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  • FIRST POST
    • dericS
    • By dericS 1st Aug 15, 2:51 PM
    • 21Posts
    • 4Thanks
    dericS
    Smart meters - what is the catch?
    • #1
    • 1st Aug 15, 2:51 PM
    Smart meters - what is the catch? 1st Aug 15 at 2:51 PM
    Official MoneySavingExpert Note November 2017:

    We now have a dedicated Smart Meters guide that may be of use.

    Back to dericS' original post...

    ----

    Hello

    I have received 3 letters from my energy provider recently urging me to install smart gas and electricity energy meters. I have done a bit of research on the pros and cons and actually think the idea is a rather good one. I like the notion of 'saving' by isolating the times when usage is heaviest and targeting ways of reducing consumption (or changing my habits to use energy at cheaper times).

    However - there are several concerning 'cons' to this which I wanted to get other views on - specifically, the notion that energy companies can save costs by being able to remotely read meters - not in itself a bad thing - but will these cost savings be passed on to the consumer? Additionally, I am disturbed by the prospect that energy companies could tailor our bills so that they could charge us more for heavy usage even when we are not using the energy at peak times.

    I'd be interested to hear what others think of smart meters, whether anybody has already installed them (and what savings have you made?!) and whether it really is a viable option to revert back to the existing meters if smart meters do not work for you?

    Thanks for your thoughts.
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 09-11-2017 at 2:31 PM.
Page 7
    • FOREVER21
    • By FOREVER21 17th Mar 17, 10:11 PM
    • 1,696 Posts
    • 1,004 Thanks
    FOREVER21
    Wait, wait and wait. BG are still rolling out SMETS1 meters which are supplier dependent. If you are keen on getting a smart meter then, from 2018 onwards, all smart meters will be SMETS2 compliant which will allow supplier switching.
    Originally posted by Hengus
    I don't think from the tone of their post MarjT, is keen on getting a smart meter.

    MarjT, I am in the similar position to you, keep getting asked if I want a smart meter. I don't, I too know how much electricity/gas is used by various appliances and submit regular meter readings and never get estimated bills.

    Do as I do just keep refusing, it is not compulsory to have smart meters.
    • MarjT
    • By MarjT 18th Mar 17, 8:13 AM
    • 4 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    MarjT
    Thank you for the replies, I will wait until I they are compulsory.
    My mind is made up.
    MarjT.
    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 18th Mar 17, 9:25 AM
    • 4,516 Posts
    • 2,693 Thanks
    Hengus
    I don't think from the tone of their post MarjT, is keen on getting a smart meter.

    MarjT, I am in the similar position to you, keep getting asked if I want a smart meter. I don't, I too know how much electricity/gas is used by various appliances and submit regular meter readings and never get estimated bills.

    Do as I do just keep refusing, it is not compulsory to have smart meters.
    Originally posted by FOREVER21
    Smart meters will become the only option when your present meter reaches its end of life. That said, whilst you cannot refuse to have a new meter fitted in these circumstances, the present policy appears to be that consumers can elect to have the communications features disabled. Clearly, these meters will be more difficult to read as many posters have already found out.
    • brewerdave
    • By brewerdave 18th Mar 17, 10:47 AM
    • 4,558 Posts
    • 1,887 Thanks
    brewerdave
    Having just switched away from EON (Who kept chasing me re smart meters !) I'm assuming that the smaller suppliers such as IRESA and Better Energy have no obligations re the installation of smart meters ??
    • SpotlandRules
    • By SpotlandRules 18th Mar 17, 10:48 AM
    • 158 Posts
    • 61 Thanks
    SpotlandRules
    I have smart meters, just got scottish power ones installed yesterday, and had them with OVO previously.

    They do not work with my tariff (Power Up), but I knew that when I asked for them to be installed. However, they had helped me cut around 2kWh a day off my usage, around £2 a week.

    The info from the IHD is really useful, and helps me keep track of my daily usage,

    I have had a water meter fitted since 2011 and have immediately reaped the benefits from this and found I have with the energy ones.

