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  • FIRST POST
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 8th Mar 15, 11:07 PM
    • 5,823Posts
    • 30,231Thanks
    AlexLK
    Renovations and Repayments.
    • #1
    • 8th Mar 15, 11:07 PM
    Renovations and Repayments. 8th Mar 15 at 11:07 PM
    Hello and welcome to visitors familiar with my journey thus far and are surprised to see me on such a sensible board and a further warm welcome to the new faces wondering what they've let themselves in for.

    Let me begin by clarifying a few points: the first one is I am not sure whether I'm actually serious or not about clearing my mortgage and the second is the fact my house needs quite a bit of work doing to it. This work I do myself and in the time my wife and I have lived in the house we've learnt all kinds of new skills. The current project involves renewing the windows and I am making the frames myself, two are done and I'm pleased to say look great.

    I plan to use this mortgage free (how very grown up) diary to document the renovations and my savings activities, out of which overpayments may or may not be made. However, I am fully committed to long term saving and making as much money as possible. A long term goal of mine is to add to the BTL portfolio I shall one day inherit and am already becoming more involved in which is perhaps a good reason to pay my mortgage off and make my current property into an investment.

    Aside from the recent interest in moneysaving I have a four year old son, run my own company, play and teach the violin and piano whilst studying for my own interest. Oh and don't mention the cars.

    Those familiar with my debt-free diary will know I'm not exactly great at record keeping but am trying to improve, so please don't expect the detailed financial updates others seem to put on here. To kick things off, I suppose I ought to confess the mortgage debt is a total of circa £185,000 and I have no real timescale or plan in mind to pay it off.

    Sorry if this is not a particularly articulate introduction, as I seem to be at a loss how to tailor it to both those who've read my debt free diary and to new readers frequenting mortgage free.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
Page 164
    • maman
    • By maman 11th Sep 17, 10:59 AM
    • 17,002 Posts
    • 101,653 Thanks
    maman
    Yes, I've been introduced to the teaching standards. I knew about them before and have no problem working towards them. However, I don't feel I'm being supported in working towards those at the moment.
    Originally posted by AlexLK

    This is the case with a lot of vocational/professional qualifications.

    What you get out of it is that you get some experience behind you (and not all experience has to be wholly positive to be valuable, sometimes seeing things done in a way you don't want to emulate is just as beneficial as being inspired) and at the end you get the piece of paper that enables you to do the job you love, in the way that you want to do it.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel

    That's a very good point RS. However, I would say that, although it's very early days to judge yet, Alex must get the support he needs. We have a crazy system where there's only one bite of the cherry for QTS so you have to make it work term by term in that first year. Wearing my HR related hat, it's terribly important to flag up any issues with providers so they can be sorted before each term's assessments.

    Unfortunately, I'm really struggling to connect with the fundamental ethos of the school, the staff within it (on a personal or professional level) and the ways of doing things. I can say I would not take a job at the school because it's not the environment for me. However, in a different environment with different management, maybe it would be fine. Legally, I am not an employee now but whilst there's no renumeration, we are treated as employees. Can't say I like the idea of effectively giving us all the pitfalls with none of the benefits. Not to mention I feel the powers that be are effectively trying to send us on a guilt trip over how much work we put in. I've made the decision I put in what I can but not to the detriment of my family or my own wellbeing as I'm not going to be going down that path again.
    Originally posted by AlexLK

    That's the ethos of many, if not most, schools currently. It's probably the main reason for the retention crisis in the profession. Teachers generally cite workload above the relatively poor salaries and unruly pupils. Unfortunately it's often exacerbated in schools that offer training on the job as they see themselves as 'outstanding' and have achieved that through working 24/7.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 16th Sep 17, 12:11 PM
    • 1,900 Posts
    • 5,239 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    Hope you're getting on ok Alex.
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 16th Sep 17, 10:46 PM
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    • 30,231 Thanks
    AlexLK
    Only just managing to write a quick update. I think I need to get back to checking in here and completing my targets.

    Not really sure what my future holds at the moment re. work / study. Very tired this weekend and have spent hardly any time with my son over this week. I realise I could spend a lot more time with him if I were to get more involved with developing the property business and dealing in antiques than I would if I were teaching full time. I didn't think effectively paying to work would concern me as much as it is but the hardest thing is being made to feel guilty for wanting to spend time with my family. Mrs. K. has been wonderful this past week, so has my cousin and even my parents have. My wife thinks it's not a nice industry to work in and I'm starting to wonder if she's right.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • kelpie35
    • By kelpie35 17th Sep 17, 12:15 AM
    • 1,522 Posts
    • 4,836 Thanks
    kelpie35
    Sorry to hear you are having doubts about your new career move.

