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    • zeupater
    • By zeupater 7th Jan 13, 5:36 PM
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    zeupater
    Solar ... In the news
    • #1
    • 7th Jan 13, 5:36 PM
    Solar ... In the news 7th Jan 13 at 5:36 PM
    Hi All

    Thought it was about time we had a thread specifically to discuss relevant press articles relating to solar pv & thermal ..... so here goes ...

    Z
    Last edited by zeupater; 07-01-2013 at 5:48 PM.
    "We are what we repeatedly do, excellence then is not an act, but a habit. " ...... Aristotle
Page 89
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 26th Jun 17, 11:45 AM
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    Martyn1981
    EOS sell grid scale storage at $160/kWh (for 40MWh+ deals), which at 5,000+ cycles works out at a storage cost of $32/MWh, or $16/MWh if we assume 50% of generation needs storage. So that would lift UK PV (or on-shore wind) costs by about £12/MWh. Giving us a PV or on-shore wind price (with storage) heading for about £62/MWh.

    EOS have just announced that they will contract for 2022 delivery their batteries at $95/kWh (not the $160/kWh mentioned above), taking my estimated PV or on-shore wind plus storage price down to £57/MWh.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    I thought perhaps I should post a bit more on this, as cheap storage is the game changer for renewables, and the $160/kWh product is very good today, but taking orders at $95/kWh for 2022 delivery is staggering.

    That means we don't have to make predictions, nor argue optimistically about the large scale storage future, as we now have solid numbers to fall back on.

    These prices really are game changers, not only because they are fulfilling the promise of cheap storage, but because they give confidence on investing in renewables going forward, and the ability of a storage backed grid to help with intermittency issues as and when we start to reach limits/problems.

    Here are some articles on it:

    Extract from weekly Carbon Commentary newsletter:

    10, Non-lithium batteries. EOS, one of the leadership contenders in large grid-storage batteries, said that it would sell its units at a guaranteed $95/kWh for delivery in 2022. If a unit lasts 20 years and works every day, the implied capital cost is less than 2 US cents a kwh of stored electricity. Lithium ion batteries are currently well over $150/kWh. EOS has a plausible and very safe battery technology that uses earth-abundant materials. My guess is that most large static storage installations will not use lithium in ten years, although cars almost certainly will. (A small sigh of personal relief here: I mentioned EOS as a candidate for global success in The Switch. Another manufacturer I similarly rated went bankrupt on the day the book was published).
    Storage fit for the distributed energy future

    Eos Energy Storage drives down costs on battery systems to below $100 per kWh

    Eos Energy Storage Now Taking Orders at $95/kWh for the Eos Aurora® DC Battery System
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 26th Jun 17, 11:40 PM
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    silverwhistle
    The Guardian ran a similar article, which on day one received a huge number of posts from individuals speaking out against HPC. But by day two, the usual 5-10 (nuclear at any price) posters then flooded the comments with mis-information and spin against renewables, Anyone else?
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Yetpu, Raykalon, Quokka.....
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 27th Jun 17, 12:10 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Yetpu, Raykalon, Quokka.....
    Originally posted by silverwhistle
    ...... Riveness, ChapStewie, ComfortablyPlumb* ....

    small number, but prolific amount of posts ..... even I can't compete and get trolled out on almost every positive RE post now, as they don't like me very much ..... Moi, Shirley not!

    * 1,000's of posts, all anti-RE spin especially against PV, to which he's entitled to an opinion, no law against being an idiot, but all the time claims to support RE 100% ........ cough-TROLL-cough
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • michaels
    • By michaels 27th Jun 17, 1:33 PM
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    michaels
    I thought perhaps I should post a bit more on this, as cheap storage is the game changer for renewables, and the $160/kWh product is very good today, but taking orders at $95/kWh for 2022 delivery is staggering.

    That means we don't have to make predictions, nor argue optimistically about the large scale storage future, as we now have solid numbers to fall back on.