    I ignore the scare stories, they may be true, they may be not, but life has risks.
    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 18th Mar 17, 11:12 AM
    • 4,516 Posts
    • 2,693 Thanks
    Hengus
    Having just switched away from EON (Who kept chasing me re smart meters !) I'm assuming that the smaller suppliers such as IRESA and Better Energy have no obligations re the installation of smart meters ??
    Originally posted by brewerdave
    There will be an obligation placed on all suppliers to install smart meters when SMETS2 compliant meters are available. The aim of the stuttering start to this project was to allow the big suppliers time to update their systems etc, and to agree a final technical standard. Smaller suppliers are sitting back watching, and waiting to see which of the many variations of smart meters have the least problems.
    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 18th Mar 17, 11:24 AM
    • 4,516 Posts
    • 2,693 Thanks
    Hengus
    I have smart meters, just got scottish power ones installed yesterday, and had them with OVO previously.

    They do not work with my tariff (Power Up), but I knew that when I asked for them to be installed. However, they had helped me cut around 2kWh a day off my usage, around £2 a week.

    The info from the IHD is really useful, and helps me keep track of my daily usage,

    I have had a water meter fitted since 2011 and have immediately reaped the benefits from this and found I have with the energy ones.

    I ignore the scare stories, they may be true, they may be not, but life has risks.
    Originally posted by SpotlandRules
    The Government now estimates that homeowners will save an average of £11 per year when a smart meter is fitted. So, in your case, energy consumers have spent over £800 to save you £100 a year. I am not sure that this argument makes any economic sense when you could have got the same information as you are getting now from a £50 energy meter. Bear in mind that one of the reasons for the extraordinary increase in electricity prices this year is due to the £12Bn cost of this extremely poorly managed Government-led project.
    • SpotlandRules
    • By SpotlandRules 18th Mar 17, 12:16 PM
    • 158 Posts
    • 61 Thanks
    SpotlandRules
    I will be honest. It was not until I started up a spreadsheet, that I realised where savings could be made. The IHD that was given to me by OVO, was really useless. It was difficult to compare monthly usage.

    Yes, spending £800 for me to save £100 is not economically sound, unless there is an ulterior motive in the years to come, either by selling off our usage data, or by having peak and off-peak rates. Anything which is Government led, is normally poorly managed, so this is of no big surprise.

    I have noticed, in the main, that prepay with smart meters, is cheaper than prepay without. I will also add that in addition to the £2 a week saving, having a prepay smart meter enabled me to come off prepay meters and onto credit meters. So in addition to the £2 a week I have saved, my unit rates are now also far less, so am also saving around the same again, by being on credit meters. I could have got cheaper rates, but being entitled to WHD, I had to move to a supplier who provided this, which then takes me down to the cheapest possible electricity unit rates.

    So for me, I have really benefited. My electricity has never been as cheap and this is down to smart meters.
    • JDC2017
    • By JDC2017 9th Jun 17, 9:47 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    JDC2017
    A cautionary tale!
    A few weeks ago a meter reader called at the door for access to read the meter. Whilst reading the meter he told me that the area was being fitted with smart meters and he had to arrange appointments for smart meters to be fitted with those people found at home. The meter reader then said that he would need to check all the appliances in the house and he duly inspected the meters, gas cooker, warm air system and flues etc. He then phoned his head office and an appointment was duly made for a few weeks hence.

    The meter fitters arrived on the agreed date (two fitters in two Eon vans). One fitter said he would have to replace a gas pipe as well as the gas meter and the other fitter said that would replace the electric meter and asked to be shown all the electrical and gas appliances in the house even going into the loft.

    As it happens, there had been a small gas leak on our previous suppliers (npower) side of the gas supply a few years ago which meant that npower replaced all their gas pipework up to our gas meter. Additionally, the gas meter was replaced with a new gas meter approx four years ago so the gas meter and its pipework had previously all been thoroughly tested, checked and passed by experienced engineers.

