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  • FIRST POST
    Laura_88
    Best eco/heat logs?
    • #1
    • 13th Oct 13, 11:49 PM
    Best eco/heat logs? 13th Oct 13 at 11:49 PM
    Finally got our wonderful stove fittered last week! Got a store full of logs but wanting to keep it stocked up, especially with snow due in a months time! We was looking at eco/heat logs whatever they are called. Got some from home bargains which where good but I doubt they will be around for long.

    Also best places to buy them from? Can't buy in bulk yet, so wanting to try & test some. Is eBay cheap-ish? Saw some 'hotties' on there.


    Thanks
Page 1
    • Greenfires
    • By Greenfires 14th Oct 13, 8:29 AM
    • 622 Posts
    • 532 Thanks
    Greenfires
    • #2
    • 14th Oct 13, 8:29 AM
    • #2
    • 14th Oct 13, 8:29 AM
    Please - if you're buying woodfuel - don't buy a handful of packs if you can possibly avoid it. This applies to packs of briquettes, nets of logs, you name it. They will always cost a load more per pack than buying in bulk. Briquettes do look like a lot of money on paper - but nearly all our customers round here will get through the whole winter with a single pallet, and most will have enough left to see them through until I see them again around this time next year.

    We've been dealing in (and using) briquettes for many years now, and after trialling some cheaper ones a couple of years back, we took the decision to only stock the ones we considered the best. All our regulars tried the cheaper ones and no-one bought them again - they all reckoned the "expensive" ones lasted so much longer they actually worked out cheaper to use than the cheap ones - and this tied up with the results we'd got ourselves in our own stoves at home.

    Hotties are the brand we sell - we reckon they're about the best of the bunch, and if we found a better one we'd be selling that instead. We have quite a few customers who are members on here. Drop us a line if you need more info and I'll be happy to help!

    Just to add - we sell at exactly the same price as you'd get direct from the factory gate - nothing added on!
    Last edited by Greenfires; 14-10-2013 at 11:53 AM.
  • Laura_88
    • #3
    • 14th Oct 13, 7:57 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Oct 13, 7:57 PM
    Thanks for the reply. We are struggling for space at the mo, didn't want to buy a load if we didn't get on with them. What is best to burn, proper logs or the eco/fuel logs? Is coal good? Been told not to use coal & logs together?
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 15th Oct 13, 1:23 AM
    • 10,296 Posts
    • 23,762 Thanks
    suki1964
    • #4
    • 15th Oct 13, 1:23 AM
    • #4
    • 15th Oct 13, 1:23 AM
    Shouldn't use coal in a stove at all. Smokeless is what you need or anthracite

    I too am of the understanding that you shouldn't burn logs and solid fuel together. However I quite often start my stove with a few logs and when they are near done but still very red, add the anthracite. And I've often put a log on the dying remains of an anthracite fire to get it going again in the morning
    • Greenfires
    • By Greenfires 15th Oct 13, 7:55 AM
    • 622 Posts
    • 532 Thanks
    Greenfires
    • #5
    • 15th Oct 13, 7:55 AM
    • #5
    • 15th Oct 13, 7:55 AM
    Suki is right - housecoal has no place in a stove - you'll make a real mess of your chimney if you don't block it completely for starters. And much as I support woodburning on ecological grounds, having a burn of smokeless now and again can help to keep a chimney cleaner.

    The reason for not burning wood and smokeless together, as far as I understand, is that moisture coming off the wood ( remember that even kiln dried logs are around 20% moisture content) can combine with the gases coming off the smokeless (smokeless can be quite corrosive as far as emissions go - that's why liners for smokeless fuel are a different grade of steel) and form acidic condensation in the chimney which will shorten it's life, whether lined or not. Bear in mind that smoke/gases in a stove chimney are moving way slower than an open fire chimney. and so have more chance to condense. Briquettes are probably less of a problem - being a fraction of the moisture of any logs at around 3 -5% but I'd probably avoid burning both at the same time for general use. Also of course, wood and smokeless fuels like different treatment. Wood likes to burn on a bed of ash with air from above and smokeless likes a clean grate with air from below - so using both together is always going to be compromising one of them.

