May 17, 7:55 PM
    • 11,006 Posts
    • 57,469 Thanks
    elona
    At the moment my prepping seems to be spending money to make the house safe, secure and comfortable. Downstairs is more or less what I wanted, the staircase has been made safe and upstairs is being finished off with built in storage, nice curtains etc and a new wardrobe for the biggest bedroom has been ordered.

    Nothing has been done on credit and everything has been carefully thought out. If youngest and bf end up moving from Liverpool and need somewhere to stay while they find a flat etc then upstairs should be usable and even comfortable.

    I am going to start using up some preps and trying new recipes etc
    I have been able to take advantage of various sales so have not had to spend as much as I feared to get nice, good quality things.

    I want to get back to making my own bread (using a machine) and making sure I cook from scratch again. Have lots of candles, tealights, solar lights as well as a solar radio.

    Next goal has to be looking after my health and losing weight as well as walking a bit more and not getting breathless.
    "This site is addictive!"
    Wooligan 2 squares for smoky - 3 squares for HTA
    Preemie hats - 2.
    • Witless
    • By Witless 19th May 17, 8:18 PM
    • 491 Posts
    • 1,830 Thanks
    Witless
    I'm a mere whippersnapper - but am (painfully) aware of getting older.

    I mentioned before that one of my preps is 'future proofing' and am slowly working through the house: last project was the bathroom - larger shower (room for a plastic garden chair if it ever becomes necessary) and anti slip flooring - once the 25 year warranty has expired I'll not be too worried.

    Kitchen is ongoing - the electrician should be out by Monday afternoon: I wanted extra sockets so some are at waist height. There were two reasons for doing it now; cost - materials are getting more expensive (but labour costs coming down - black economy?) and time/age - the kitchen was functional as were the electrics but in 10 or 15 years in my 70s I'm not sure I'd be up to tracking walls with a kango (saving a lot on the costs* but paying for it now - time for a long bath and an early night.


    Apparently the average cost nationally of supply & fit of an additional double socket is £120 (though it's £75 -£100 locally): I've done the first fix -
    tracking/cutting, installed the conduit & plaster boxes and pulled the wires through. With that degree of prep the spark reckons about an hour to connect them so £40ish on the bill for the new consumer unit & inspection. I had a fair bit of kit left over from the last rewire in the 90s (the only difference is that old kit is better quality) but bought a few bits & pieces - change from £50. For the sake of a couple of days work (& a soreish back) a saving of over £600 isn't to be sneezed at. Took me 2 days so far with about 5 or 6 hours left to do - making good plasterwork & sanding down.

    I still have some kit left but think I won't bother upgrading my stock: it mightn't quite be time to hang up the gloves but I'm certainly considering deep cleaning & greasing the kango - I don't think I'll be doing much more of that type of slog.
    Last edited by Witless; 19-05-2017 at 8:27 PM. Reason: warrantY not warrant - probably only one of many typos
    • kittie
    • By kittie 20th May 17, 6:30 AM
    • 10,771 Posts
    • 57,919 Thanks
    kittie
    mar, I lent my book to my neighbour, who is 10 years older than me, the youngest of 11 from a farm in lincolnshire. He is loving it, says it brings back so many memories but at the same time is hard reading as in emotional. I will never get rid of that book. I am 69 and will also be 70 in january 2018 and I feel energetic and well but have learnt to pace myself better and to relax in the afternoons for a while, ok to have a short nap. I am still quite strong but only because I cycle and lift things, making sure not to twist or to kneel on hard floors, however my strength is going compared to 20 years ago, hence the pilates ring out on my sofa and the elastic at the bottom of the stairs, just a few stretches helps no end

    Getting old is going into the unknown, who knows what illnesses and events will strike, it only takes one episode to have that fall which breaks an important bone.

