Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Amy
    • By MSE Amy 15th Apr 14, 6:25 PM
    • 27Posts
    • 36Thanks
    MSE Amy
    Stocks & Shares ISAs
    • #1
    • 15th Apr 14, 6:25 PM
    Stocks & Shares ISAs 15th Apr 14 at 6:25 PM
    Hi!

    This is the discussion thread for the


    Click reply below to discuss. If you haven’t already, join the forum to reply. If you aren’t sure how it all works, read our New to Forum? Intro Guide.
Page 21
    • SIRUSKEY
    • By SIRUSKEY 21st Jul 17, 9:25 AM
    • 58 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    SIRUSKEY
    Where is the best place for honest reviews of funds that's not in the pocket of the manager/firm.

    I'm reviewing my current holdings and finding that some on the Charles Stanley foundation list are an absolutely no no, on fundexpert.

    Is there a good impartial starting point?
    • eskbanker
    • By eskbanker 21st Jul 17, 11:54 AM
    • 5,561 Posts
    • 5,402 Thanks
    eskbanker
    What do you mean by 'honest reviews'?

    There are any number of sites that publish comparative factual information about actual performance but over and above that there are a range of subjective analyses so, for example, FundExpert's Dynamic Fund Selection methodology is based specifically on the principles of momentum investing: http://www.fundexpert.co.uk/research/dynamicfundselection.htm

    Since FundExpert also sell funds then I'd question their impartiality as a matter of principle (but not necessarily dismissing their analysis) so if I was looking for impartiality I'd go to somewhere independent that offers data without having any vested interests, such as TrustNet or MorningStar.
    • SIRUSKEY
    • By SIRUSKEY 21st Jul 17, 12:59 PM
    • 58 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    SIRUSKEY
    Thanks. The question was more of impartial review of funds from people who don't benefit from your purchase.
    • dunstonh
    • By dunstonh 21st Jul 17, 1:06 PM
    • 89,842 Posts
    • 55,435 Thanks
    dunstonh
    Thanks. The question was more of impartial review of funds from people who don't benefit from your purchase.
    Originally posted by SIRUSKEY
    Anything provided free of charge is going to be doing it for a reason. A reason that is unlikely to be doing it out of love. This is why independent research sites charge you for access. If the end user is paying, there is no need for any bias.

    Worst places are platforms/providers. Most do not promote funds but some on the DIY side do. Typically those that make super clean share classes available through them.
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). Comments are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice. Different people have different needs and what is right for one person may not be for another. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from a Financial Adviser local to you.
    • eskbanker
    • By eskbanker 21st Jul 17, 1:28 PM
    • 5,561 Posts
    • 5,402 Thanks
    eskbanker
    Thanks. The question was more of impartial review of funds from people who don't benefit from your purchase.
    Originally posted by SIRUSKEY
    My question was more about the word 'review' than the word 'honest' - I get that you're looking for independence, neutrality, etc, but researching and selecting funds shouldn't be treated like reading about hotels on TripAdvisor, it should be based more on fundamentals and facts rather than opinions - well, that's my opinion anyway!
    • SIRUSKEY
    • By SIRUSKEY 21st Jul 17, 1:32 PM
    • 58 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    SIRUSKEY
    Good point,

    I would be interested in view points for growth funds over the next 20 years for regular monthly saving.

    I'm looking at emerging market funds but I'm out of my depth.
    • dunstonh
    • By dunstonh 21st Jul 17, 1:56 PM
    • 89,842 Posts
    • 55,435 Thanks
    dunstonh
    Good point,

    I would be interested in view points for growth funds over the next 20 years for regular monthly saving.

    I'm looking at emerging market funds but I'm out of my depth.
    Originally posted by SIRUSKEY
    Why are you looking at just one sector and not all the other sectors?

    Single sector investing is bad investing.
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). Comments are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice. Different people have different needs and what is right for one person may not be for another. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from a Financial Adviser local to you.
    • SIRUSKEY
    • By SIRUSKEY 21st Jul 17, 2:24 PM
    • 58 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    SIRUSKEY
    I'm not. I have funds in US and UK but the more I have been reading the more I realise I have lots of overlap. I have nothing for EU or emerging markets.
    • Linton
    • By Linton 21st Jul 17, 2:41 PM
    • 8,320 Posts
    • 8,217 Thanks
    Linton
    I find the best place for fund data and generating comparison graphs is Trustnet. It also provides convenient links to the fund manager's documentation. As has been said it doesnt make sense to "review" a fund like a film or a play. Data is all that matters.
    • SIRUSKEY
    • By SIRUSKEY 21st Jul 17, 2:46 PM
    • 58 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    SIRUSKEY
    I find the best place for fund data and generating comparison graphs is Trustnet. It also provides convenient links to the fund manager's documentation. As has been said it doesnt make sense to "review" a fund like a film or a play. Data is all that matters.
    Originally posted by Linton


    Yes it was a poor choice of words. It's data and comparisons I was looking for.
    • dunstonh
    • By dunstonh 21st Jul 17, 2:53 PM
    • 89,842 Posts
    • 55,435 Thanks
    dunstonh
    Yes it was a poor choice of words. It's data and comparisons I was looking for.
    Originally posted by SIRUSKEY
    Do also take some of the data analysis on sites like trustnet and Morningstar with a pinch of salt. Funds pay to have their data included on those sites. The more they pay, the more the analysis.

    Some very good funds pay little or nothing and may look less attractive than poorer quality funds with lots of stars.
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). Comments are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice. Different people have different needs and what is right for one person may not be for another. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from a Financial Adviser local to you.
    • SIRUSKEY
    • By SIRUSKEY 21st Jul 17, 3:14 PM
    • 58 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    SIRUSKEY
    Do also take some of the data analysis on sites like trustnet and Morningstar with a pinch of salt. Funds pay to have their data included on those sites. The more they pay, the more the analysis.