    The fitters were finished in a couple of hours and the one who had fitted the new electric meter began explaining how things worked and the handed me a card headed 'Safety Notice' which went on to state that: 'It appears that the gas installation pipework fitted at your property may not have Electrical Equipotential bonding correctly fitted . I am required under section 18(2) of the Gas Safety (Installation and Use Regulations) 1998 to advise you that the Electrical Installation should be checked by a competent electrical contractor.' The electric meter fitter then pointed to an electrical earth connection and stated that it was up to me to find and employ an electricial contractor to certify the electrical work as safe.

    I immediately realised that this certification would cost me a minimum of £150 - £200. I told the Eon employees that the installation had been previously classed as safe and at no time during their two surveys had I been informed that the installation would require to be certified as safe or indeed would involve me in any expense. I also told them that, since their work had caused the installation to be not safe, I regarded their job as not being complete and asked for the telephone number of their supervisor. The senior fitter repeatedly refused to give the telephone number of his supervisor saying he was not allowed to give the number out to people and would only refer me to EON Customer Serices.

    Despite being politely requested to wait whilst Eon Customer Services were contacted, the fitters immediately collected their tools and left with no further explanation as to the work they had done, how the meters worked or why the meter display screens were blank etc. Indeed, such was their haste to leave that they even had to be called back to replace the entrance cover to the loft.

    The Eon Customer Services number simply rings out and out with no reply and a link for eon-uk.com/smartmeterinstallfeedback is either broken or dead.

    All in all, having experienced an Eon Smart Meter installation, I would be quite cautious of accepting Eons smart meter offer at face value. In the event of accepting their offer I would also suggest being very clear indeed as to what work is to be done, who is responsible for certification and what your costs and expenses are going to be.


    Hope this helps.
    • LeeUK
    • By LeeUK 9th Jun 17, 1:33 PM
    • 5,589 Posts
    • 2,581 Thanks
    LeeUK
    A few weeks ago a meter reader called at the door for access to read the meter. Whilst reading the meter he told me that the area was being fitted with smart meters and he had to arrange appointments for smart meters to be fitted with those people found at home. The meter reader then said that he would need to check all the appliances in the house and he duly inspected the meters, gas cooker, warm air system and flues etc. He then phoned his head office and an appointment was duly made for a few weeks hence.

    The meter fitters arrived on the agreed date (two fitters in two Eon vans). One fitter said he would have to replace a gas pipe as well as the gas meter and the other fitter said that would replace the electric meter and asked to be shown all the electrical and gas appliances in the house even going into the loft.

    As it happens, there had been a small gas leak on our previous suppliers (npower) side of the gas supply a few years ago which meant that npower replaced all their gas pipework up to our gas meter. Additionally, the gas meter was replaced with a new gas meter approx four years ago so the gas meter and its pipework had previously all been thoroughly tested, checked and passed by experienced engineers.

    The fitters were finished in a couple of hours and the one who had fitted the new electric meter began explaining how things worked and the handed me a card headed 'Safety Notice' which went on to state that: 'It appears that the gas installation pipework fitted at your property may not have Electrical Equipotential bonding correctly fitted . I am required under section 18(2) of the Gas Safety (Installation and Use Regulations) 1998 to advise you that the Electrical Installation should be checked by a competent electrical contractor.' The electric meter fitter then pointed to an electrical earth connection and stated that it was up to me to find and employ an electricial contractor to certify the electrical work as safe.

    I immediately realised that this certification would cost me a minimum of £150 - £200. I told the Eon employees that the installation had been previously classed as safe and at no time during their two surveys had I been informed that the installation would require to be certified as safe or indeed would involve me in any expense. I also told them that, since their work had caused the installation to be not safe, I regarded their job as not being complete and asked for the telephone number of their supervisor. The senior fitter repeatedly refused to give the telephone number of his supervisor saying he was not allowed to give the number out to people and would only refer me to EON Customer Serices.

    Despite being politely requested to wait whilst Eon Customer Services were contacted, the fitters immediately collected their tools and left with no further explanation as to the work they had done, how the meters worked or why the meter display screens were blank etc. Indeed, such was their haste to leave that they even had to be called back to replace the entrance cover to the loft.