    The logs vs briquettes debate is an old one. Briquettes always look expensive on paper, but in terms of heat they generally work out cheaper than logs. Most of our regulars (and we ourselves) will easily get through a whole winter on one pallet full - there's no way you could do that with logs. Briquettes are always completely consistent from load to load and year to year, and you always know exactly how many you're getting as we don't sell by "the trailer load" or the "dumpy bag" which could be a whole range of sizes. Buy a full pallet and you'll always get 1000 briquettes and they'll always be 3-5% moisture. Kiln dried logs are fairly reliable, but they stick a big premium on for the kiln dried label, and the majority of them still average 20% - which in a good year is more than the logs from the old boy down the road who seasons properly - but who doesn't stick the price up!

    Incidentally, if you want to try some out, I can sort you out with a sample pack if you like - they do work out a lot more expensive per pack because the carriage is pricey on small heavy consignments - but personally I'm always happier if people try them first so they know what they're getting before committing to a bulk order to get a better price. Just give us a shout if you fancy giving them a go!
  • highrisklowreturn
    • #6
    • 15th Oct 13, 9:47 AM
    • #6
    • 15th Oct 13, 9:47 AM
    How can you stand by that waffle as a chimney sweep? People have been burning housecoal in this country for years, and the idea it could block a chimney in a short time is just ludicrous. I sweep myself and have done dozens of chimneys which haven't been swept in years, which are housecoal burners, and although certainly bunked up are nowhere near blocked.

    I even burn it in a 5" clay flue which according to my neighbour was being used, right back to when it was installed in the 60s (ye old Victorian technology being superior to stainless steel and the wafflers who sell it on) which I sweep once a year. It leaves a foot squared of soot, made of wood, coal, smokeless and anything else I bung in through the year.

    As for air from above or below, many appliances, including two stoves I have had, will only keep 20% moisture content wood burning with the vent open, or with a coalbed below. The notion that there is some trade off is nonsense - it's either open or close dependant on how hot the owner wants the room to be. It may be the case that air from above works best with briquettes but not with most wood sold on the uk market.
    • Greenfires
    • By Greenfires 15th Oct 13, 10:22 AM
    • 622 Posts
    • 532 Thanks
    Greenfires
    • #7
    • 15th Oct 13, 10:22 AM
    • #7
    • 15th Oct 13, 10:22 AM
    Well as usual you're talking nonsense.

    I stand by it because I AM a chimney sweep and I sweep hundreds of chimneys every year. Perhaps if you'd actually read the thread instead of just jumping in and mouthing off, you'd have noticed that we were talking about burning housecoal in a stove - and if you do a lot of that, your vast experience should tell you you'll have problems. As well as practically filling a liner with thick fluffy soot, you'll often find the mesh on the cowl gets filled up, effectively closing off the top of the chimney. Did you never wonder why almost all stove manufacturers say you shouldn't use housecoal? Or are you a stove manufacturer who knows better than the rest of them as well?

    You also need to make up your mind as to whether you're a sweep or not - it wasn't so long ago that you were on about selling your chimney sweeping business for a huge amount of cash - remember? Anyone else who knows you from old will remember that you've dished out some truly awful "advice" on here over the years.

    As for the air question - well you're just wrong again. Wood on a bed of ash will create it's own coalbed beneath it. Wood on an open clean grate will often just lose all the heart from the fire and you'll end up with charred lumps that end up going out. If you burn decent quality wood in a stove with half decent controls - then it will perform much better in the way I mentioned - and yes, it DOES make a difference. Perhaps you need to go back to stove school and start again....
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 15th Oct 13, 1:43 PM
    • 10,296 Posts
    • 23,762 Thanks
    suki1964
    • #8
    • 15th Oct 13, 1:43 PM
    • #8
    • 15th Oct 13, 1:43 PM
    How can you stand by that waffle as a chimney sweep? People have been burning housecoal in this country for years, and the idea it could block a chimney in a short time is just ludicrous. I sweep myself and have done dozens of chimneys which haven't been swept in years, which are housecoal burners, and although certainly bunked up are nowhere near blocked.