    These prices really are game changers, not only because they are fulfilling the promise of cheap storage, but because they give confidence on investing in renewables going forward, and the ability of a storage backed grid to help with intermittency issues as and when we start to reach limits/problems.

    Here are some articles on it:

    Extract from weekly Carbon Commentary newsletter:



    Storage fit for the distributed energy future

    Eos Energy Storage drives down costs on battery systems to below $100 per kWh

    Eos Energy Storage Now Taking Orders at $95/kWh for the Eos Aurora® DC Battery System
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Is there not still a need to factor in some cost for gas/diesel generation capacity backup for those windless autumn/winter weeks even if it is virtually never used?

    Analogy: we have an electric car that does 95% of our miles but for the very occasional longer journey or when we need two cars we have a second car. What matters when costing this car are capital tied up, depreciation and relaibility given usage pattern - mpg is pretty much unimportant as it does less than 1000 miles per year. Our overall carbon footprint remains low from the EV miles. When working out our overall cost per mile we have to include the costs for this second car as the EV alone will not meet all our needs.
    Last edited by michaels; 27-06-2017 at 1:38 PM.
    Cool heads and compromise
    • michaels
    • By michaels 27th Jun 17, 1:43 PM
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    michaels
    Talking of storage there was an interesting article on the bbc on using formic acid as a hydrogen storage medium for fuel cell buses. Seems it could be combined with CCS as it needs a source of CO2 somewhere in the process. No idea what the efficiencies are but potentiallty another method of storing energy from times of excess generation to be used when needed - obviously the capacity of the storage depends only on how big a tank is available and indeed the 'energy' could be transported say from a solar factory in the sahara to anywhere that needed it.
    Cool heads and compromise
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 27th Jun 17, 2:59 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Is there not still a need to factor in some cost for gas/diesel generation capacity backup for those windless autumn/winter weeks even if it is virtually never used?
    Originally posted by michaels
    Yes there is, and it's only fair to do so. These costs are generally referred to as 'intermittency costs', the additional costs that a 'grid' has to bear to accommodate the intermittent generation.

    They are actually difficult to pin down. You'd think that capacity factor would be the main concern, and as PV in the UK has a cf of about 11% that should mean the highest intermittency costs, since on-shore wind has a cf of about 25-30% and off-shore wind is about 40-50%, whilst HPC will be around 92% if run continuously apart from refueling, approx 2 months every two years.

    But, nothing is simple. The costs also depend on when the generation occurs, and PV generating during the day when demand is high, and in the summer when wind and hydro are at their lowest, has a beneficial advantage, plus renewables tend to pull down spot prices making the average price of leccy lower.

    CP (mentioned in my previous post) often claims that the intermittency cost of PV is approx £50/MWh, however the latest analysis suggests it's £1.30/MWh today, with a possible max of £6.80/MWh if we have about 3x as much PV in the future, but would actually drop to minus £3.70/MWh if we have 8GW+ of storage on the UK grid.

    So pretty positive news going forward with PV (and on-shore wind) heading for £50/MWh. Adding on those intermittency costs for PV takes it's actual cost to between £46.30 - £56.80/MWh.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 27th Jun 17, 3:05 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Tand indeed the 'energy' could be transported say from a solar factory in the sahara to anywhere that needed it.
    Originally posted by michaels
    I read a similar story about Australia. Whilst hydrogen gas (produced from excess PV) is a pain to transport due to the costs of cooling and compressing, they've found that making liquid ammonia from it, gives a very dense product that can be shipped around, potentially to other countries, effectively selling sunlight .... cool.

    I've no idea how practical these ideas are, but as we already import LNG, I can certainly imagine a time when the UK imports 'sunlight' from the Sahara (using the H2 to produce leccy (fuel cells) or methane).

    Fun times ahead.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 28th Jun 17, 11:39 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Interesting idea here, it's basically offering a PPA (power purchase agreement) to housing association properties to lower their energy bills.

    If it scales up it could potentially double the current UK PV rollout, which is really poor.