    Witless it is good to keep on top of improvements and maintenance, I had to give away the heavy tools but kept the lightweight ones, adding to the saws etc. I have a good selection of tools, including electric tools like sanders, drill, a safe saw etc. Yours is a good age to get all these jobs done. I have kept on top of maintenance, did a reachable lime render repair two years ago, excavated behind and repaired and future proofed a long wooden retaining wall, gave high wooden supports and balcony railings a good two coats of thick coloured oil based preservative. I can`t see me doing that job again, it meant me moving and tying a long ladder to the railings, was safe but took me two weeks full on. However, I did it properly and would now ask someone to come in and just give it a coat when needed. Prepping is also about having enough knowledge to be able to employ a tradesman, so that they know that we will not be ripped off because we know what we are doing.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 20th May 17, 7:02 AM
    • 12,880 Posts
    • 35,375 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Kittie - after what you said about pilates rings - I duly looked them up and one is en route to me as we speak. How do you use yours? (ie how often etc). Am now doing finishing touches as regards getting the work done on my house - so the idea is to put in a fitness routine of daily yoga and daily go for a walk and/or aerobic type exercise session now that I'll soon be able to focus more on My Life iyswim.

    I'm not a cyclist - but I'm also wondering whether I should buy myself an exercise bike. Do you have any recommendations on that?

    I'm conscious of needing to get the strength in both arms and legs back to normal and that prepping for me consists basically of "getting back to normal - and then staying that way".

    I read a lot of comments by people along the lines of them saying "when I get weaker/frailer/etc/etc" and that isn't an option I'm prepared to contemplate for me. Each to their own - but I wouldnt consider life worth living if I couldnt go out for a whole day doing what I please (including going for a reasonable length walk). I always feel sorry for people who have any level of being housebound and I'm very conscious that it's not feasible to live in a more rural location like this (even though I'm in a town) with a body that would only allow for going to "indoor events". It would be possible in my home city - because there are so many indoor event things going on. Here - it would be much more difficult - as there are many fewer "indoor events" and I cant go to some of them (as they're in another language - well I tried one and felt very out of it because of not understanding it). So my body has to remain up to the "go out for whole day and having reasonable length walk" standard basically. Not to mention fit enough to lug a heavy suitcase around every time I go back for home visits - which I shall be doing more often (now that money isnt quite such a problem as it was).
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 20-05-2017 at 7:05 AM.
    ploughing my own furrow...the rain begins with a single drop...

    #I'mWithNoel
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 20th May 17, 7:17 AM
    • 11,078 Posts
    • 213,320 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Morning all.

    One thing that I have definately observed with every person I know as they age is that decline in physical strength, mobility and overall health isn't ever a smoothly descending curve.

    Vitality goes down in sharp drops, with an injury or an illness being the trigger for a sudden decline in overall health and functionality. Oftentimes, the re-set is at a much lower level.

    This is why it's an excellent idea to do future-proofing, decluttering and even downsizing before you 'have to' as, by the time that situation comes around, you may not be in a position to do the work unaided or even at all.

    Over 20 years ago, my parents had a one-room extension built on their small terraced house. This was to create some badly-needed space and one corner of it was taken out to be a shower-room/ WC. The room was planned so that it could easily take a double-bed with the idea that if my paternal grandparents wanted or needed to live with us, they could.

    That situation didn't occur and both of them have passed now, but the design means that my mother, who has Parkinson's, doesn't have to face a future of moving away from her home of nearly 50 years should she become unable to manage the stairs. All we young 'uns would have to do is to move the furniture. The shower stall is 3 ft square which means it can easily take the tall plastic stool if a sit-down shower experience is necessary.

    And, of course, the family have had the benefit of the extra space and the extra bathroom in the meantime. If retained, the £15k it cost (funded from savings) wouldn't have appreciated much due to lousy savings rates in the interim, and certainly would not have bought now what it bought then.

    I am not a property owner - unless one stretches the point to include the allotment's shed and cold frame - so my future proofing mainly involve being decluttered and remaining in a ground-floor flat with very close access to GP (200m) and many shops, libraries and other facilities within a 5 minute stroll. I most certainly won't be aiming to move out into the countryside, even when I am no longer in the workforce - current pension age 67 and retreating fast.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • frosty
    • By frosty 20th May 17, 8:18 AM
    • 1,100 Posts
    • 1,842 Thanks
    frosty
    I have my own cleaning business and have a lot of clients,their ages vary from 60 up to late 90's,and when I am cleaning out fridges and food cupboards it never ceases to amaze me what rubbish they eat.Very few eat fruit and veg,a lot of people just eat what they want and I wonder if they would have chronic health issues if they had a healthier diet.