    I even burn it in a 5" clay flue which according to my neighbour was being used, right back to when it was installed in the 60s (ye old Victorian technology being superior to stainless steel and the wafflers who sell it on) which I sweep once a year. It leaves a foot squared of soot, made of wood, coal, smokeless and anything else I bung in through the year.

    As for air from above or below, many appliances, including two stoves I have had, will only keep 20% moisture content wood burning with the vent open, or with a coalbed below. The notion that there is some trade off is nonsense - it's either open or close dependant on how hot the owner wants the room to be. It may be the case that air from above works best with briquettes but not with most wood sold on the uk market.
    Originally posted by highrisklowreturn

    Wayyyyyyy too much soot for a stove. We sweep yearly and wouldn't get a mugful, but then we don't use house coal


    As for burning wood and coal differently, Greenfires is correct, wood from the top vent, coal ( or in a stove smokeless) from the bottom

    When burning wood alone you need an ash bed. Some multi fuel stoves you can remove the grate, others can close the grate, the rest of us have to build the ashes up enough to fill the ash pan and leave a layer in the grate. |Right now I don't have enough seasoned wood to allow me to burn to get to that position so I am "cheating" and am burning wood on the clinkers and ash left from a smokeless fire. Thats giving it the bed and yes I can control my stove with just the top vent. Let air in the bottom and I may as well light fivers with the wood just burning away in minutes

    In work we have an open fire and the crud they burn on that means we need sweeping every couple of weeks. We soon find out we need sweeping - the bar fills with smoke and chokes the diners
  • No4 Winder
    • #9
    • 15th Oct 13, 7:50 PM
    • #9
    • 15th Oct 13, 7:50 PM
    Can I jump in here?
    I had an old Parkray solid fuel roomheater for quite a few years, I burned smokeless coal like, Sunbrite, Phurnicite, Homefire, all the usual sorts that were available at the time.
    I've never had a flue liner and I swear to you that all the time I was burning smokeless, over 20 yrs, I only had the chimney swept once.
    I just didn't need it. So if it works OK, leave it alone.

    I now have a wood burner and for the first 2 and half yrs was mixing wood with house coal. I don't use the coal anymore because I have had to sweep the chimney 4 times in 3 yrs.

    The stuff that came out from the sweeping was like black flour, really fine particles

    I am still burning the wood but now mixing it with Briquettes or Heatlogs, which are much cleaner than coal, with hardly any difference in heat output.

    So, no more coal for me.
  • highrisklowreturn
    Well as usual you're talking nonsense.

    I stand by it because I AM a chimney sweep and I sweep hundreds of chimneys every year. Perhaps if you'd actually read the thread instead of just jumping in and mouthing off, you'd have noticed that we were talking about burning housecoal in a stove - and if you do a lot of that, your vast experience should tell you you'll have problems. As well as practically filling a liner with thick fluffy soot, you'll often find the mesh on the cowl gets filled up, effectively closing off the top of the chimney. Did you never wonder why almost all stove manufacturers say you shouldn't use housecoal? Or are you a stove manufacturer who knows better than the rest of them as well?

    You also need to make up your mind as to whether you're a sweep or not - it wasn't so long ago that you were on about selling your chimney sweeping business for a huge amount of cash - remember? Anyone else who knows you from old will remember that you've dished out some truly awful "advice" on here over the years.