    The Eon Customer Services number simply rings out and out with no reply and a link for eon-uk.com/smartmeterinstallfeedback is either broken or dead.

    All in all, having experienced an Eon Smart Meter installation, I would be quite cautious of accepting Eons smart meter offer at face value. In the event of accepting their offer I would also suggest being very clear indeed as to what work is to be done, who is responsible for certification and what your costs and expenses are going to be.


    Hope this helps.
    Originally posted by JDC2017
    I know one thing for sure, any meter reader turning up at my door spouting nonsense about smart meters being installed in the area and that I have to have them will be told where to go. I certainly won't be allowing him to be snooping around checking all my appliances either.

    Sounds dodgy to me.

    My gas meter doesn't have Electrical Equipotential bonding either. Didn't stop the gas supplier installing the meter nor did it stop my boiler installers.
    Last edited by LeeUK; 09-06-2017 at 1:35 PM.
    • jack_pott
    • By jack_pott 9th Jun 17, 2:24 PM
    • 4,260 Posts
    • 5,471 Thanks
    jack_pott
    What pipework did they replace? Have they removed some existing bonding along with the old pipe?

    If they've disconnected the existing bonding from the old pipe they ought to reconnect it to the new pipe. If there none in the first place, they're just pointing out that you'll have to fit it if you want your system brought up to current standards, and that an electrician will be able to advise.
  • E.ON Company Representative: Malc
    E.ON Smart Meters
    A few weeks ago a meter reader called at the door for access to read the meter. Whilst reading the meter he told me that the area was being fitted with smart meters and he had to arrange appointments for smart meters to be fitted with those people found at home. The meter reader then said that he would need to check all the appliances in the house and he duly inspected the meters, gas cooker, warm air system and flues etc. He then phoned his head office and an appointment was duly made for a few weeks hence.

    The meter fitters arrived on the agreed date (two fitters in two Eon vans). One fitter said he would have to replace a gas pipe as well as the gas meter and the other fitter said that would replace the electric meter and asked to be shown all the electrical and gas appliances in the house even going into the loft.

    As it happens, there had been a small gas leak on our previous suppliers (npower) side of the gas supply a few years ago which meant that npower replaced all their gas pipework up to our gas meter. Additionally, the gas meter was replaced with a new gas meter approx four years ago so the gas meter and its pipework had previously all been thoroughly tested, checked and passed by experienced engineers.

    The fitters were finished in a couple of hours and the one who had fitted the new electric meter began explaining how things worked and the handed me a card headed 'Safety Notice' which went on to state that: 'It appears that the gas installation pipework fitted at your property may not have Electrical Equipotential bonding correctly fitted . I am required under section 18(2) of the Gas Safety (Installation and Use Regulations) 1998 to advise you that the Electrical Installation should be checked by a competent electrical contractor.' The electric meter fitter then pointed to an electrical earth connection and stated that it was up to me to find and employ an electricial contractor to certify the electrical work as safe.

    I immediately realised that this certification would cost me a minimum of £150 - £200. I told the Eon employees that the installation had been previously classed as safe and at no time during their two surveys had I been informed that the installation would require to be certified as safe or indeed would involve me in any expense. I also told them that, since their work had caused the installation to be not safe, I regarded their job as not being complete and asked for the telephone number of their supervisor. The senior fitter repeatedly refused to give the telephone number of his supervisor saying he was not allowed to give the number out to people and would only refer me to EON Customer Serices.

    Despite being politely requested to wait whilst Eon Customer Services were contacted, the fitters immediately collected their tools and left with no further explanation as to the work they had done, how the meters worked or why the meter display screens were blank etc. Indeed, such was their haste to leave that they even had to be called back to replace the entrance cover to the loft.

    The Eon Customer Services number simply rings out and out with no reply and a link for eon-uk.com/smartmeterinstallfeedback is either broken or dead.

