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  • FIRST POST
    grumpybear
    Words of Wisdom for a new Sprollie Owner
    • #1
    • 16th Dec 12, 4:37 PM
    Words of Wisdom for a new Sprollie Owner 16th Dec 12 at 4:37 PM
    Hi Folks

    My sister just got a baby sprollie (springer x collie) - he's really cute - but sure to be a bit of a handful!

    I've known Springers and Collies before but never even heard about a sprollie until she got one , seems to me that they could be a bit of a handful - bouncy, greedy and intense ;/ but hopefully more cuddly, sweet and intelligent

    Anyone else had any experience with them and can give us any pointers as to what to expect?

    Were quite a doggy family (I've had rotties before) but this is the first pup in our corner of the family for years - so would be good to know whats what so we can start him off right as my sister first dog and the "baby" of the family he's bound to be more than a little bit spoiled!
Page 2
    • colin xx51
    • By colin xx51 24th Nov 15, 4:16 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    colin xx51
    Wonderfull dogs
    I have had my sprollie Oakley for over 3 years and have to say of all the dogs ive had he is the best by a country mile.
    the most friendliest BREED of dog you could ever have, yes he is energetic and keeps us busy but would not swap him for any dog.
    There are many mixed breeds of dogs now and all have a right to be called a breed.
    I paid £120.00 for mine but would have paid a lot more if id knew what I was getting.
    Last edited by colin xx51; 24-11-2015 at 4:17 PM. Reason: WRONG HEADER
    • Kathy Thompson
    • By Kathy Thompson 26th Dec 16, 4:15 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Kathy Thompson
    We had one for 14 years. He was the best family dog. He was great for me because I had adhd, was very high energy, and he was very intelligent. He loved to go for truck rides with my dad. He knew a lot of tricks. My dad taught him a lot of tricks, and would take him into his third grade class room. He would have the dog compete against the kids to see who could solve the math problem first. My dad would write a math problem on the board and then say ok, who can get it first. My dog was very good and usually beat the kids by barking the answer. He could climb a ladder. He always knew that when jeopardy came on the TV, to jump up on the chair to look out the window to see if my bus had dropped me off yet. He was an indoor, outdoor dog. We didn't use him to hunt or anything, but he did have some hip problems when he got older. But that's just because he gained weight. Once he got the weight off, then he was right as rain.
    I've been looking for one near MN, but am having a hard time finding one.
    He was a mix of a border collie and English Springer Spaniel. Two very smart dogs. He was black and white with very beautiful eyes. Endearing to the heart.
    • Hannahnutloop
    • By Hannahnutloop 9th Mar 17, 10:06 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Hannahnutloop
    I realise this is an old post, but you have to laugh that those that are negative do not own Sprollies. Yes its not a real breed name, and no they are not expensive breeds, its just a way of describing there genetic make up! (Mine got rather friendly recently with my sisters Labrador - so we may well see some Sproladors soon which I think is an ACE name.)

    There is a post above which describes what happens with cross breeding and is bang on - we deliberately WANTED a cross breed - intelligent, energetic dog to match our lifestyle and enhance it, but wanted the loving family dog too - my husband had springers before, and understood that the cross breeding tends to remove the negative triats about a breed (tumours etc).

    We did some puppy training, but then researched and did the rest ourselves, and he is a loving, cuddly, well behaved dog that does nothing different to other puppies- bit jumpy on people (but not on my parents as he picks up they don't like dogs, mucch gentler with them!) bored, he'll chew something, but that since he's got older has improved loads. I know Lab's that were 10 years old and eating shoes like treats, he's never done that just likes a skirting board near the door! He is a real creature of habit, we've trained him to go in the same spot in the garden, so its not random, and not near where the kids play.

    We have chickens that free range, and he never goes for them, he'd like to chase, but they stand up to him so he backs off. He puts up with 3 high energy children, and his intellegence means he toilet trained fast. Worst thing is the pulling on the lead, but we live in the country so its only for a short while.

