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  • FIRST POST
    • dranzer01
    • By dranzer01 10th Aug 14, 2:47 PM
    • 171Posts
    • 32Thanks
    dranzer01
    Who Has Done Their CII/DIP CII/ACII?
    • #1
    • 10th Aug 14, 2:47 PM
    Who Has Done Their CII/DIP CII/ACII? 10th Aug 14 at 2:47 PM
    Looking to start this soon and was wondering who here has taken these qualifications? How were they? Are the CII multiple choice?
Page 3
    • CaseyN
    • By CaseyN 25th Feb 16, 4:48 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    CaseyN
    I am doing the Dip CII & ACII currently, I found the law module (PO5) difficult and I would say it is only for the committed as coming home every evening and studying is not fun.
    Originally posted by smifffy1989
    PO5 was horrid. It was one of the compulsory units for my underwriting diploma. I can honestly say, of the ten CII exams I've done that was by far the most tedious.
    Originally posted by starrystarry
    Hi guys, looking for some expert advice;

    I'm working in Germany in a non-underwriting-role for a UK insurance company. My company places great value on CII qualifications (probably because the UK is the home and main market) and fully pays for the exams. So far I've done LM1&2, P92 and P86. Key motivation has been that even though I'm not an underwriter (and don't have a desire to become one) I do see the general value in thoroughly understanding what the business is about.

    Current CII situation: I'm two exams away from a Dip CII qualification, one of which would have to be the mandatory P05 hurdle. Apart from reading it's quite difficult, it also seems this exam -even more so than any other- is extremely UK focused, and I'm really in doubt if it's worth the effort. P86 ('Personal insurances') already gave me great doubts what the hell I was spending my time on.

    Do you feel P05 is of any use to a person working in the non-UK insurance business? (If I'd decide to not do P05 I'd essentially be deciding to completely quit the CII program --given that P05 is mandatory)

    Any and all thoughts and advice would be greatly appreciated..
    Last edited by CaseyN; 25-02-2016 at 4:53 PM.
    • rs65
    • By rs65 25th Feb 16, 5:45 PM
    • 4,914 Posts
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    rs65
    As you say, it is mandatory so it's your choice.

    Maybe not easy but plenty of people pass it.

    Have you looked at M05 ?
    • CaseyN
    • By CaseyN 25th Feb 16, 7:22 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    CaseyN
    As you say, it is mandatory so it's your choice.

    Maybe not easy but plenty of people pass it.

    Have you looked at M05 ?
    Originally posted by rs65
    Hi rs65

    Many thanks for the swift response, but it seems my question hasn't been clear enough.

    There's no doubt in my mind that P05/M05 is useful to insurance people in the UK. (CII is a renowned institute and surely they made this course mandatory not without reason)

    I'm only wondering how useful you guys consider the content of P05/M05 to someone working in insurance outside the UK.

    If P05/M05 covers a fair amount of general, international and/or non-UK law topics then I would imagine it's still fairly useful to people outside the UK as well. However if it only covers very UK-specific business law, then I guess I should consider this course not very useful to me. I am not afraid of difficult exams and/or hard work, but do only want to spend time on studying stuff that's useful (to me)

    Looking forward to your further thoughts.
    Thanks
    • rs65
    • By rs65 25th Feb 16, 7:31 PM
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    rs65
    I'm only wondering how useful you guys consider the content of P05/M05 to someone working in insurance outside the UK.
    Originally posted by CaseyN
    As useful as any other CII exam in isolation.


    The point is if you want to achieve Dip or above then you have to do it.
    • CaseyN
    • By CaseyN 25th Feb 16, 8:32 PM
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    CaseyN
    As useful as any other CII exam in isolation.
    Originally posted by rs65
    My whole point is that the usefulness of the CII exams seems to differ quite a bit, especially to people outside the UK.

    Examples:
    - "P92 - Insurance Business and Finance" seems useful to anyone working in insurance, independent of whether that's inside or outside the UK, because mathematical logic, finance, insurance profitability ratios etc., are all the same all over the world anyway.
    - Contrary, "P86 - Personal insurances" is so UK-specific that -I personally felt/feel- it is quite a waste of time for anyone not living in the UK and/or working in UK insurance.
    - "LM1 and LM2" are probably only truly useful if you happen to interact with the London Market at least every once in a while.

    The point is if you want to achieve Dip or above then you have to do it.
    Originally posted by rs65
    Yes I understand, but please ignore this point. I guess I haven't been clear enough about this before, but I am not taking these exams because I must obtain a certain CII level. My sole motivation is expanding my understanding of insurance in general (I have no desire to only expand my knowledge in UK-specific insurance).

    I was just hoping to get some advice from you guys and girls that have already taken the P05/M05 exam, on whether you feel it's worth it for me (as a non-UK resident) to spend time it.
    Last edited by CaseyN; 25-02-2016 at 8:37 PM.
    • rs65
    • By rs65 25th Feb 16, 8:42 PM
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    rs65
    I was just hoping to get some advice from you guys and girls that have already taken the P05/M05 exam, on whether you feel it's worth it for me (as a non-UK resident) to spend time it.
    Originally posted by CaseyN
    What is your non underwriting role?