    All in all, having experienced an Eon Smart Meter installation, I would be quite cautious of accepting Eons smart meter offer at face value. In the event of accepting their offer I would also suggest being very clear indeed as to what work is to be done, who is responsible for certification and what your costs and expenses are going to be.


    Hope this helps.
    Originally posted by JDC2017
    Hello JDC2017 and welcome to the Forums.

    I'm sorry you're unhappy with the work our smart meter technicians did. I'd recommend raising this directly with our smart teams. Contact details are on our website under 'Help and Support.' They'll raise a complaint, investigate the job done and offer a resolution. They'll also be able to help you understand the meters better and, if required, arrange further instruction.

    As with all work of this kind, whether on smart or traditional meters, our technicians have a duty of care to point out to customers any potential problems or risks they see. This includes where installations don't meet current industry standards. Sometimes, these things aren't apparent until the work is actually being done. Not saying this is the case here, it's just something that can happen.

    On the meter, the displays could be in standby mode. Depending on the make, pressing any buttons on the meter might re-activate the display. Again, our smart teams will be able to help with this.

    Hope this helps point you in the right direction JDC2017.

    Malc
    Official Company Representative
    I am an official company representative of E.ON. MSE has given permission for me to post in response to queries about the company, so that I can help solve issues. You can see my name on the companies with permission to post list. I am not allowed to tout for business at all. If you believe I am please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com This does NOT imply any form of approval of my company or its products by MSE"
    • Hasbeen
    • By Hasbeen 9th Jun 17, 5:21 PM
    • 905 Posts
    • 660 Thanks
    Hasbeen
    A few weeks ago a meter reader called at the door for access to read the meter. Whilst reading the meter he told me that the area was being fitted with smart meters and he had to arrange appointments for smart meters to be fitted with those people found at home. The meter reader then said that he would need to check all the appliances in the house and he duly inspected the meters, gas cooker, warm air system and flues etc. He then phoned his head office and an appointment was duly made for a few weeks hence.

    The meter fitters arrived on the agreed date (two fitters in two Eon vans). One fitter said he would have to replace a gas pipe as well as the gas meter and the other fitter said that would replace the electric meter and asked to be shown all the electrical and gas appliances in the house even going into the loft.

    As it happens, there had been a small gas leak on our previous suppliers (npower) side of the gas supply a few years ago which meant that npower replaced all their gas pipework up to our gas meter. Additionally, the gas meter was replaced with a new gas meter approx four years ago so the gas meter and its pipework had previously all been thoroughly tested, checked and passed by experienced engineers.

    The fitters were finished in a couple of hours and the one who had fitted the new electric meter began explaining how things worked and the handed me a card headed 'Safety Notice' which went on to state that: 'It appears that the gas installation pipework fitted at your property may not have Electrical Equipotential bonding correctly fitted . I am required under section 18(2) of the Gas Safety (Installation and Use Regulations) 1998 to advise you that the Electrical Installation should be checked by a competent electrical contractor.' The electric meter fitter then pointed to an electrical earth connection and stated that it was up to me to find and employ an electricial contractor to certify the electrical work as safe.

    I immediately realised that this certification would cost me a minimum of £150 - £200. I told the Eon employees that the installation had been previously classed as safe and at no time during their two surveys had I been informed that the installation would require to be certified as safe or indeed would involve me in any expense. I also told them that, since their work had caused the installation to be not safe, I regarded their job as not being complete and asked for the telephone number of their supervisor. The senior fitter repeatedly refused to give the telephone number of his supervisor saying he was not allowed to give the number out to people and would only refer me to EON Customer Serices.

    Despite being politely requested to wait whilst Eon Customer Services were contacted, the fitters immediately collected their tools and left with no further explanation as to the work they had done, how the meters worked or why the meter display screens were blank etc. Indeed, such was their haste to leave that they even had to be called back to replace the entrance cover to the loft.

    The Eon Customer Services number simply rings out and out with no reply and a link for eon-uk.com/smartmeterinstallfeedback is either broken or dead.

