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  • FIRST POST
    • MadelinesMum
    • By MadelinesMum 13th Dec 12, 11:01 AM
    • 854Posts
    • 2,074Thanks
    MadelinesMum
    Dr Marten Boots
    • #1
    • 13th Dec 12, 11:01 AM
    Dr Marten Boots 13th Dec 12 at 11:01 AM
    Hi all, I hope this is the right place.
    I've always wanted a pair of Doc Martens and finally got a pair from ebay but I can't drive in them. I just can't put the clutch peddle right down and I'm also worried about the brake. Does anyone else have this problem? (perhaps I'm just weird). Most of my journeys involve driving and you can appreciate it's not easy to change the boots every time I want to drive.

    The boots are not worn in yet, so any tips on how to make the leather more supple or perhaps I should just put them back on ebay?
    Thanks in advance
    I must remember that "Money Saving" is not buying heavily discounted items that I do not need.
Page 1
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 13th Dec 12, 11:19 AM
    • 3,709 Posts
    • 18,296 Thanks
    foxgloves
    • #2
    • 13th Dec 12, 11:19 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Dec 12, 11:19 AM
    I love my old pair of purple Dr Martens, which I've had for 12 years & still wear them. I've never had a problem driving in them, even when they were brand new. It might be just a case of getting used to them, but I appreciate you wanting to feel in control of the pedals when driving.
    • timbo58
    • By timbo58 13th Dec 12, 11:21 AM
    • 1,131 Posts
    • 1,178 Thanks
    timbo58
    • #3
    • 13th Dec 12, 11:21 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Dec 12, 11:21 AM
    New boots will be stiff at first -keep polishing them with a high quality boot polish, they'll soon be far better.
    • VJsmum
    • By VJsmum 13th Dec 12, 11:25 AM
    • 4,847 Posts
    • 69,848 Thanks
    VJsmum
    • #4
    • 13th Dec 12, 11:25 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Dec 12, 11:25 AM
    My DD has some new DMs that have ripped her feet to shreds. At the moment she is refusing to wear them and I am refusing to buy her anything else until she agrees to wear them in. I wear them intermittently to try to help wearing them in but she is 2 shoe sizes bigger than me.

    I read the best way is to wee in them and then wear them till they are dry! I have also heard of soaking them in water with a tiny amount of bleach and then wearing them till they are dry.
    You're out with a friend in the capital, I'm a thousand leagues under the sea
    You're hovering worriedly over your eggs, And I'm pondering trees
    I'm wandering long, And I'm pondering trees
    For you and me
    Guy Garvey
    • nuatha
    • By nuatha 13th Dec 12, 12:29 PM
    • 1,921 Posts
    • 23,647 Thanks
    nuatha
    • #5
    • 13th Dec 12, 12:29 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Dec 12, 12:29 PM
    My process for breaking in walking boots is to wear them around the house, including pleanty of trips up and down stairs. Start of with 30 mins at a time twice a day and build up from there. After about a week I dig over a stretch of garden, clean the boots then brush dubbin into the leather (rumour mill is that dubbin rots the stitches, a lot of my walking is in peat hag, I've never had a problem) for dress boots I use Brasher conditioning cream, dry the boots over night (not in front of a fire or radiator) then do a two to three hour walk that involves plenty of water - walking through streams or puddles. Repeat the clean and dry process. It generally takes me two weeks to break new boots in (or break my feet into new boots, not sure which way round it actually works )

    Either dubbin or conditioning cream will help make the leather a little more supple, but its actually using the boots that will help stretch them where you need them to be more flexible.

    As Foxgloves has said, it may be a case of getting used to them (they aren't ever going to give the same sense of feel as a light pair of soft shoes). It may also be worth playing with how you lace them, adjusting the tension at the top of the foot, bottom of the ankle.

    It may also depend on the car, I usually wear very light flexible shoes. I was quite surprised when I realised I couldn't drive my OH's car in boots - my boots are physically too wide to only fit on a single pedal without catching the adjacent pedal(s)

    HTH
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 13th Dec 12, 1:13 PM
    • 2,897 Posts
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    tori.k
    • #6
    • 13th Dec 12, 1:13 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Dec 12, 1:13 PM
    just drive in a pair of trainers then swap shoes before you get out of the car, i drive in boots as the norm, but i do have a well worn in pair that the soles are just to thick to really drive in and i can't really feel the pedals well enough, i just swap shoes if im wearing these.
    • Hermia
    • By Hermia 13th Dec 12, 5:17 PM
    • 4,114 Posts
    • 11,074 Thanks
    Hermia
    • #7
    • 13th Dec 12, 5:17 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Dec 12, 5:17 PM
    It may also depend on the car, I usually wear very light flexible shoes. I was quite surprised when I realised I couldn't drive my OH's car in boots - my boots are physically too wide to only fit on a single pedal without catching the adjacent pedal(s)

    HTH
    Originally posted by nuatha
    Same here. My car's pedals are narrow and close to each other so bulky boots would be quite dangerous. Personally I like to feel the pedal through my shoe when I am driving as it feels safer.