    Solarplicity readies significant low-subsidy housing association solar model
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Update on this story with the formal launch of the scheme:

    Solarplicity offers £200 million in savings with social housing solar model

    It is expected that the scheme will reach 50,000 households in the next twelve months and 800,000 homes within five years, at which stage these tenants are forecast to save up to £200 million a year through the scheme.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 28th Jun 17, 4:16 PM
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    Cardew
    I've no idea how practical these ideas are, but as we already import LNG, I can certainly imagine a time when the UK imports 'sunlight' from the Sahara (using the H2 to produce leccy (fuel cells) or methane).
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    I believe that idea(PV farms in the Sahara) was muted some years ago, and dismissed on security grounds; and that was before ISIS became a bigger threat than Al Queda.
    • ed110220
    • By ed110220 28th Jun 17, 8:18 PM
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    ed110220
    I believe that idea(PV farms in the Sahara) was muted some years ago, and dismissed on security grounds; and that was before ISIS became a bigger threat than Al Queda.
    Originally posted by Cardew
    Another reason would be that the rapidly falling cost of PV renders the need to put it in the Sahara obsolete. For example the south of Spain would produce roughly 20% less electricity from the same PV as areas in the Sahara. It hasn't taken long for PV costs to fall by 20%.

    Why put the PV in a risky place with higher transmission costs when a year or two of falling prices would give the same kWh/£ nearer and safer?

    Ed
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 28th Jun 17, 8:31 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Why put the PV in a risky place with higher transmission costs when a year or two of falling prices would give the same kWh/£ nearer and safer?

    Ed
    Originally posted by ed110220
    Hiya, the idea with Australia and hydrogen, is that they could sell sunshine to say Japan, which may have an energy shortage due to relative populations and land area.

    Whether the hydrogen is then used for fuel directly, or to produce leccy via fuel cells, gives some choice, but the difference between this idea and simply HVDC transmission, is that the leccy is already in a dense form of storage for later use, rather than real time.

    Found the article if you're interested.

    How Australia can use hydrogen to export its solar power around the world

    Some extracts:-

    “The ability of hydrogen is it does not emit carbon dioxide when it is burned,” says Prof Dongke Zhang, director of the University of Western Australia’s energy centre. Therefore, if hydrogen can be produced using only energy from renewable sources, such as wind, solar, or hydro, then we don’t have to worry about carbon dioxide production at all.
    Hydrogen-fuelled cars have the added advantage of potentially taking a far shorter time to refuel – as little as five minutes with compressed high pressure gas – compared with an electric vehicle, which might need six to eight hours to recharge, he says.

    Andrews also sees hydrogen being used to store excess electricity at the grid, or even the individual household, level. “So you have excess electricity fed into an electrolyser, produce hydrogen, compress it or store it in some way and then when you want to get the energy back you put it into a fuel cell and then back to the grid.”
    But there is still the challenge of getting the hydrogen to Japan. One option is to compress it into liquid form, but this requires the gas to be cooled to around -250C, which is energy intensive.

    Another option is to combine the hydrogen with nitrogen to make ammonia. It’s a technique that is well-established, and has been done on an industrial scale for nearly a century, Dolan says. Ammonia can be compressed into a liquid at much more moderate temperatures, and is relatively easy to transport. Indeed in January 2017, Australia and Japan announced safety standards for shipping liquid hydrogen in bulk for the first time.
    So rather than Australia selling coal to India and China, a market that is currently collapsing, they could install massive PV farms, and sell energy to Japan.

    Sounds like fun.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 28th Jun 17, 9:46 PM
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    Martyn1981
    GTM Predicts 27% Drop In Solar Prices By 2022

    Hopefully in a year or two, but certainly before 2022, we'll see the MIP (minimum import price) removed too, which is holding back a price reduction of about 25% v's Asian PV prices.

    So, possibly around 45% cheaper than today. Might as well slap it on everything, at half the cost, wall mounted PV at 70% efficiency (v's 30d pitch) would work fine.

