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  • FIRST POST
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 12th Jan 16, 5:38 PM
    • 217Posts
    • 252Thanks
    McTaggus
    The Scariest Thing I Have Ever Done....
    • #1
    • 12th Jan 16, 5:38 PM
    The Scariest Thing I Have Ever Done.... 12th Jan 16 at 5:38 PM
    So, I'm being a little premature by signing up here. I am on the verge of exchange as a FTB, and while I know that I still have many hurdles to cross before I actually start paying the mortgage, I have already made the decision that I want to be mortgage free as soon as is humanly possible - even if the powers that be are against me and this property falls through, I know that when we are in place I need to reduce my debt as soon as possible.


    I have been reading through all of your threads, and I'm amazed and inspired by all of your stories and its given me a huge kick to think how much I can save in interest alone (let alone building my equity faster) simply through overpayments. I have, however, set myself what feels like a pretty scary task ahead for my new home when it comes to aiming to become mortgage free in as little time as possible.


    Mortgage Value: £532,000
    LTV: 95%
    Monthly repayments: £2,600 per month for the first two years until fixed rate expires - then, it will all come down to where interest rates are
    Term: 31 Years


    Mortgage is solely in my name, but husband will be making contributions (he's still named on an ex's mortgage, and its complicated ). This is my house, for us to live in, and I'm going to pay for it without asking anyone else for a penny - aside from an equal contribution to the bills of course!


    I have worked out my budget, but my first year projections for overpayment are all going to come down to the actual completion date. If its ahead of March, I'll need to pay my interest free bridging loan back before I can make substantial overpayments, if its after March I should be able to start with OP's immediately.....


    My planned OP's right now are varying in projection between £500 a month and £1,000 a month - with some additional lump sum payments alongside helping my savings build up again having decimated them with the planned deposit.


    I have been reading all of your tips with interest, and will be posting more information and hoping for your help and support as I start this journey. I'm still deciding on my planned timeframe - I think my stretch target will be 15 years early, but its more likely to be 10 early (i.e. 20 years from now!!!!!!!). I could be around here for some time


    Updates to come as soon as we get our exchange and completion dates sorted.... and then planning can commence in full!


    Wish me luck.............!
Page 4
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 30th Sep 16, 11:12 AM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    Hi! Thanks for stopping by!

    We similarly had a bad landlord but were locked into a two year contract without a break clause, so made sure we started our hunt for somewhere suitable about a year into the contract so we could decide what kind of place we could afford and find the right place. We did look at some smaller places, knowing that the kids won't all be here every other weekend when they get into their later teens, but with the youngest only 8, realised that would still be quite some way away and we wanted to make sure we had space for the future. Our last place had 3 bedrooms, and the rows that used to break out between the girls were epic (over the most ridiculous of things!) we decided giving everyone their own space would give us our sanity too! Now we're here, we definitely made the right choice!

    Our momentum for the renovations definitely slowed during the warmer months! The hallway has now been bereft of wall paper and carpet for a couple of months, but I actually prefer that look right now to the hideousness that was there before so don't mind so much! You're right though, I have completely stopped noticing it though!

    The hallway was supposed to be the next part of our renovation of the old half of the house, but we realised there was little point getting it sorted until the bedrooms had been done - walls have been scraped getting old flooring out, mess all through the house trying to get old carpets out etc. - and we both agreed we would have been devastated had we had the hallway and stairs perfect, only to damage them in the process of sorting out upstairs! So, that got suspended and, now the weather is turning, our focus is turning back indoors. Hopefully we'll get some decent progress over the winter, before the sunshine tempts me back out to the garden again

    As for the smoking, congratulations on your quitting success!!! Personally I'm loving the e-cigarette! I haven't had (or wanted) a "normal" cigarette since I stopped earlier this year, and curiously the sight of seeing people light a cigarette seems like a totally alien action to me now - whereas before it would have made me want one myself! I've also started to notice I don't like the smell that hangs around smokers, so all good! I'm definitely with you in the "I'm soooooo glad I quit" - it's partly what's helping me to fund my OP's! I certainly would have found it much harder to attribute that money to the monthly OP's if I was still spending hundreds of pounds a months on cigarettes - I was a 30-40 day smoker, which is a terrifying amount spent on cigarettes when you aggregate that up on a weekly or monthly basis!
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 3rd Oct 16, 9:45 AM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    So, hubby and I went for a long walk yesterday to enjoy the sunshine and fresh air with the dogs. As always should be the case when you go for long walks in the countryside, there was a pub at the halfway point and a roast dinner waiting to be cooked when we got home.