    It is very difficult to work full time and care for your family in the manner you were used to.

    Only you know what is best for your future.

    I do hope you find time to enjoy family time with what is left of the weekend.

    Take care.
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 17th Sep 17, 11:12 AM
    • 28,070 Posts
    • 154,326 Thanks
    Karmacat
    It's a very tough industry these days, and no mistake

    I hesitate to say this, but you don't have to work in it for the rest of your life, even if you get your qualification. There's full time paid work, part time too, whether state or private, and there's also private tuition, which has a decent rate of pay per hour, and fits really well into the life of someone who has other streams of income going on as well.

    Just something to think about.

    Take care, Alex.
    Retired August 2016
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 17th Sep 17, 12:36 PM
    • 1,559 Posts
    • 17,924 Thanks
    Suffolk lass
    My husband undertook teacher training as a graduate in his mid forties. He found the "wisdom" regarding research that had not been revisited for close to fifty years, with more and more theories layered on top, combined with a need to blindly accept that this was how it must be done, very frustrating. He bit his tongue, put his head down and got through it. He loves teaching, despite the downsides and has no regrets, but he wanted to quit at several points.

    So don't feel you are alone Alex. My husband did not have a plan B so he stuck with it, but it called his very desire to teach into question. I feel for you. It is a dilemma.
    Last edited by Suffolk lass; 28-09-2017 at 6:09 PM. Reason: typos
    MFiT T4 #2 update 42.67% after Q7 £5,465 behind where I should be
    Save £12k in 2017 #64 - £9,260.94 saved (84.19%) after October - my annual target is £11,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2017 budget of £3,600 £3000 (reduced from Apr) - 78.56% including stores after October
    My DFD is http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5593594
    • maman
    • By maman 17th Sep 17, 5:37 PM
    • 17,002 Posts
    • 101,653 Thanks
    maman
    My husband undertook teacher training as a graduate in his mid forties. He found the "wisdom" regarding research that had not been revisited for close to fifty years, with more and more theories layered on top, combined with a need to blindly accept that this was how it must be done, very frustrating. He bit his tongue, put his head down and got through it. He loves teaching, despite the downsides and has not regrets, but he wanted to quit at several points.

    So don't feel you are alone Alex. My husband did not have a plan B so he stuck with it, but it called his very desire to teach into question. I fell for you. It is a dilemma.
    Originally posted by Suffolk lass
    It is a dilemma. It's sad that being used as a political football by successive governments has had such an adverse effect. Alex is just what the profession needs: a teacher who thinks! Too many these days just follow, not helped by teaching to the tests. Unfortunately it's necessary to work with the system to get the piece of paper.
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 17th Sep 17, 10:26 PM
    • 5,823 Posts
    • 30,231 Thanks
    AlexLK
    Sorry to hear you are having doubts about your new career move.

    It is very difficult to work full time and care for your family in the manner you were used to.

    Only you know what is best for your future.

    I do hope you find time to enjoy family time with what is left of the weekend.

    Take care.
    Originally posted by kelpie35
    Thank you, kelpie.

    We've had a good, if quiet weekend. I'm starting to see the potential in things I had somewhat dismissed beforehand. Finding being "employed" (well, sort of) very difficult and am throwing myself into the potential property project during my (few) spare hours. My wife is spending more time on it than I and seems to have found herself in my parents' good book.

    It's a very tough industry these days, and no mistake

    I hesitate to say this, but you don't have to work in it for the rest of your life, even if you get your qualification. There's full time paid work, part time too, whether state or private, and there's also private tuition, which has a decent rate of pay per hour, and fits really well into the life of someone who has other streams of income going on as well.

    Just something to think about.

    Take care, Alex.
    Originally posted by Karmacat
    Thank you, karmacat.

    I am seeing a different side to it now I am a part of it, rather than a volunteer or someone who teaches pupils how to play the violin (seen as being non-essential, I suppose). I think some of the problem is having other commitments, both familial and business.

    My husband undertook teacher training as a graduate in his mid forties. He found the "wisdom" regarding research that had not been revisited for close to fifty years, with more and more theories layered on top, combined with a need to blindly accept that this was how it must be done, very frustrating. He bit his tongue, put his head down and got through it. He loves teaching, despite the downsides and has not regrets, but he wanted to quit at several points.