    All in all, having experienced an Eon Smart Meter installation, I would be quite cautious of accepting Eons smart meter offer at face value. In the event of accepting their offer I would also suggest being very clear indeed as to what work is to be done, who is responsible for certification and what your costs and expenses are going to be.


    Hope this helps.
    Originally posted by JDC2017
    There are no costs or expenses? as it is only a recommendation to get the bonding installed to comply with current fittings.

    You can get it done if you wish, it means running an earth wire from the gas pipe back to the earth point at the meter/consumer unit.

    But along with the majority of the properties in the UK who do not have it, it is not something to be worried about.
    • MothballsWallet
    • By MothballsWallet 9th Jun 17, 6:17 PM
    • 11,435 Posts
    • 15,025 Thanks
    MothballsWallet
    Okay, I haven't read the full thread (shame on me), but I'll weight in with my opinion on smart meters for what it's worth:

    I want smart meters, but I'll wait until I can get a SMETS2-compatible one because I do switch suppliers to get a better deal so a SMETS1-compatible meter probably isn't any good to me unless it can be made compatible with the DCC.

    People saying the suppliers should be given the right to cut people's energy off if they refuse one: well, I'm a bit on the fence over this - I can see sacsquacco's point on energy theft, but this does put the UK at risk of breaking European and UN treaty agreements. Access to clean water is a UN defined right, and I think access to gas & electricity for heating and cleaning may also be a defined right.

    Oh, and to walkon: the EM spectrum is very broad - it starts with radio waves at the low end (so Hertz (Hz) up to Megahertz (MHz)), infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, microwaves, X rays and gamma rays at the high end.

    X and gamma ray exposure can cause radiation sickness, cancer and even death in high enough exposures There are also cosmic rays that are outside the EM spectrum that can also cause severe damage to the human body.
    • Source 1: BBC BiteSize page here.
    • Source 2: Video by potholer54 on YouTube

    (Btw, potholer54 is former BBC science correspondent Peter Hadfield.)

    Cancers can also be caused by sufficient exposure to certain chemicals (such as benzene, which is used in petrol) and beta radiation.

    (Also btw, I put that list together based on memory of my secondary school physics and chemistry knowledge - radio communications was a specialist topic module on my physics syllabus.)

    If you want to reduce your EM exposure risk while using a mobile phone, then get a headset or an earpiece.
    Always ask yourself one question: What would Gibbs do?
    Married to an immigrant.
    Even my PC is nicknamed "GIBBS".
    • JDC2017
    • By JDC2017 11th Jun 17, 1:48 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    JDC2017
    Thanks for all the very helpful suggestions and tips. Hopefully, I can clarify some doubts as follows;

    The meter and its pipework were 'legal' prior to eon replacing it. The smaller replacement meter and its new pipework layout means that the meters earth bonding now requires a Safety Notice.

    Domestic electrical work has, since January 2005, been subject to Building Control Regulations and has to be certified by a 'competent person' who is registered under the scheme. Part P of the Building Control Regulations covers alterations to existing circuits etc and is meant to prevent fires and electric shocks. Any Wiring is meant to conform to BS7671 standards. Changing a light bulb or replacing a fauly switch is OK but anything beyond that is not.

    I am not a 'competent person' to run extra earth cable or resite an earth bonding connection. Also, selling our house in the future will mean supplying certificates relating to any wiring alterations.

    Eon never informed me, prior to work starting, that I would be advised to employ an electrical contractor to fully complete the job.

    As for suggestions that the Safety Notice is just advice and can be disregarded - well everything is ok so long as everything is ok but If something goes wrong then, of course, disregarding the Safety Notice becomes important.

    It will all be sorted out of course but, all in all, I still think its unfair for ordinary householders to be misled after promises of free installation.
    John
    • Carrot007
    • By Carrot007 11th Jun 17, 2:44 PM
    • 676 Posts
    • 553 Thanks
    Carrot007
    Eon never informed me, prior to work starting, that I would be advised to employ an electrical contractor to fully complete the job.
    Originally posted by JDC2017
    It's not their fault it is not compliant.

    Nor are they forcing you to fix it. If it was a major problem they would have capped off the gas.