    It while at said pub, that our conversation turned to money, work, and the mortgage - and how much we both wished our working lives didn't have to be dictated to by our need to earn substantial sums of money. I had actually been reading Mr Money Moustache's blog (from the start) on Friday while avoiding having to start writing a tedious presentation, and had found it extremely inspiring. So, over a pint in the sunshine, I said "What if we didn't have to do this? What if we completely commit to changing our way of living, and make our primary goal to try to get the damned mortgage paid off in the next ten years?" - I talked some more about how, about the money we spent that really we didn't have to, and that if we just made some changes then we could pay even more from the mortgage and maybe hit that goal. He looked at me a little sideways at first, thinking it was a pipe dream, and then got what can only be described as a look of absolute realisation that it could be possible. At that moment, he completely committed to what we decided wouldn't be frugal living - but a commitment to free living, with a choice over how we live.

    10 years is going to be really ambitious, I know. The reality is that means a monthly OP of 3000 pounds (compared to my currently comparably measly 500 pounds), but we have already started working out how we can get there. Our official start date for working towards this is going to be January 2017, as we have some expenses coming up the next couple of months, but we're going to do our best to do it.

    We're going to find fun challenges and ways to stretch and measure what we're NOT spending - gamefication of not spending, if you like - and other ways to motivate each other to stay on track and on goal. I'm so glad Mr McTaggus is so completely on board - he was on the making OP's, but to have him onboard on a journey to our mutual freedom from this never-ending stress and rat race cycle is even more important. It steps it up a gear, and gives us something to truly focus on achieving together.

    No other financial updates today, however, but looking forward to updating more beyond our current OP's as we start our journey proper!
    • daisy 1571
    • By daisy 1571 3rd Oct 16, 7:04 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 288 Thanks
    daisy 1571
    wow, that sounds like a conversation worth having. Well done, and loads of good luck for the journey ahead. It will be really hard I expect but the more you can commit then the easier it will be - and of course whats the worst that will happen if you miss this target ? You will still be miles ahead of where you would have been. Need to think about all sorts of ways to come up with that £3000 a month. Have you looked into having a lodger during the week ? There is a website somewhere that links people up for Monday to Thursdays (cos altho you have lots of bedrooms, I know you have the dsc at the weekends sometimes). Other than cutting out everything that we take for granted as "essentials" these days but really aren't, TV, out for meals, takeaways, holidays etc etc I cant think of much to offer other than my whole-hearted support.

    well done again

    daisy xx
    The difference between what you were yesterday and what you will be tomorrow is what you do today (I think I got this from MSE forum somewhere. If it was you - thankyou)
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 5th Oct 16, 9:53 AM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    Thank you Daisy for the encouragement, your ideas, and your support! It's greatly appreciated!!! It's definitely going to be tough, but we're going to do it - and are already planning a first venture into the world of boot fairs to sell some of the stuff we have accrued during the last few years that needs a new home!
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 12th Oct 16, 3:36 PM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    So, as a pre-emptive strike to prepare me for the 2017 plan of OP's, I have paid off my (very low interest) loan balance that was outstanding (only had a couple of months to run) but which now gives me an extra 895 per month that I couldn't previously enjoy. Oct, Nov and Dec pay checks will therefore use that total amount to top the savings back up to the level they were at previously, and sets me up for a 1,395 starting OP (all going to plan) for Jan 2017.

    That's halfway to my goal, which means I still have another 1,605 to find.... I think, if I really put my mind to it, I should be able to save another (minimum) 500 a month on my current expenditure, which should get me to 1,895 OP's a month, which would mean a 2030 mortgage repayment date rather than 2039 (based on my current OP's) or a mortgage repayment date of 2048 without any OP's...

    Better, but still not on the 10 year goal... more work to do, but getting there.... if my wonderful husband is able to commit some too (which he's hoping to be able to when the kids school trips are paid off) then we may get closer to the goal....! In the meantime, I''m reviewing what else we can potentially strip out to help!