    So don't feel you are alone Alex. My husband did not have a plan B so he stuck with it, but it called his very desire to teach into question. I fell for you. It is a dilemma.
    Originally posted by Suffolk lass
    It doesn't seem things are much different now, SL. There seems A LOT of mindless, repetitive paperwork and tasks which seem to be little about educating pupils. From what I've seen it doesn't seem to change all that much post qualification, either. That doesn't concern me so much as the blame and guilt placed upon us. There seems an expectation of us to give an awful lot of time at the expense of our own families / other commitments which I am not willing to give. I care about giving my pupils an education but not at the expense of my wellbeing.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 17th Sep 17, 10:29 PM
    • 5,823 Posts
    • 30,231 Thanks
    AlexLK
    It is a dilemma. It's sad that being used as a political football by successive governments has had such an adverse effect. Alex is just what the profession needs: a teacher who thinks! Too many these days just follow, not helped by teaching to the tests. Unfortunately it's necessary to work with the system to get the piece of paper.
    Originally posted by maman
    What the government wants seems to play a vast role which I hadn't quite anticipated. I suppose that was not helped by my own background. A lot do seem to follow and to be honest I have come across ones that do not seem to be articulated or educated professionals.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 17th Sep 17, 10:33 PM
    • 5,823 Posts
    • 30,231 Thanks
    AlexLK
    Start as I mean to go on with ... Organise end of month treat ... Going to speak to Mrs. K. about this tomorrow evening.
    Overpayment: Make one even if it is only £50. On track to make a £100 overpayment.
    Food budget: £300 / £400.
    Meat free days: 5 / 10.
    No work weekends: 2 / 3.
    15 minutes piano practise each morning: 20 / 33.
    At least 10,000 steps per day: 11,000 today.
    10 minutes exercise (not inc. walking): 2 / 34. Completely forgot about this target. Should update more.
    A/F school nights: This has been much better over this week, not even had wine with our evening meals.
    but most importantly ... Get through the month!
    Last edited by AlexLK; 24-09-2017 at 11:02 PM.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 18th Sep 17, 8:30 AM
    • 28,070 Posts
    • 154,326 Thanks
    Karmacat
    There seems an expectation of us to give an awful lot of time at the expense of our own families / other commitments which I am not willing to give. I care about giving my pupils an education but not at the expense of my wellbeing.
    Originally posted by AlexLK
    Thats absolutely the thing to keep in mind as you go forward.

    Save
    Retired August 2016
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 18th Sep 17, 11:54 AM
    • 1,900 Posts
    • 5,239 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    It's a very tough industry these days, and no mistake

    I hesitate to say this, but you don't have to work in it for the rest of your life, even if you get your qualification. There's full time paid work, part time too, whether state or private, and there's also private tuition, which has a decent rate of pay per hour, and fits really well into the life of someone who has other streams of income going on as well.

    Just something to think about.

    Take care, Alex.
    Originally posted by Karmacat

    This is very true. If you get through the training and get your qualified teacher status, there will be other doors open besides full time school positions.

    A very good friend of mine was ambitious when she started her teaching career, was head of department within 5 years, but was getting burned out and exhausted.

    Then she dropped to two days a week after having her first child, and she's never looked back. Two days allows her to get back to basics and just enjoy teaching while also having plenty of time with her young family.

    I do hope you can get some decent rest soon and start to feel more on top of things, and I am delighted to hear that your wife and your cousin are supporting you and coming through for you.
    • heartbreak_star
    • By heartbreak_star 19th Sep 17, 2:50 PM
    • 7,611 Posts
    • 16,788 Thanks
    heartbreak_star
    Alex, may I pick your brains regarding a musical issue? It's a bit silly but you might be able to help...

    HBS x
    I believe in ordinary acts of bravery, in the courage that drives one person to stand up for another.

    #JC4PM
    • SingleSue
    • By SingleSue 19th Sep 17, 4:32 PM
    • 9,944 Posts
    • 55,731 Thanks
    SingleSue


    That's the ethos of many, if not most, schools currently. It's probably the main reason for the retention crisis in the profession. Teachers generally cite workload above the relatively poor salaries and unruly pupils. Unfortunately it's often exacerbated in schools that offer training on the job as they see themselves as 'outstanding' and have achieved that through working 24/7.
    Originally posted by maman
    It's the stories from current teachers that put my eldest son off from going into it finally. All through university he had plans to be a teacher, had even tentatively organised a placement for this September but the horror stories made him think again.

