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  • droogie
    • #2
    • 27th Apr 07, 4:13 PM
    • #2
    • 27th Apr 07, 4:13 PM
    We recently paid about 300 but that was as part of a getting our kitchen rewired after discovering dodgy wiring during a replaster.

    I think they said the unit was 270 plus labour.

    I hope that helps some
    • baldelectrician
    • By baldelectrician 27th Apr 07, 5:21 PM
    • 1,938 Posts
    • 1,164 Thanks
    baldelectrician
    • #3
    • 27th Apr 07, 5:21 PM
    • #3
    • 27th Apr 07, 5:21 PM
    there is a bit of hassle in changing a consumer unit

    The bonding (earthing of the pipes may need to be upgraded).

    Ball park figure 250 - 350

    My price is generally 250 for a straight forward job.
  • Alan50
    • #4
    • 27th Apr 07, 5:34 PM
    New consumer unit.
    • #4
    • 27th Apr 07, 5:34 PM
    I normally charge between 250.00 to 450.00 depending on the installation work and testing required. The main eguipotential bonding to the gas and water services must comply with BS:7671 hence the price difference.

    The work will require certification for Building regulations approval, NICEIC domestic installers can self-certificate there work.

    Time: normally half to one day

    British Gas have entered the domestic electrical installation market for this type of work, ask them for a quote.

    Good luck Alan

    NICEIC domestic installer See www.NICEIC.com for electrical safety advice
    • Moneymaker
    • By Moneymaker 27th Apr 07, 11:05 PM
    • 1,981 Posts
    • 782 Thanks
    Moneymaker
    • #5
    • 27th Apr 07, 11:05 PM
    • #5
    • 27th Apr 07, 11:05 PM
    The work will require certification for Building regulations approval, NICEIC domestic installers can self-certificate there work.
    Originally posted by Alan50
    I think you meant "can self-certify their work".

    Does that mean they write out a certificate for you on completion and you store it with your house deeds?
    • baldelectrician
    • By baldelectrician 28th Apr 07, 11:40 PM
    • 1,938 Posts
    • 1,164 Thanks
    baldelectrician
    • #6
    • 28th Apr 07, 11:40 PM
    • #6
    • 28th Apr 07, 11:40 PM
    Some contractors write them out there and then, I do them on my PC (looks a lot better and no handwriting errors).I drop thyem in a few days later or post them.
  • Tashja
    • #7
    • 29th Apr 07, 2:09 PM
    • #7
    • 29th Apr 07, 2:09 PM
    Hi guys

    Thanks so much for your help.

    Turned into a bit of a mess-up

    Found a fried (who is certified electrician) and he agreed to do it for 150.00. During the work there was a fult in the wiring and he was here for 6 hours yesterday and is back again today for another 3 hours

    He has agreed to keep the price at 150.00 but after reading this we have paid him extra. He s only doing it because he felt sorry for me being 7 weeks pregnant and with no kitchen.

    Thankfully it looks like my kitchen installation can go ahead and all the wiring in our house has been bought up to standad.

    Thanks again - you guys are great

    T xx
    Comp wins from 2011


    11k in 2011 - 20.01
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