    That's the update from McTaggus towers from now! Will keep you all posted on any next developments....
    • muhandis
    • By muhandis 12th Oct 16, 3:51 PM
    • 204 Posts
    • 81 Thanks
    muhandis
    This is great to hear. MMM completely changed the way I see life and money. As MMM says, the trick is to delink happiness and spending money so you don't see the new lifestyle as a sacrifice.

    If you're interested in a UK slant on the kind of things MMM talks about, check out the https://theescapeartist.me/

    Good luck with your journey, having your other half fully on board is half the battle won!

    So, hubby and I went for a long walk yesterday to enjoy the sunshine and fresh air with the dogs. As always should be the case when you go for long walks in the countryside, there was a pub at the halfway point and a roast dinner waiting to be cooked when we got home.

    It while at said pub, that our conversation turned to money, work, and the mortgage - and how much we both wished our working lives didn't have to be dictated to by our need to earn substantial sums of money. I had actually been reading Mr Money Moustache's blog (from the start) on Friday while avoiding having to start writing a tedious presentation, and had found it extremely inspiring. So, over a pint in the sunshine, I said "What if we didn't have to do this? What if we completely commit to changing our way of living, and make our primary goal to try to get the damned mortgage paid off in the next ten years?" - I talked some more about how, about the money we spent that really we didn't have to, and that if we just made some changes then we could pay even more from the mortgage and maybe hit that goal. He looked at me a little sideways at first, thinking it was a pipe dream, and then got what can only be described as a look of absolute realisation that it could be possible. At that moment, he completely committed to what we decided wouldn't be frugal living - but a commitment to free living, with a choice over how we live.

    10 years is going to be really ambitious, I know. The reality is that means a monthly OP of 3000 pounds (compared to my currently comparably measly 500 pounds), but we have already started working out how we can get there. Our official start date for working towards this is going to be January 2017, as we have some expenses coming up the next couple of months, but we're going to do our best to do it.

    We're going to find fun challenges and ways to stretch and measure what we're NOT spending - gamefication of not spending, if you like - and other ways to motivate each other to stay on track and on goal. I'm so glad Mr McTaggus is so completely on board - he was on the making OP's, but to have him onboard on a journey to our mutual freedom from this never-ending stress and rat race cycle is even more important. It steps it up a gear, and gives us something to truly focus on achieving together.

    No other financial updates today, however, but looking forward to updating more beyond our current OP's as we start our journey proper!
    Originally posted by McTaggus
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 13th Oct 16, 10:11 AM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    Oooh! More reading! I love it - thank you!!!!! I'm ALMOST caught up to date with MMM (have been reading the blog from the beginning) and it's already making me think so differently about EVERYTHING. I have even been thinking about potentially selling my car...... I own it outright, with no finance, but I hardly ever drive it and it sits on the driveway 6 days out of 7, is an expensive one to insure, tax and run... but, I love it.... so un-MMM thinking, I know, I need a slap....!
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 18th Oct 16, 1:26 PM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    So, hubby had his first "moustachian moment" since we made our agreement to start our journey next year. I think both of our mindsets have indelibly changed and the way that we're thinking about money has already dramatically shifted - which is great! It's amazing the transformation that seems to have happened to both of us pretty much overnight - and which truly made us realise how much of our money we have been wasting....

    The event? Meeting an old friend for dinner at Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester, who was on a flying visit to London from Singapore, and which had been arranged for a couple of months. Now, previously, we wouldn't have batted too much of an eyelid and just thought "Hey, it's a treat! Don't worry about it! We earned it!", but this time (after settling the bill and after said friend had departed) we both just kept staring at how much we had just paid for a f***ing dinner - and not an even remotely mind-blowing one at that. Total rip-off, and one we keep thinking about (repeatedly, since it happened) and kicking ourselves at having fallen into the "oh, let's have a bit of luxury over-priced consumerism!" trap a few months ago and didn't have the guts to back out of....

    My husband, bless him, is still in shock that we used to happily pay that much money for dinner - not on a regular basis I have to add - without thinking about it too much. He's also in shock that for a number of our friends, that's the "norm" for a night out. I'll be honest, it never became the "norm" for us, but now it will become the "never, ever again are we eating anywhere so expensive, EVER".