    I am 54 and since eating nuts everyday feel my mental health has improved,and I am trying to exercise everyday.
    The elderly people I know just sit in their comfy chair watching tv.
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 20th May 17, 8:41 AM
    • 10,668 Posts
    • 148,397 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    As an 'elderly people' at 69 and He Who Knows at 72 and living in an area which has a high proportion of over 60s I don't actually know anyone in our age group who sits in watching TV all day, most people I know are avid gardeners and have productive veg plots and beautiful borders with velvety lawns in fact several open their gardens to the public in the yellow book scheme and for charity. Many others still cycle, play tennis and sail and certainly I see many older people on a daily basis when I walk dogs. We and many of our acquaintance also have allotments and far from only eating junk grow most of our own fruit and veg and have a pretty healthy and veg heavy diet.

    I think attitude towards getting older and staying positive helps enormously and I know how lucky we are to still be relatively healthy and able to be active in keeping a positive frame of mind. I don't think being focused on how you look or over analysing how you feel helps (not that I think any of us do this) but I have known people 'think' themselves old and incapacitated long before they actually are and give up on life by convincing themselves they can't walk far etc. That's where the problem lies in some cases rather than laziness and apathy!

    Well done Frosty for changing your diet and doing the exercise every day, positive steps towards your own health are a very sensible and 'prepping' thing to have done. Prepping doesn't just have to be sharpening your toothbrush handle to fend off the Zombies or wearing the tin hat it's also valid in the small things that anyone can do to improve their current lives and their lives in the future!
    Go forward with the vision even if no one else can see it!

    No amount of regretting can change the past, and no amount of worrying can change the future!
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 20th May 17, 8:45 AM
    • 12,880 Posts
    • 35,375 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    I have my own cleaning business and have a lot of clients,their ages vary from 60 up to late 90's,and when I am cleaning out fridges and food cupboards it never ceases to amaze me what rubbish they eat.Very few eat fruit and veg,a lot of people just eat what they want and I wonder if they would have chronic health issues if they had a healthier diet.

    I am 54 and since eating nuts everyday feel my mental health has improved,and I am trying to exercise everyday.
    The elderly people I know just sit in their comfy chair watching tv.
    Originally posted by frosty
    I'm also surprised by just how little fruit/veg most British people seem to eat and, to me, that goes a long way towards explaining the health problems many have. Part of my prepping is growing as much fruit/veg as I can in my garden. I major on growing fruit - as that's dearer than vegetables. Bit by bit and I'm getting my garden more together and I've got it to the stage currently where it's turning out a noticeable amount of stuff and I'm working on getting to a stage where it's turning out a lot more.

    That's precisely what concerns me - the mental vision of all those elderly people sitting in their chair watching tv. That's not my definition of Having A Life personally and I wouldnt see the point of doing that - unless maybe one was following a self worked out programme of study (ie watching things that would be educational - and not just "something to do to fill the time" type programmes).
    ploughing my own furrow...the rain begins with a single drop...

    #I'mWithNoel
    • kittie
    • By kittie 20th May 17, 8:45 AM
    • 10,771 Posts
    • 57,919 Thanks
    kittie
    money, the pilates ring is instinctive. I squeeze it with my hands and also with my knees. The elastic rope thing has handles and I just loop it around the newel post at the bottom of the stairs. I think I got them from aldi. I also have some simple weights. The cycling: I hated indoor exercise, dh used to do an hour on his turbo in the garage in winter and came in sweating. Just get a bike, plenty second hand, with 8 gears, learn to maintain it and get yourself out. Take in a few slopes, starting gradually. You can`t beat being out for well-being, it is so artificial to the body to be cycling indoors but ok, is good for the worried. I have a re-bounder on my landing, bouncing, star jumps is terrific for re-building bone density. At an older age, we all know I think, that osteoclasts dominate over osteoblasts and bone breaks down. Impact exercise builds bone. Also important to stop chronic inflammation, google how, as it is complex