    When I had Doc Martens as a teen we were advised to cover them with vaseline and then wipe it off the next morning to soften them up. I'm not sure if this is advised now!
    • meritaten
    • By meritaten 13th Dec 12, 7:16 PM
    • 23,095 Posts
    • 60,822 Thanks
    meritaten
    • #8
    • 13th Dec 12, 7:16 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Dec 12, 7:16 PM
    a tip for your DD VJsmum - tell her to wear a pair of thin socks or popsocks under some thicker socks when wearing the boots. The two layers of sock rub against each other rather than rubbing the skin.
    • geri1965
    • By geri1965 13th Dec 12, 7:19 PM
    • 8,366 Posts
    • 14,004 Thanks
    geri1965
    • #9
    • 13th Dec 12, 7:19 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Dec 12, 7:19 PM
    Get rid of them and buy something that doesn't need wearing in.

    Life is too short to have uncomfortable feet.
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 13th Dec 12, 7:47 PM
    • 15,516 Posts
    • 126,470 Thanks
    JackieO
    My youngest DD in the summer drive without shoes on at all and has done for 24 years and never has had an accident,in the winter when its cold she takes a pair of soft slippers in the car which she keeps in there to wear just to keep her feet warm
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus.
    • muckybutt
    • By muckybutt 13th Dec 12, 7:57 PM
    • 3,618 Posts
    • 3,419 Thanks
    muckybutt
    Ive had many dm's I always use neats foot oil a good generous covering of it at night - wipe off and polish in the morning.

    If you are finding that the heels start to rub then a couple of layers of duct tape up the back on the inside - less friction on the duct tape so makes wearing them a lot more comfy, if needed I also added some of the plaster strip you can cut off to what ever length you needed....gives it a bit morepadding.

    Urine does help but then theres a stale sweaty wee smell....not nice ! not so bad if you are in the army and in the battle field.

    As for any blisters etc that you may get, I used the compeed blister plasters....excellent I have to say. Once healed apply some surgical spirit to harden the skin, dont get it in any cuts....I once told my bro to put some on a neat blister he had from wearing dm's..... I heard the scream downstairs followed by lots of colourful language fancy trusting your brother
    You may click thanks if you found my advice useful
    • mooomin
    • By mooomin 13th Dec 12, 9:21 PM
    • 13,655 Posts
    • 134,514 Thanks
    mooomin
    My DD has some new DMs that have ripped her feet to shreds. At the moment she is refusing to wear them and I am refusing to buy her anything else until she agrees to wear them in. I wear them intermittently to try to help wearing them in but she is 2 shoe sizes bigger than me.
    Originally posted by VJsmum
    I got my first pair of DMs at 16 and wore them for the first time at an all day festival. I have never experienced pain/blisters like it.

    Tell DD that it DOES get better and that once they are broken in (thick socks and plasters on the ankles much easier than wee ) they will be the best shoes she ever owned. Mine finally died this year after 15 years.
  • kittiej
    I've got a pair of reinforced toe DM's and have had this pair for about 8 years now and wear them as my main form of footwear.

    I don't have any trouble driving in them but seeing as though the boots I had before these were German para boots they are positively dainty

    They do take a bit of breaking in but once you've got them to fit you then they are fab.

    Perseverance I'm afraid.
    Sealed pot challenge member number 18
    Karma - the consequences of ones acts.
    "It's OK to falter otherwise how will you know what success feels like?"
    1 debt v 100 days £2000
    • avogadro
    • By avogadro 14th Dec 12, 11:03 AM
    • 3,645 Posts
    • 6,300 Thanks
    avogadro
    It may also depend on the car, I usually wear very light flexible shoes. I was quite surprised when I realised I couldn't drive my OH's car in boots - my boots are physically too wide to only fit on a single pedal without catching the adjacent pedal(s)

    HTH
    Originally posted by nuatha
    This sounds like the most likely scenario. My dad always wore DMs and he never had a problem driving, even when they were new.
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