    Do you have any involvement in contracts or insurance governed by English law?


    I would recommend it, but you are best placed to decide if its relevant or worth it to you.
    • CaseyN
    • By CaseyN 25th Feb 16, 8:48 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    CaseyN
    What is your non underwriting role?

    Do you have any involvement in contracts or insurance governed by English law?

    I would recommend it, but you are best placed to decide if its relevant or worth it to you.
    Originally posted by rs65
    Quite broad; Operations + IT
    No involvement in English law contracts..

    On the one hand I am really motivated to keep doing these CII exams and progress my overall CII qualification, yet on the other hand I'm not motivated at all to do any further exams like P86 that aren't useful at all to me apart from the CII credits they bring. Especially if it concerns an exam that experienced users on online forum refer to as 'horrid'..
    • rs65
    • By rs65 25th Feb 16, 8:53 PM
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    rs65
    In operations and IT, I would think the most useful part would be the overall qualification at whatever level. If you want to grow in areas such as business, finance, economics then there are more useful exams than CII ones.


    Most people describing it as horrid will be referring to P05 rather than M05.
    • starrystarry
    • By starrystarry 25th Feb 16, 11:22 PM
    • 2,351 Posts
    • 5,091 Thanks
    starrystarry
    Hi CaseyN,

    I'd say that P05 would be of little use to someone who doesn't need to know about UK law. I think it is a useful qualification to anyone working in UK insurance/finance as it gives you a good broad understanding but if your work doesn't involve any contracts that are governed by UK law I don't think it would be much use. On the other hand, if English law has influenced the law of the country you work in, it could be of some use.

    It's hard work that exam, not for the faint hearted, so I wouldn't have chosen to do it if it hadn't been a compulsory unit for the qualification I was working towards. If you need it to get your Dip CII, you might just have to bite the bullet and get on with it. Some parts are interesting but there's a lot of cases, dates etc you have to memorise.
    • bouncydog1
    • By bouncydog1 26th Feb 16, 6:26 AM
    • 2,593 Posts
    • 2,038 Thanks
    bouncydog1
    Two exams away from the qualification is an excellent achievement. I would say persevere as once you have it, it's done. You do of course have to continue with keeping up CPD but working in industry that's not difficult. You might not stay in Germany for ever so it will be useful if you decide to move. To employers it's confirmation of knowledge!
    • CaseyN
    • By CaseyN 26th Feb 16, 3:53 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    CaseyN
    Two exams away from the qualification is an excellent achievement. I would say persevere as once you have it, it's done. You do of course have to continue with keeping up CPD but working in industry that's not difficult. You might not stay in Germany for ever so it will be useful if you decide to move. To employers it's confirmation of knowledge!
    Originally posted by bouncydog1
    Thanks for your thoughts bouncydog1

    I actually thought I had come to my final decision yesterday to stop pursuing a CII qualification, but after reading your response and the syllabus I feel I at least should give it a shot. Moreover there seem quite some non-very-UK-specific CII exams out there I could pursue after P05/M05.

    What version of the exam would you guys recommend? P05 or M05?
    Last edited by CaseyN; 26-02-2016 at 7:48 PM.
    • rs65
    • By rs65 26th Feb 16, 6:47 PM
    • 4,914 Posts
    • 2,313 Thanks
    rs65
    What version of the exam would you guys recommend? P05 or M05?
    Originally posted by CaseyN
    That's really a personal thing I suppose. If you like essays/exams then P05. If you like assessments and multiple choice then M05.


    The M's were started as a trial and have been retained so I guess they are popular
    • OG1862
    • By OG1862 14th Oct 16, 2:48 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    OG1862
    Proactive approach to CII
    Hi,


    Personally the best way to complete the CII qualifications is the proactive way and is the way I'm doing mine:


    1) Do the compulary IF1 unit of the certificate to get your first 15 credits - personally I don't see any point in doing anything lower han this as they only give you 6 credits and for the time you spend studying its not worth it.
    2) So once you've done IF1 jump straight on to the compulsory units of the Diploma (M92 and M05) each one gives you 25 credits so once you've completed your first one you're up to 40 credits, that gives you your certificate in insurance.
    3) Once you've completed both compulsory units you're up to 65 credits (inc IF1's 15) so now you've only got to get another 55 credits in the diploma.
    4) If you're going to stop at the diploma then you can do two units at diploma level - making sure you choose one unit giving 30 credits and a second giving 25 or above.
    Alternatively instead of doing the final 2 optional units of the diploma then go on to do one of your three compulsory units of the advanced diploma which give 30 credits each.


    CII isn't cheap and it's time consuming so if you can avoid taking unnecessary units then do! credits are accumulated through the different levels of the CII so don't get tricked into completing every single unit of each level when you don't have to.


    I'm onto my diploma now and am qualified to certificate level having done as I set out above. IF1 took me 6 months - it can be done in much less if you can set the time aside and the Diploma takes around 2 years. If you do every unit (3 for Cert CII and 5 for Dip CII) its going to take at least an extra year and will cost you hundreds more along the way.


    Hope this helps
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