    We had also pre-booked a trip to Stockholm last weekend, using Avios so the flights were free, and spent the weekend in tiny restaurants under the joint challenge of eating out within a strict budget - which we managed! Wooohooo! Total spend for a weekend in Stockholm - 400 pounds all in, including flights, hotels, taxis and food. It's also our last trip anywhere this year, and our final indulgence of 2016 before we shift into hard-core MMM-ing to get the mortgage paid off.

    Trip aside, we were both also really pleased that our experiments at being MMM over the last two weeks are starting to pay off - we both spent a grand total of 72 pounds over the last 2 weeks (excluding the Swedish excursion and nauseating Dorchester bill, which would not be normal expenditure and will cease to happen in future), which included half a tank of petrol for my car I reckon we can do this!
    Last edited by McTaggus; 18-10-2016 at 1:43 PM.
    • try harder
    • By try harder 18th Oct 16, 1:45 PM
    • 178 Posts
    • 454 Thanks
    try harder
    Hi McTaggus,isnt it strange how the penny suddenly drops ,i too ,had a similar thing happen that made me realise how foolish i had been .I am just grateful that i didnt leave it so late that i could do nothing at all to change anything.I am thoroughly enjoying reading your diary ,you are doing just brilliant and i am looking forward to watching you squash that mortgage in the new year.
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 19th Oct 16, 2:35 PM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    Thanks Try Harder! And thanks for dropping by with your kind words of encouragement! Please don't take this the wrong way, but it's reassuring to know that I'm not the only one with past foolishness to look back guiltily on after the penny drops!!!!
    • Lrimas
    • By Lrimas 19th Oct 16, 10:16 PM
    • 79 Posts
    • 93 Thanks
    Lrimas
    Woohoo! What a talk with your OH. And what a turnaround! I'm a bit jealous as mine still hasn't seen the light. (He thinks that retiring early is an amazing idea and I think he thinks the £300 he puts away each month will get him there dispite multiple attempts from me to bring reality back )

    You probably don't want to hear this but at some stage (when your mortgage is on a lower rate) you will have to start investing instead of OPing. You have your head on straight so should be fine but it is a good idea to start doing research now.

    You are on a roll. Keep it up.
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 21st Oct 16, 12:08 PM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    Thanks Lrimas! Hope you can convince your OH eventually! It makes a huge difference not having someone beside you quietly encouraging you to "but we earned it" when you're trying to cut out spending!!

    Having read MMM from start to finish, and TEA, I fully agree. Investments (I'm slightly ashamed to say) are new territory for me so I'm trying to do some reading around the recommendations I keep seeing for Vanguard ETF's etc. If you have any recommendations for further reading, it would be really appreciated!

    I think in the short term, I at least want to get 25% of the mortgage paid down before I start looking to also diversify my monthly OP's into the investment route, but its definitely something I need to explore.

    I also took the (at the time, according to my peers) nerdy route of starting to pay into a company pension with matched contributions when I was 18 - and have been doing so ever since, without fail, for the last 16 years. Will need to check what the balances are and work out how much more is likely to have been paid in by the time I get to the end of my mortgage term too, so I can factor into some of my longer term planning.......
    • Tropically
    • By Tropically 21st Oct 16, 12:57 PM
    • 49 Posts
    • 150 Thanks
    Tropically
    It is so helpful to have a partner who not only supports you, but also takes it to the next level and truly wants to accomplish the goal with you. I'm still working on it... It's quite hard in London because it's very easy to have fancy dinners at the Dorchester. There is so much happening all the time and unlimited ways to spend money.

    Your trip to Stockholm sounds very frugal, especially given that it's an expensive place.
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 21st Oct 16, 1:37 PM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    Good grief - it must be so much harder in London. I'm actually thankful that we decided to move to a tiny village when we came back to the UK, which is a 30 min drive from the nearest town (or supermarket), and which only boasts one restaurant, one pub, a convenience store, a butchers, and a local farm shop! It means temptation / convenience isn't just sitting on my door step trying to tempt me out to spend my money after a hard day at work!