    This University (pretty damn north) gets half it's energy from wall mounted PV.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 6th Jul 17, 3:50 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Four in ten homeowners want solar and storage by 2020 says E.On

    New research has found that almost half of those asked would like to see solar and storage installed in the their homes by 2020, signalling that the domestic market may yet recover from the hard knocks of recent subsidy cuts.

    The survey of 2,000 homeowners conducted by E.On found that when asked about the types of smart technologies they would want in their homes, four in ten (44%) said they’d like solar panels and/or an electricity battery storage system by the end of the decade.

    This beat out the likes of smart lighting systems (35%) and an electric vehicle charging point (13%), despite the obvious synergies between the technologies.

    Not that we'll ever catch up with Australia

    One-quarter of Australian homes now have solar
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 7th Jul 17, 5:42 PM
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    Martyn1981
    This seems both significant and ironic.

    Coal Authority to clean up its act with the help of UK solar

    The times they are a changin!
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 17th Jul 17, 3:41 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Possibly, perhaps, maybe ...
    ....... subsidy free PV?

    Next year could bring us a subsidy free PV farm. There's no detailed info yet on whether this will be sold to the grid, or some sort of arrangement with a company (as a PPA), but either way it's very good news, and it's a 'biggie'.

    Hive readies ‘subsidy free’ solar farm for summer 2018 build

    Hive Energy has revealed it is planning to build a solar farm in the UK without subsidy support next summer.

    The UK-based developer has received planning permission for a 40MW solar farm at Woodington Farm, located on land surrounding the company’s headquarters near Romsey, Hampshire.

    SPP originally reported on the project back in December 2015 when plans first emerged, with Hive having made a number of concessions to receive consent. The size of the array has been scaled back from original proposals, while bridle paths have been restored and a 25-year biodiversity plan has been put into place.

    But the development will be most notable given that it is planned to be developed without any subsidy support from the UK government.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 18th Jul 17, 11:53 AM
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    Martyn1981
    UK’s ‘largest solar carport’ – with additional storage – planned for St Ives Park & Ride

    Cambridgeshire County Council has received planning permission for what it claims will be the UK’s largest solar carport.

    The installation, which will be developed at the site of St Ives’ Park & Ride, is anticipated to be 948kW in size and combined with a battery storage system as part of a wider demonstrator project with collaboration from distribution network operator UK Power Networks (UKPN).
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 20th Jul 17, 8:24 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Future forecasts for PV suggest that the incredible year on year growth rates will slow down, but still expected to exceed 100GWp pa by 2021.

    Global Solar Demand Will Exceed 80 GW In 2017; 9.6 GW Awarded In Q3 Alone

    The graph (near the bottom) suggests just a 5.3% annual growth in demand, but solar has always exceeded predictions, and this year was expected to be less than last year.

    Also costs are still falling, which means it keeps creating new demand as it overtakes other forms of generation especially as storage costs are falling fast too now, and together they are quite a formidable solution.

    Looking good.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 24th Jul 17, 5:15 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Nothing special, just saw this and thought I'd share.

    1m by 1.7m PV panels from LG, 21% efficient and 360W. Not bad.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • zeupater
    • By zeupater 24th Jul 17, 6:40 PM
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    zeupater
    Nothing special, just saw this and thought I'd share.

    1m by 1.7m PV panels from LG, 21% efficient and 360W. Not bad.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Hi

    Expensive though, just checked it out ... looks like around a 40% - 90% premium (£/Wp) over other 300W+ panels ....

    HTH
    Z
    "We are what we repeatedly do, excellence then is not an act, but a habit. " ...... Aristotle
    • NigeWick
    • By NigeWick 25th Jul 17, 3:54 PM
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    NigeWick
    1m by 1.7m PV panels from LG, 21% efficient and 360W. Not bad.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    But, are they as cheap per Watt as 250W panels?
    The mind of the bigot is like the pupil of the eye; the more light you pour upon it, the more it will contract.
    Oliver Wendell Holmes
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