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  • FIRST POST
    ukbadger
    Dogs and Flats - Bad idea ?
    • #1
    • 29th Apr 07, 4:55 PM
    Dogs and Flats - Bad idea ? 29th Apr 07 at 4:55 PM
    Ok,

    Currently I live in a house in suburbia - being a singleton for the time being I'm selling this place and looking for a fresh start somewhere more central. I've been indulging in a bit of house hunting porn and keep being drawn to some really nice appartments by the river BUT I have a gorgeous 8 year old yorkie.

    Does anyone live in a flat or appartment and have a dog ? Is it possible to do this ? At the moment I work full time (and no I don't need a lecture on this - she is well looked after and has a dog flap into the garden) and just exploring the options.

    Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks

    Hayley

    Last edited by Former MSE Natasha; 15-05-2007 at 8:20 PM.
Page 1
  • mookiandco
    • #2
    • 29th Apr 07, 5:47 PM
    • #2
    • 29th Apr 07, 5:47 PM
    Small dogs and flats can work but if your dog is used to alot of space and freedom, it might take some getting used to. When we lived in a flat, our first few chihuahuas were brought up there. They were litter trained and went for walks in the park a few times a day. They didnt need much space and and it was fine.

    It depends on the personality of your dog as to whether he can yet used to it. My yorkie started slowing down in his later years so was quite happy in a flat and liked his creature comforts.

    The difficulty will be leaving him at home whilst you work. If you can get someone to take him out during the day then that would be better.
  • bestpud
    • #3
    • 29th Apr 07, 7:08 PM
    • #3
    • 29th Apr 07, 7:08 PM
    I agree, it may be more difficult if your dog is used to going in and out as she pleases while you are at work.

    I think they either get used to waiting for a walk to do their toilets (sorry, couldn't think of a better expression without being rude! lol), or going as the urge takes them if they have constant access to a garden, and your dog may be more used to the latter.

    I don't think that means it isn't possible though - just that you'd perhaps have to spend some time getting her used to it - maybe ration the dog flap and gradually wean her off it?

    Assuming you would walk her at least morning and evening, I can't see she would suffer from lack of exercise or fresh air.

    If you work very long hours, perhaps it's worth seeing if there are any dog walkers nearby who could take her out midday?

    Hth

    Bestpud
  • Lyndsay_21
    • #4
    • 29th Apr 07, 7:51 PM
    • #4
    • 29th Apr 07, 7:51 PM
    could you not get a ground floor flat with a garden which will solve the problem???
  • ukbadger
    • #5
    • 29th Apr 07, 8:33 PM
    • #5
    • 29th Apr 07, 8:33 PM
    Thanks for the replies - I have been looking for a garden flat but they're pretty thin on the ground round here. I've got plenty of time to debate I just wondered what you guys thought , your advice is always great.

    Hx
  • poe.tuesday
    • #6
    • 29th Apr 07, 8:42 PM
    • #6
    • 29th Apr 07, 8:42 PM
    A loving home in a flat IMO is better than no home
  • hayleyc
    • #7
    • 29th Apr 07, 9:24 PM
    • #7
    • 29th Apr 07, 9:24 PM
    I have a dog and lived in a flat with no garden for about 6 months. My dog was fine, but as a long-term plan I wouldn't have carried on without having a dog walker to take him out during the day. Many dogs that live in flats end up getting more walks than those with gardens because people have to put in the extra effort rather than just letting them out in to the garden.

    As your dog is used to having constant access to the garden during the day, I would worry that he/she may find it unsettling and distressing to have to go 8hrs without going to the toilet. In that situation, I would definitely get a dog walker or arrange to come home at lunch time. There's no reason your dog can't live in a flat as long as you're prepared to make the extra effort to take it out often enough.