    Some very good funds pay little or nothing and may look less attractive than poorer quality funds with lots of stars.
    Originally posted by dunstonh

    Are there any funds or managers that would be a good research topic?
    • Jimmyc
    • By Jimmyc 24th Jul 17, 6:58 AM
    • 141 Posts
    • 34 Thanks
    Jimmyc
    I'm looking to open a stocks and shares isa with legal and general and invest monthly. I doesn't mention anywhere on the webpage if you can pause the monthly investments. Reason for the concern is I'm moving next year and may need the extra funds temporarily.

    Thanks
    • le loup
    • By le loup 24th Jul 17, 8:52 AM
    • 3,583 Posts
    • 3,420 Thanks
    le loup
    You need to read the full T&Cs and not rely on a web page.
    Alternatively, you could ask them.
    • john46jac46
    • By john46jac46 6th Oct 17, 1:59 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    john46jac46
    Low cost Stocks & Shares ISA platforms
    Maybe I missed it on your ratings list, but the iWEB SSISA seems to me to be by far the best and cheapest "no frills" platform.
    There's a £25 fee to open an account, Zero, yes £0, annual charge, and only £5 per trade for buying or selling, irrespective of how few or many trades per year.
    I am mostly invested in shares, with a few funds, so probably braver than many, but it's great for me.

    You show the Halifax platform, which is also part of Lloyds Banking Group, but to me it's just a more expensive version of iWEB

    Or am I missing an important downside ?
    • eskbanker
    • By eskbanker 6th Oct 17, 4:13 PM
    • 5,561 Posts
    • 5,402 Thanks
    eskbanker
    Maybe I missed it on your ratings list, but the iWEB SSISA seems to me to be by far the best and cheapest "no frills" platform.
    There's a £25 fee to open an account, Zero, yes £0, annual charge, and only £5 per trade for buying or selling, irrespective of how few or many trades per year.
    I am mostly invested in shares, with a few funds, so probably braver than many, but it's great for me.

    You show the Halifax platform, which is also part of Lloyds Banking Group, but to me it's just a more expensive version of iWEB

    Or am I missing an important downside ?
    Originally posted by john46jac46
    The trouble is that there are too many variables involved to allow a simplistic one-size-fits-all ranking of providers, so anyone looking to identify the lowest-cost option for their own specific choice of shares, funds, investment pattern, size of holding, etc, should use more granular analyses at the likes of:
    http://monevator.com/compare-uk-cheapest-online-brokers/
    http://www.comparefundplatforms.com/
    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5583030

    Having said that, I do agree that there's a strong case for including iWeb in that article and use them myself....
    • Brand
    • By Brand 9th Oct 17, 11:46 AM
    • 77 Posts
    • 21 Thanks
    Brand
    I use iWeb and x-o which look to be the cheapest execution-only stockbroker-type S&S ISAs and I opened them in different financial years. For convenience I put shares in x-o and ETFs in iWeb.
    With UK shares (including investment trusts) you pay stamp duty upon purchase. With ETFs you don't.
    x-o are very good on handling the extra correspondence which occasionally comes with shares. (I can't speak for iWeb)
    iWeb can hold OEIC type of funds, and occasionally you may wish to hold one of these (e.g. because you think the fundmanager is very good) You'd pay £5 to buy and sell as normal, but, as iWeb is not really tuned up to handle OEIC type of funds, it is not easy to determine on iWeb exactly what the fund managers initial charge and annual costs will be, as it may (or, more likely, may not) have done a deal with the OEIC fund manager.
    The simplest thing is to open an extra separate S&S ISA with a fundsupermarket type of S&S ISA. (and to do this either by a transfer of old money, or with new money in a new financial year from that of your last S&S ISA.
    Last edited by Brand; 09-10-2017 at 11:49 AM.
    • Alexland
    • By Alexland 9th Oct 17, 12:33 PM
    • 428 Posts
    • 255 Thanks
    Alexland
    I am with Halifax and accept it costs a tiny bit more in fees but the way I use the account it's very cheap anyway. In some ways I like that the trade costs are high as it stops me fiddling with a core portion of my portfolio. As I have above the FSCS limit in some accounts I prefer to be with companies that are well known enough there would be some political upset if they went belly up and customer assets disappeared without a trace.

    If x-o went bust and the assets were fraudulently snaffled away would the media be upset?
    Last edited by Alexland; 09-10-2017 at 12:38 PM.
    • Audaxer
    • By Audaxer 10th Oct 17, 9:52 PM
    • 477 Posts
    • 201 Thanks
    Audaxer
    I am with Halifax and accept it costs a tiny bit more in fees but the way I use the account it's very cheap anyway. In some ways I like that the trade costs are high as it stops me fiddling with a core portion of my portfolio. As I have above the FSCS limit in some accounts I prefer to be with companies that are well known enough there would be some political upset if they went belly up and customer assets disappeared without a trace.

    If x-o went bust and the assets were fraudulently snaffled away would the media be upset?
    Originally posted by Alexland
    I agree in that I feel a bit more security in using a platform from a big name bank or broker than some of the smaller platforms that are not that well known.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,460Posts Today

7,810Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • Common question, but actually its pretty meaningless - the amount to govt is arbitrary - i explain why here...? https://t.co/W6NFlmztaV

  • RT @avantiproperty: @MartinSLewis You've got too much time on your hands.

  • Today's Twitter poll: Bit out of no where this one. If you wear a watch which wrist is it on...

  • Follow Martin