    Also anyone working on the gas should previously have told you this as it is a requirement to test for all sorts of things after the gas goes off and on again. You can't blame them for previous idiots doing half a job.

    I did not have bonding either. But when I got my kitchen hob changed they added it at no extra cost. a couple of connectors and a few metres of earth cable is not much.
    Last edited by Carrot007; 11-06-2017 at 2:45 PM. Reason: hob not job ;-)
    • badmemory
    • By badmemory 11th Jun 17, 2:59 PM
    • 940 Posts
    • 975 Thanks
    badmemory
    JDC are you saying that it was compliant before they touched it and wasn't afterwards? If so then a letter marked COMPLAINT making this clear would seem like a good idea.
    • jack_pott
    • By jack_pott 11th Jun 17, 3:30 PM
    • 4,260 Posts
    • 5,471 Thanks
    jack_pott
    Thanks for all the very helpful suggestions and tips. Hopefully, I can clarify some doubts as follows;

    The meter and its pipework were 'legal' prior to eon replacing it.
    Originally posted by JDC2017
    But what do you mean by 'legal'? It's not illegal to have an existing installation that's not compliant with current regs, it's just illegal to do any new work that's non compliant. New editions of the wiring regulations are not retrospective, otherwise every house in the country would need rewiring each time they're revised. I doubt replacing a gas pipe will count as new electrical work as long as they replaced the bonding as they found it, but it's reasonable that they would leave you with a warning if it's not up to date.

    Unless they have changed your electrical installation in some way, it's no less safe than it was before they came, in which case it's not their job to upgrade it.
    Last edited by jack_pott; 11-06-2017 at 3:38 PM.
    • vanginger
    • By vanginger 11th Jun 17, 8:14 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    vanginger
    Usability after switching
    Hi
    Hoping someone here can help us out too. We got our Smart Meter with nPower in April and then switched to EDF just last month.
    I do realise that it may well lose it's connectivity with our provider having switched but it did seem to work for a few days, I am sure the tariff changed on-screen.
    However, the smartmeters outside suddenly stopped communicating with the display in the kitchen. Any time I try turn it on now, it just says connecting to smart meter. Now surely it wouldn't lose this functionality? I should still be able to read it in the kitchen, even if I don't get detailed tariff data?
    The WAN and HAN lights are flashing steadily, one amber, one green, whereas the power one is steady.

    First of all, is anyone aware of if the display should still work, and if it does, whose responsibility is it to fix? nPowers as they installed it?
    I tried talking to both, nPower have not yet replied, EDF - I only get through to basic level contacts and they just say it won't work at all having changed supplier, I am not sure I believe them though!

    Thanks in advance
    • MeterMan
    • By MeterMan 11th Jun 17, 8:35 PM
    • 278 Posts
    • 152 Thanks
    MeterMan
    Hi
    Hoping someone here can help us out too. We got our Smart Meter with nPower in April and then switched to EDF just last month.
    I do realise that it may well lose it's connectivity with our provider having switched but it did seem to work for a few days, I am sure the tariff changed on-screen.
    However, the smartmeters outside suddenly stopped communicating with the display in the kitchen. Any time I try turn it on now, it just says connecting to smart meter. Now surely it wouldn't lose this functionality? I should still be able to read it in the kitchen, even if I don't get detailed tariff data?
    The WAN and HAN lights are flashing steadily, one amber, one green, whereas the power one is steady.

    First of all, is anyone aware of if the display should still work, and if it does, whose responsibility is it to fix? nPowers as they installed it?
    I tried talking to both, nPower have not yet replied, EDF - I only get through to basic level contacts and they just say it won't work at all having changed supplier, I am not sure I believe them though!

    Thanks in advance
    Originally posted by vanginger
    The displays may work after switching, but nothing is guaranteed. Your current supplier is responsible for your meters, even though Npower fitted them.

    It is a much publicised issue that smart meters revert to 'dumb' once you have changed supplier. When SMETS2 meters are being installed, SMETS1 meters will be made to communicate with DCC
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