    He joins in singing happy birthday with us (the only song he'll sing along too!), and when its walk time makes noises like "go,go go" in a very soft howl which is so lovely, his communication is fabulous. He rarely barks, only if he wants to be let back in, and as long as he gets 30 minutes to an hour a day (which any dog needs!) then he sleeps (usually on my feet if I'm working from home) and is so chilled out. He;s not greedy, in fact dropped his own meals down to two himself, and doesn't beg for food when we eat, or jump on countertops to grab food, which other dogs I know do.

    As he grows older and his needs change we have the work/life between the two of us to accomodate that.
    At the moment we don't do lots of stimulation, or agility, but will see what he needs, as he is very content as he is.

    Each dog like a human is individual in their temprement & personality, & they have breed traits. These dogs love training (at home though - on a walk he just wants to run, no interest in treat training or ball training, but the work at home pays off when out walking) We got lucky with a great dog, but wouldn't hesitate in having another Spollie.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 9th Mar 17, 11:31 AM
    • 679 Posts
    • 1,282 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    (Mine got rather friendly recently with my sisters Labrador - so we may well see some Sproladors soon which I think is an ACE name.)
    Originally posted by Hannahnutloop
    If this is true, please get your animals neutered, there are far too many unwanted dogs in rescues already.
    • Pop Up Pirate
    • By Pop Up Pirate 15th Mar 17, 7:53 AM
    • 693 Posts
    • 1,593 Thanks
    Pop Up Pirate
    Hi Folks

    My sister just got a baby sprollie (springer x collie) - he's really cute - but sure to be a bit of a handful!

    I've known Springers and Collies before but never even heard about a sprollie until she got one , seems to me that they could be a bit of a handful - bouncy, greedy and intense ;/ but hopefully more cuddly, sweet and intelligent

    Anyone else had any experience with them and can give us any pointers as to what to expect?

    Were quite a doggy family (I've had rotties before) but this is the first pup in our corner of the family for years - so would be good to know whats what so we can start him off right as my sister first dog and the "baby" of the family he's bound to be more than a little bit spoiled!
    Originally posted by grumpybear
    Your dog is a mongrel, not a 'breed'.

    What was wrong with getting a Springer or a Collie?
    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 15th Mar 17, 8:22 AM
    • 249 Posts
    • 217 Thanks
    bertiewhite
    Just to play devil's advocate - when does a "designer" mongrel become an accepted breed?

    eg I have Leonbergers which were originally bred from Newfoundlands/St Bernards with a bit of Pyranean Mountain dog thrown in.
    Last edited by bertiewhite; 15-03-2017 at 8:38 AM.
    • Lioness Twinkletoes
    • By Lioness Twinkletoes 16th Mar 17, 9:31 PM
    • 1,029 Posts
    • 3,341 Thanks
    Lioness Twinkletoes
    Your dog is a mongrel, not a 'breed'.

    What was wrong with getting a Springer or a Collie?
    Originally posted by Pop Up Pirate
    They wanted the dog that they got. Besides which, this post is years old so I suggest you take your sanctimonious attitude elsewhere.
    • Isl22
    • By Isl22 29th Mar 17, 5:29 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Isl22
    Honeslty some of these replies are literally ludicrous. Just because we call it sprollie doesn't not mean we class it as some designer breed, it's literally just a speedier way of describing the mix of breeds.

    Some people (myself included) choose to go get mixbreeds for a number of reasons and to have a new designer breed is not one of them. I would never want to actively encourage kennel club and any type of pure breeding, it generates dogs with neurotic behaviours and underline genetic problems. Getting a mix breed tends to mean that you get a lot of the good characteristics of whatever breeds you're mixing but with less of the crazy.

    I myself have a sprollie who is the most kind natured, gentle and friendly active dog. He needs lots of love, attention and excercise but so would any collie or springer. Just be responsible when picking a dog to make sure it suits your needs. Having said that he literally has a 45min-hour walk in the morning and then sleeps and cuddles all day. Having owned both a collie and a springer beforehand I can wholeheartedly say that my sprollie is all the good bits without any of the neuroticism. He's been incredibly easy to train, he knows over 25 tricks and commands, has excellent recall, doesn't jump and is just generally a very good dog. If you're getting a very intelligent breed just make the most of it and get them started with obedience very young and you will reap the rewards. My pup adores being trained and goes mad when the clicker comes out.