    Hayley
  • Imelda
    • #8
    • 30th Apr 07, 7:51 AM
    • #8
    • 30th Apr 07, 7:51 AM
    Also remember that many leashold flats do not allow pets, be sure to check before you buy.
    Mortgage 17/12/12: 50,00.00
    Offset 17/12/12: 50,000.00
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  • katiesmummy
    • #9
    • 30th Apr 07, 8:32 AM
    • #9
    • 30th Apr 07, 8:32 AM
    i have 2 dogs, a jack russell & a rotweiler cross & i now live in a flat. when i got the dogs i lived in a house but had to move when the council found me a permenant home. i have to say it is very hard work & had i always lived here i would never have got my dogs. i wouldnt reccommend it if you are out all day at work, as you will probably come home & find some little presents around the house. my dogs are never left alone for more than a couple of hours. i am so attached to my dogs and i would never get rid of them, but i do have to spend about 4 hours a day walking them. i would say at the very least get a flat with a balcony so you can let the dog out as soon as you get up, and then you wash it down every couple of days. also, put newspaper down in the kitchen when you go to bed in case he gets desperate for a wee in the night.

    i hope that i am making sense! pm me if you want any more info
  • Bun
    I have lived in several flats, and my main concern would be noise. Your dog will hear noises all the time that it is not used to (doors, people in corridors etc, unless it is a house converted into only two flats as mine is for instance) and you will really run into trouble if your dog is the yapping sort. Most leasehold flats have restrictions on dogs for this reason. Only you know your dog, but personally (based on my experience of terriers in my family) I really wouldn't recommend it.
    Annabeth Charlotte arrived on 7th February 2008, 2.5 weeks early
  • moneysaver1234567
    Hi I live in a London and we have a Little terrier. We currently rent a flat and have a garden, no dog flap but then i work from home and when i don't my dog goes to a lady who does local doggie day care (12 per day v cheap here!). I wouldn't dream of leaving her at home all day, dogs need stimulation and company they are pack animals.
    Get a flat with a garden, some flats have rules (particularly if in blocks) that no dogs are allowed. Also if renting beware of lazy lettings agents who tend to show you really grotty things which are still expensive if you have a dog, don't stand for this, look long and hard and i promise you something always comes up! Tell them you have references for your dog from places it has lived, friends/ carers etc...It's normally necessary to pay up to 6 weeks damages deposit too with a dog . Always make sure you have it in writing that you can have a dog on the premises, if you rent or buy and then find it's "no dogs allowed" out they'll expect you and you're pal to part company boo hoo. Good luck garden flat living with dogs is perfect!
  • JennyW
    Yes pets and flats do work. We live in a 2 bed ground floor maisonette with garden and we have 2 large dogs - they are very happy . In some cases it works better because owners need to walk their dogs instead of chucking them in the garden (as what happens with some dogs who live in houses).

    You have quite a small dog so I would have no hesitation in moving to a flat - however you'll just need to make sure that dogs are allowed.
  • missheatherwilson
    I have a 3 year old pug and she loves living in my flat, however, she is pretty lazy and sleeps 24/7! So if your dog is a bit hyper I would try and get the biggest flat you could afford.

    I leasehold a two bed flat in a local authority block and I wrote to the council asking for permission, but they didn't reply so I took that as a yes!! I also went to see all my neighbours and ask them if it was OK, and when I got her, I took her round again to let her meet the neighbours and give them my number in case she was doing their head in when I was at work. I have never had any complaints and they love fussing her when we're out!

    All the best!
  • Emy
    We have a greyhound in a flat (they make great apartment dogs as they are 40mph couch potatoes!) and it works really well. It means we do have to take her out and walk her which is good. Greyhounds can't be left outside anyway so they're suited to those without a garden.
  • broke & confused
    We have a greyhound in a flat (they make great apartment dogs as they are 40mph couch potatoes!)
    Originally posted by Emy
    You beat me to it! I have a smashing rescue greyhound, and I live in a flat.

    The Blue Cross did a thorough visit before I was allowed him, and luckily there is a HUGE park just round the corner, he gets walked twice a day, but that aside, he's the laziest dog ever!