    It also means most of our shopping is now local for fresh food like meat and veg, as it is all produced in local farmland. Given the nearest supermarket is miles away, we also only use online shopping deliveries to get other regular household items delivered, which means my days of buying stuff I don't need in supermarkets because I'm a) hungry while food shopping or b) tempted by offers I don't actually need to have in my life are over!

    However, one surprising change since moving to the middle of nowhere, is that I have also discovered I have more recently begun to develop an increasingly deep-rooted fear / hatred of "going into town" to go shopping. The mere thought of going to department stores, or having to tackle the jam packed nearest High Street on a Saturday morning has actually started to make me feel positively anxious! As soon as I get back, I have to immediately go for a long walk in the countryside with the dogs to recover! Now, I buy pretty much everything online and avoid having to do it like the plague. Rewind just a few years, and I would have been there, every Saturday, for the WHOLE day!

    I know deepest, darkest countryside living isn't everyone's cup of tea, but I do wonder if it's subconsciously been the catalyst that got me onto this track in the first place - before I even consciously decided to make a change. Its almost like by removing myself from most of the influences has helped me to realise I probably didn't need them as much as I thought I did. Huge kudos to you Tropically, and anyone else, who gets onto this path and manages it while still living surrounded by such vast temptation (and social opportunities) every single day - I am in awe!
    • atypicalblonde
    • By atypicalblonde 21st Oct 16, 4:55 PM
    • 1,611 Posts
    • 8,435 Thanks
    atypicalblonde
    Hi McTaggus,

    I have just read your diary & will be cheering you on. MMM is very inspiring indeed, I have re-read a number of his posts several times over when I need inspiration.

    I hope hubby has calmed down over the food bill, though I have to admit it would take me a while! We've never spent over £100 on dinner for the two of us and even that seems a lot nowadays. Steak from the butcher, cava on offer and cauli cheese (homemade of course) - all enjoyed on my sofa in pjs - much more fun IMHO.

    Best of luck sweety x
    MFW
    Mortgage 8.2.15 - £171,064.64 Mortgage 3.11.16 - £139,251.40
    • wantabetterlife
    • By wantabetterlife 21st Oct 16, 10:13 PM
    • 1,208 Posts
    • 5,383 Thanks
    wantabetterlife
    Loving you diary mctaggus..you are doing great. We have also moved to the country recently and completely agree, when you are not surrounded by all the counsumerism it changes things for the better...I can notice it in my husband and kids too.
    Mortgage £177,750£172076.23
    Overpayments 2016 £1910.35
    Daily interest £19.91 £19.33
    BUY TO LET MORTGAGE £111408 £109975 £106734
    4.19 % paid
    Savings £970
    • chickadee
    • By chickadee 22nd Oct 16, 8:01 AM
    • 1,422 Posts
    • 5,364 Thanks
    chickadee
    Hello McTaggus,

    I stumbled across your blog and it is really interesting. It doesn't matter that you're in the SE and therefore salaries and mortgages are much higher than elsewhere, it's all relative. Just another zero on the end of the numbers, we all have the same goals.
    I'm in the NW so probably the polar opposite of your situation, and I work for a charity as well so salaries in my sector are much lower, but the principals are just the same.

    It sounds like you and DH are really on the same wavelength now which is good to hear. I'm still trying to convince my DH that we don't need to be going out for meals quite so frequently (not at Dorchester prices though, thank goodness!) but he still says the 'we deserve it' thing too often for my liking. What I believe we really deserve is to be able to make our own decisions about when and where we do things and for me this is about becoming financially independent. I too found MMM and after binge-reading it like you it just makes so much sense. DH rolls his eyes when I'm reading it but I think all he sees is the badassity stuff, he doesn't see through the americanised 'cult' thing as being just a characterisation and read the real messages in the blog. I have also found JD Roth's Money Boss blog quite interesting. He's a friend of MMM but what I like about him is that he's very open about having made stupid mistakes in the past, like spending thousands on comic books or investing in crazy shares on whims or 'tips' from people and losing the whole lot.
    I'm now mortgage-free and paying off my car loan which should be gone by May 17. Then I'm looking to really start hammering the investments with the aim of retiring in 8 years' time. By then I'll be 58 but this is about 10 years earlier than I would have done otherwise. Even the car loan makes me cringe now. I don't live far away from work but I bought a brand new car. I didn't really need it but I 'deserved it!'
    Oh well, hindsight is wonderful. I'm glad you saw the light earlier than me and good luck with your journey. It sounds like you really have your head screwed on now. Well done on your progress so far and I like the diary.
    Sealed Pot Challenge #8 £341.90
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    Sealed Pot Challenge #10 Member #36
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 25th Oct 16, 10:42 AM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    Thank you all so much for your lovely comments, it's so lovely to find like-minded folk! Congrats on being mortgage free Chickadee! Sounds wonderful!!