    As for the air question - well you're just wrong again. Wood on a bed of ash will create it's own coalbed beneath it. Wood on an open clean grate will often just lose all the heart from the fire and you'll end up with charred lumps that end up going out. If you burn decent quality wood in a stove with half decent controls - then it will perform much better in the way I mentioned - and yes, it DOES make a difference. Perhaps you need to go back to stove school and start again....
    Originally posted by Greenfires

    Why do you assume most stoves are connected to a liner rather than an open chimney? Industries lies and myths - very lucrative ones - that you cannot vent a solid fuel applicance into an open chimney?

    Why do you assume most people use cowls - most people I know, don't. I have yet to come across one blocked cowl.

    The reason why most manufacturers oppose use of bituminous coal is because of the immediate blast of heat, carried in a higher flame pattern than other coals, which accelerates degradation to internal components of the stove. I have yet to find one reference to blocking the appliance of chimney. They are obviously not advising against it because it may or may not block a 5 inch flue (how are they even to know what their customer has pray tell).

    I never spoke of selling a chimney sweep business - but to you, my advice is always free.
    • Greenfires
    • By Greenfires 16th Oct 13, 12:26 PM
    • 622 Posts
    • 532 Thanks
    Greenfires
    I don't assume anything of the sort. The majority of the stoves I sweep are fitted to lined chimneys, but not all. I don't fit stoves, and I have never advised anyone that a stove MUST have a liner - just that there are a number of benefits from doing so. That's not "industry myths" - that's just fact. And I've seen plenty of cases to prove the point thank you. I've also advised plenty of people that they don't HAVE to have the installation done by a HETAS fitter - I don't have any hidden agenda for making an extra buck.

    As for blocked cowls - the vast majority of the stoves I look after have cowls on the chimneys - that's just the way things are in this part of the world. And I've seen a few blocked as a result of burning housecoal - not many I'll freely admit - but it's not many because very few of my customers do it - and the ones who did and who blocked their cowls don't do it any more!
  • Laura_88
    Sorry when I said coal & logs together I meant smokeless, always forget to add the smokeless!! Thanks so much for the tips! Is it ok to just burn smokeless coal then? It won't clog the liner up?
    • A. Badger
    • By A. Badger 19th Oct 13, 12:36 AM
    • 5,046 Posts
    • 6,442 Thanks
    A. Badger
    Sorry when I said coal & logs together I meant smokeless, always forget to add the smokeless!! Thanks so much for the tips! Is it ok to just burn smokeless coal then? It won't clog the liner up?
    Originally posted by Laura_88
    Smokeless should be absolutely fine. Try several brands though as they are different and some suit some stoves better than others. If it is any help, I have found Taybrite a pretty good compromise on price/performance,
  • philb42
    I burn only wood on my woodburner, a Hunter 8 with grate removed so the wood is burnt on a bed of ash. Mostly this is firewood logs from a local supplier who does a very fair deal, and I season them myself by storing over two summers before burning. As wood is my main heating method I get through a lot of it, and recently I decided to supplement my supply with briquettes. After a good market scour I settled on the Woodfuel Co-operative and bought a one ton pallet of varied types. Having just received this I've only tried the hardwood RUF blocks (which are good), but the other stuff received looks good quality. I included bark ones which I plan to try burning overnight with. I would personally not go for the Verdo ones, which I thought were less compact and lower quality, but if you want to take a look go to the woodfuel coop website (they are based in Dumfries). Whilst not the very cheapest I think they are worth it over cheaper products around, e.g on ebay. Hope this helps.
    • Skulls
    • By Skulls 20th Oct 13, 10:00 AM
    • 356 Posts
    • 2,411 Thanks
    Skulls
    Just bought 20 packs of the Verdo ones to try. Only burnt 3 logs so far over 2 days. It's not that cold. They are on par with UK Heatlogs if not a little better.
    They don't flame as long as the UK Heatlogs but, give out a good heat and only paid £2.49 per 10Kg pack so will update in a few days. Very good for storing as they are almost rectangular.
    • baggiebez
    • By baggiebez 18th Nov 13, 3:50 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    baggiebez
    How how you found the verdos?
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