    So everyone stop being so crazy judgmental over people you don't know and dogs you don't know. As long as you pick a dog that suits your lifestyle you'll have a happy and healthier pup if you go mixed breed
    • bugslet
    • By bugslet 30th Mar 17, 8:41 AM
    • 4,919 Posts
    • 24,936 Thanks
    bugslet
    Honeslty some of these replies are literally ludicrous. Just because we call it sprollie doesn't not mean we class it as some designer breed, it's literally just a speedier way of describing the mix of breeds.

    Some people (myself included) choose to go get mixbreeds for a number of reasons and to have a new designer breed is not one of them. I would never want to actively encourage kennel club and any type of pure breeding, it generates dogs with neurotic behaviours and underline genetic problems. Getting a mix breed tends to mean that you get a lot of the good characteristics of whatever breeds you're mixing but with less of the crazy.

    I myself have a sprollie who is the most kind natured, gentle and friendly active dog. He needs lots of love, attention and excercise but so would any collie or springer. Just be responsible when picking a dog to make sure it suits your needs. Having said that he literally has a 45min-hour walk in the morning and then sleeps and cuddles all day. Having owned both a collie and a springer beforehand I can wholeheartedly say that my sprollie is all the good bits without any of the neuroticism. He's been incredibly easy to train, he knows over 25 tricks and commands, has excellent recall, doesn't jump and is just generally a very good dog. If you're getting a very intelligent breed just make the most of it and get them started with obedience very young and you will reap the rewards. My pup adores being trained and goes mad when the clicker comes out.


    So everyone stop being so crazy judgmental over people you don't know and dogs you don't know. As long as you pick a dog that suits your lifestyle you'll have a happy and healthier pup if you go mixed breed
    Originally posted by Isl22
    Well it can do.

    My most recent dog is a Giant Schnauzer. I've been hankering after on for over 20 years. She's now 9 months, still a bit puppy bonkers, but already the traits that I fell in love with decades ago are becoming more obvious. AFAIK, GSs have no particular hereditary problems healthwise. Additionally I'm picky about not having dogs that have been bred with deformaties such as flat faces and elongated bodies.

    Equally I'm picky about a breeder, be it of a GS or a Sprollie, that cares about the dogs and isn't just out for a quick buck. There are popular 'mainstream' breeds, Pugs are an obvious example and the mixes 'Cockerpoos' for example, that are bred by unscrupulous breeders for no other reason than they can make money out of them. My bone of contention not what people call it, it's when people make out that they have a 'breed' and it isn't; I met a Wiepoo (Wiemaraner/Poodle X), which the owner proudly explained was only the second litter in the UK. I don't mind who crosses what with what ( within a certain amount of reason), but a first generation Wiepoo, you've got a template for breed traits and characteristics, but it's going to be a while before you can really define it and that's what a name does - it defines a dog. Jack Russel is short for bolshy little monster with attitude, Labrador is short for chews furniture and steals your dinner, Afghan is short for fast, glam and slightly dim. A Wiepoo is short for.....?

    Bertiwhite makes a good point that crosses do become breeds eventually. My GS is a case in point, and going far enough back, all dogs are. My other love is pretty much any of the Spitz breeds, for minimal human tampering. Maybe there is a degree of romanticism in me, but it does seem as if breeds were once crossed more for a reason, where as nowadays there are people who breed dogs with no real reason other than the bottom line in mind.

    Sprollies are probably a reasonable* cross, both intelligent active dogs and possibly there is a good reason for the cross of a herding dog with a retrieving dog. * Not being funny there, I just literally do not know.
    Last edited by bugslet; 30-03-2017 at 8:48 AM.
    • candygirl
    • By candygirl 31st Mar 17, 1:42 AM
    • 25,370 Posts
    • 101,951 Thanks
    candygirl
    I actually had a Springer XCollie over 25 years ago.He was the most loving, gentle dog ever, but needed lots of exercise and stimulation , or he would destroy the house
    He was my first dog, grew up with my DD , and we were heartbroken when he died
    Never called him a Sprollie though
    "You can't stop the waves, but you can learn to surf"

    (Kabat-Zinn 2004)
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