    It's funny how other people (outside of the MFW board) react to the idea. We had a family gathering recently, and I shared "the plan" as well as the reason why I would like us all to agree to not buying Xmas presents this year. My father is over the moon and it turns out he's a secret MMM reader too, my mother (bless her) thought it was a "lovely idea" and is now sending me articles she has cut out of the newspaper about how its better to pay off your mortgage than to have savings, and my younger sister (drowning in debt and still a spend-a-holic) just looked at me like I had turned into an incoherent dribbling idiot and said "but why would you do that when you have so much money you can just spend on other things, like finance an awesome brand new car or something, because yours is already 10 years old......"

    I don't think my sister is going to become a convert any time soon....

    In other news, an unexpected and unplanned financial set back happened this week. The field at the very end of our lane was put up for auction by a local landowner. Some of our neighbours started a bit of a local community action group, with the intention of buying the land via private sale, so as to protect the green space and therefore the value of our houses on the lane. However, the action group didn't between them have sufficient funds so started a bit of a fundraising appeal from the other residents and we agreed to commit some funds as our house would be as affected by any if planning permission was granted on the land.

    So, my emergency saving fund, which had been partially earmarked for investments, has been depleted now that we have secured the private sale of the land. In many ways, it is an investment in protecting the value of our house, but equally it is also now dead money...... Ho hum, not a lot I can do about that one, but a little bit gutted about the short term set back. I shall keep looking to the longer term and thinking it's a drop in the ocean, but still disappointed to see both savings depleted and the short term plan having to be suspended.

    Onwards and upwards! After all, there will always be set backs along the way - even if it means we don't hit 10 years, it's still a journey to not doing this for 31 years!
    • McTaggus
    • By McTaggus 22nd Nov 16, 10:38 AM
    • 217 Posts
    • 252 Thanks
    McTaggus
    So, despite the set back that has come from investing in our "community asset" (which is now the subject of debate as to what to do with it in the future), I have been relentless in my pursuit of changing my ways! Some have been more successful than others, but I'm reminding myself that every change is a step on a far longer journey to happiness than can be achieved in just a couple of months:

    Step 1: A first foray into the world of Ziffit. We cleared out our library of old Xbox games, DVD's, Blu-Rays etc., most of which hadn't been touched since they were first watched!! Total accepted value, GBP195 now pending payment into my bank account! Hurrah! That will pay for the new carpet in the youngest's newly finished bedroom (which we spent all of last weekend painting!)

    Step 2: Facebook sales. I had tried Shpock before with no success, but was astonished to sell both an old TV and now defunct bunk beds within an hour of each of them being listed. Total value GBP65! Hurrah!

    Given I used to just bundle everything off to the charity shop (the perils of being time poor!) I'm delighted by our little haul! Clearly the way forward for the future!!

    No more further OP's aside from the regular GBP500 overpayment so far, but we're still laying the groundwork for doing so in the New Year. Have also cut the "relax with wine" expenditure (hubby less happy with that one) but we're sticking to a new revised budget and hopeful that once Christmas is out of the way we'll be in a much better place!

    That's it from the McTaggus clan for now - hope you are all well!
    • Jinxii
    • By Jinxii 23rd Nov 16, 9:19 PM
    • 113 Posts
    • 818 Thanks
    Jinxii
    Hi McTaggus, just wanted to say I've just finished reading your thread and it's really helped to assuage the fear of taking on a monster mortgage! My partner and I are in our mid-twenties and about to exchange on a property that comes with a £385K whopper (68% LTV), and although I am super excited I am also quite overwhelmed with the amount of money involved. Our mortgage is over 25 years but I'm very keen to have it paid off ASAP (and dabble a toe or two into the world of investments!)

    Please keep posting, I'm finding your outlook and approach very inspiring!
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