    He's starting a graduate office job in a few weeks although he has promised to look into teaching again in a year or so time when he is more financially sorted and has more life experience.
    Keep battling on, I will get there eventually..even if I don't know where there is! Eldests' diagnosis (4.5.10) is Ehlers Danlos Hypermobility type and now it looks like I have it too (13.1.11) eekk!
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 24th Sep 17, 11:01 PM
    • 5,823 Posts
    • 30,231 Thanks
    AlexLK
    Thats absolutely the thing to keep in mind as you go forward.

    Save
    Originally posted by Karmacat
    Thanks, Karmacat.

    This is very true. If you get through the training and get your qualified teacher status, there will be other doors open besides full time school positions.

    A very good friend of mine was ambitious when she started her teaching career, was head of department within 5 years, but was getting burned out and exhausted.

    Then she dropped to two days a week after having her first child, and she's never looked back. Two days allows her to get back to basics and just enjoy teaching while also having plenty of time with her young family.

    I do hope you can get some decent rest soon and start to feel more on top of things, and I am delighted to hear that your wife and your cousin are supporting you and coming through for you.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Thanks, Red Squirrel.

    Alex, may I pick your brains regarding a musical issue? It's a bit silly but you might be able to help...

    HBS x
    Originally posted by heartbreak_star
    Of course.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 24th Sep 17, 11:01 PM
    • 5,823 Posts
    • 30,231 Thanks
    AlexLK
    It's the stories from current teachers that put my eldest son off from going into it finally. All through university he had plans to be a teacher, had even tentatively organised a placement for this September but the horror stories made him think again.

    He's starting a graduate office job in a few weeks although he has promised to look into teaching again in a year or so time when he is more financially sorted and has more life experience.
    Originally posted by SingleSue
    I hope it works out for him, Single Sue.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 24th Sep 17, 11:04 PM
    • 5,823 Posts
    • 30,231 Thanks
    AlexLK
    Going to admit to not keeping up with this and the spending getting out of control. On the plus side, my business interests seem to be working really well (typical! ) and I'm surprised how much I'm enjoying working with my wife on the property project. Learning lots.

    Start as I mean to go on with ... Organise end of month treat ...
    Overpayment: Make one even if it is only £50.
    Food budget: Dread to think.
    Meat free days: 7/10.
    No work weekends: 3 / 3.
    15 minutes piano practise each morning: Most days.
    At least 10,000 steps per day: 18,000 today.
    10 minutes exercise (not inc. walking):
    A/F school nights:
    but most importantly ... Get through the month!
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • Watty1
    • By Watty1 25th Sep 17, 10:06 AM
    • 2,863 Posts
    • 19,892 Thanks
    Watty1
    I know how easy it is for the spending controls to unravel Alex...just saying
    Mortgage at start of diary Sept 2013: £132,995 Aug 2015 £0
    Overpaying next mortgage. £79,491 now £27152
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 25th Sep 17, 10:01 PM
    • 5,823 Posts
    • 30,231 Thanks
    AlexLK
    I know how easy it is for the spending controls to unravel Alex...just saying
    Originally posted by Watty1
    Thanks, Watty. I know I’m outnumbered on here but I struggle not to buy things on most days, to be honest. Only dared to have a look at next months CC bill and it’s not good. Won’t be getting into any debt as it’ll be paid in full but I’ve started buying things without thinking again.

    Apart from the property and antiques business I’m not doing very well. Even my son was really annoying me tonight. Dreading Mrs K being away later on in the week. Seem to be finding people in general annoying, to be honest. Really cannot get on with anyone at the moment apart from Mrs. K. strangely.
    Last edited by AlexLK; 25-09-2017 at 10:06 PM.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 26th Sep 17, 9:03 AM
    • 28,070 Posts
    • 154,326 Thanks
    Karmacat
    I know Iím outnumbered on here but I struggle not to buy things on most days, to be honest.
    Originally posted by AlexLK
    Then thats one of the reasons that you're here! Good for you for saying it.

    Only dared to have a look at next months CC bill and itís not good. Wonít be getting into any debt as itíll be paid in full but Iíve started buying things without thinking again.
    And you've become conscious of it after only a month. We all fall back on old behaviours during stressful times. And doing a teaching course is a stressful time. Yes. It is!

    Apart from the property and antiques business Iím not doing very well. Even my son was really annoying me tonight. Dreading Mrs K being away later on in the week. Seem to be finding people in general annoying, to be honest. Really cannot get on with anyone at the moment apart from Mrs. K. strangely.
    See above. Its a stressful time! So use the adrenaline of stress to do jumping jacks or do an exercise video off youtube or something. With your son, maybe

    And how lovely is it that even during this stressful time, Mrs K is the one person not annoying you

    You're doing great
    Save
    Retired August 2016
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