    I put the un-saintly part of my diet on the eating for one thread but certainly not all of my food, in the main I eat much more good than bad. Berries every day, not much meat, not much fish any more (micro plastics in the sea). I think I eat at least 10 a day but in easy ways and a good soup is easy, not much fruit, no more than 2 a day. No getting away from the fact that it is veg that gives us our life source, including calcium from green leafy veg. You don`t have to eat kale but eating and growing the likes of easy-care perpetual spinach is good. Today I made veg soup and am back to veg juicing, had my juice and it was nice

    frosty, I eat nuts every day, not too many, mainly walnuts and almonds, sometimes if I need more all round protein, a few macadamia. A fav pud is stewed apple, berries, nuts and half a plain unsweetened yoghurt
    Last edited by kittie; 20-05-2017 at 8:51 AM.
    • kittie
    • By kittie 20th May 17, 8:49 AM
    • 10,771 Posts
    • 57,919 Thanks
    kittie
    I agree with your post mrsLW, most people on my allotment site are over 65 and they are always busy up there. Getting old can be an attitude of mind. I also agree with `money` as most people eat hardly any of natures bounty
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 20th May 17, 8:52 AM
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    • 35,375 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    I had a nice pudding the other day - soaked some oats in apple juice and then put in some grated apple and few berries. Scattered some nuts and more berries on top and baked.
    ploughing my own furrow...the rain begins with a single drop...

    #I'mWithNoel
    • kittie
    • By kittie 20th May 17, 8:59 AM
    • 10,771 Posts
    • 57,919 Thanks
    kittie
    I have to go but logged back in. Money, soak your nuts to activate the enzymes and I would not bake that pudding as the enzymes and vitamins will disappear. Soak the oats for several hours instead, they will turn creamy
    • frosty
    • By frosty 20th May 17, 9:23 AM
    • 1,100 Posts
    • 1,842 Thanks
    frosty
    I clean for a lot in sheltered housing,maybe if they had their own home and garden they would be more active,I don't think they realise that if they nourished their bodies better they would have more energy and better mental health.Its funny when I come bouncing into their home and they say "your always full of energy " I couldn't work as hard as you.
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 20th May 17, 9:43 AM
    • 27,494 Posts
    • 149,338 Thanks
    Karmacat
    One thing that I have definately observed with every person I know as they age is that decline in physical strength, mobility and overall health isn't ever a smoothly descending curve.

    Vitality goes down in sharp drops, with an injury or an illness being the trigger for a sudden decline in overall health and functionality. Oftentimes, the re-set is at a much lower level.
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    Omigod, that is *so* true. Thats exactly what I experienced in my mid 50s.

    I clean for a lot in sheltered housing,maybe if they had their own home and garden they would be more active,I don't think they realise that if they nourished their bodies better they would have more energy and better mental health.Its funny when I come bouncing into their home and they say "your always full of energy " I couldn't work as hard as you.
    Originally posted by frosty
    I remember when the research was being done that prompted the phrase "you are what you eat" - I was about 15, and I used to go into the adult library on the way home from school and read The Times about environmental incidents and research. And I remember how it was sneered at, that what you ate was a strong determinant of your health.

    This discussion has definitely got me thinking - it's time for me to buy a Kelley Kettle, the stainless steel 1.2 litre version with a pot support. £60 from the website, though I'll check on Amazon before I buy. I've made a rocket stove, insulated with vermiculite, which uses the same principles, but frankly its a bodge, and doesn't have the ease and safety levels that a Kelley will have. What's tipped me (because I've been thinking about it forever) is that I really do think we're close to another crash, and my options are so much more limited than they were in 2008. To paraphrase Scarlett O'Hara said in Gone With The Wind, I'm not going to be one of the ones that egt winnowed out

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