    You know your dog best.
  • mickeyboi
    We have a greyhound in a flat (they make great apartment dogs as they are 40mph couch potatoes!) and it works really well. It means we do have to take her out and walk her which is good. Greyhounds can't be left outside anyway so they're suited to those without a garden.
    Originally posted by Emy

    We live in a ground floor flat with no garden but we are lucky enough to have a dog walking park directly opposite and also 2 large woods close by. We have a greyhound puppy and got him because all the research we did we found that greyhounds were most suited to apartments / flats as they are so lazy.

    The only problem we are having is leaving him by himself. I am at home all day but if I need to pop out to the shops for half hour he absolutely howls the building down.

    Does anyone have any advice on what we can do to get him used to being by himself for up to a couple of hours?
    We have tried leaving him in a room and then leaving for 5 minutes and trying to build up the time. But from 1 second after leaving the room he starts crying and howling.

    At night he wont sleep in the living room in his create but creeps on to the bed and then we take him back to the living room but this carries on the whole night. We tried shutting the bedroom door but he cries outside the door and as its late we dont want to leave him there so have to give in.
  • sammy_kaye18
    could you not put his crate in your bedroom. That way you could lock him in it but he may still feel secure because he can hear/see that your in the room with him so might stop him howling. Then gradually after a while move it closer and closer to the door until hes eventually out of your room again??


    with regards to dogs - i have a jack russell/staffy cross in my falt - had i researched the breed before i wouldnt have picked a jack though - purely for the amount of energy he seems to have. I have looked at gettign him a companion and rescuing a greyhound though as these are ment ot make good pets. We live on a ground floor but the garden is communal so he cant go in it unless hes supervised all the time becuase we cant put up a fence. But i dont see why a dog cant live in a flat

    I agree with the comment a loving home in a flat is better than no home at all. The last people who had our dog (before his rescue home) treated him badly and neglected him severely and they were in a house. now hes happy and healthy in a little 2 bed flat. love makes all the difference

    Mummy of two Munchkins - one princess and one prince.
    Trying to save and get back on the OS wagon
    NOT BUYING IT 2015
    MAKE DO, MEND AND MINIMISE IN 2015
  • f1re_cr4cker
    def check re if your'e allowed one i know most leasehold ones dont.
  • WeirdoMagnet
    Just so others know this is an old thread from April last year, and the Op hasn't been on MSE since October last year!
    "No matter how little money and how few possesions you own, having a dog makes you rich." - Louis Sabin
  • mickeyboi
    could you not put his crate in your bedroom. That way you could lock him in it but he may still feel secure because he can hear/see that your in the room with him so might stop him howling. Then gradually after a while move it closer and closer to the door until hes eventually out of your room again??


    with regards to dogs - i have a jack russell/staffy cross in my falt - had i researched the breed before i wouldnt have picked a jack though - purely for the amount of energy he seems to have. I have looked at gettign him a companion and rescuing a greyhound though as these are ment ot make good pets. We live on a ground floor but the garden is communal so he cant go in it unless hes supervised all the time becuase we cant put up a fence. But i dont see why a dog cant live in a flat

    I agree with the comment a loving home in a flat is better than no home at all. The last people who had our dog (before his rescue home) treated him badly and neglected him severely and they were in a house. now hes happy and healthy in a little 2 bed flat. love makes all the difference
    Originally posted by sammy_kaye18

    Yeh - We will try that... thank you!.. yeh I agree about having a dog in flat.. I can see the look of horror on peoples faces when I tell them we live in a flat and have a dog. There is someone who lives down the road in a house who has a dog. I have never seen the dog walked. The only thing about having a dog in a flat is that the owner needs to take more responsibilty and make sure the dog gets walked or taken outside on a regular basis and thats all part of having a dog for us..

    Oh and to the other person.. yeah I did know it was an old thread.. Just saw the postings and wanted to see if anyone would come back and they did.. thanks..
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