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    • InsideInsurance
    • By InsideInsurance 27th Nov 12, 3:26 PM
    • 22,236 Posts
    • 11,387 Thanks
    InsideInsurance
    • #2
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:26 PM
    • #2
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:26 PM
    What level of job are you going for?

    Obviously would really need to see them in the flesh, so to speak, but in general I'd try to avoid them. For a call centre staff, PA, administrator etc then you can get away with it. I would argue less so for a "professional" role.

    Search on here though as lots ask the question and everyone chips in with their pennies worth
    • Lucy Lastic
    • By Lucy Lastic 27th Nov 12, 3:28 PM
    • 689 Posts
    • 964 Thanks
    Lucy Lastic
    • #3
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:28 PM
    • #3
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:28 PM
    Yes!

    (Sorry, less than 10 characters.)
    • cte1111
    • By cte1111 27th Nov 12, 3:33 PM
    • 6,488 Posts
    • 316,797 Thanks
    cte1111
    • #4
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:33 PM
    • #4
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:33 PM
    Some people might see them as inappropriate, so best to avoid. In general, a pair of black flat shoes are pretty useful and don't have to cost a fortune. I'd try and buy or borrow some for the interview.

    My friend worked in a shop years ago and when a lady came in asking about a job, the prospective employer decided she wasn't suitable based on her footwear. So little things like this can make a difference, they probably shouldn't but just in case

    I would try and invest in a pair of interview shoes. They will be useful too, when you get a job, which fingers crossed could be very soon.
    • thehappybutterfly
    • By thehappybutterfly 27th Nov 12, 3:40 PM
    • 1,903 Posts
    • 6,109 Thanks
    thehappybutterfly
    • #5
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:40 PM
    • #5
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:40 PM
    I think they'd be alright with thick black tights. Gone are the days of sober suit and sensible heels, especially if you don't wear them all the time. Far better to be relaxed in your clothes than feeling like you've overdone it. I've interviewed dozens of people and I'm happy to see someone in a dress and heels. That's what I wear as the interviewer as I don't own a suit!
  • brokeinwales
    • #6
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:47 PM
    • #6
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:47 PM
    It's for an admin role, but not a secretarial one, if you know the kind of thing I mean - so with responsibility but not "professional" as such.

    I do wear the boots in my current job a lot, and many other women wear similar. My general instinct is that they'll be OK, but just wondered if there's one of those unwritten "you must never do this!" rules about boots and I'll be making a terrible faux pas. (Personally I think wearing boots in winter is a very sensible thing to do and would therefore reflect well on someone - but then, I'm not the one interviewing!)
    • InsideInsurance
    • By InsideInsurance 27th Nov 12, 3:49 PM
    • 22,236 Posts
    • 11,387 Thanks
    InsideInsurance
    • #7
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:49 PM
    • #7
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:49 PM
    I'd say they arent the best choice but unlikely to cost you the job
  • ILW
    • #8
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:55 PM
    • #8
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:55 PM
    I would say only if you cover them with trousers. That is unless you are a woman.
    • victoria61
    • By victoria61 27th Nov 12, 3:57 PM
    • 226 Posts
    • 364 Thanks
    victoria61
    • #9
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:57 PM
    • #9
    • 27th Nov 12, 3:57 PM
    I think you'd be fine - boots and a dress/skirt can look really smart. I have to dress professionally for my job and I quite often wear boots - I have about 10 pairs! I've interviewed loads of people and it certainly wouldn't have any kind of negative impact on me.
    I did once interview someone for a receptionist job at a doctor's surgery and she turned up in flip flops with her purse in her hand! She looked like she was just popping out to the shops! (she didn't get the job)
    • Dollardog
    • By Dollardog 27th Nov 12, 4:07 PM
    • 1,693 Posts
    • 2,860 Thanks
    Dollardog
    I'm going to go against the trend here and say that I think bearing in mind the weather at the moment, as long as they are smart, I can't see a problem, even for a professional job. Especially with a knee length skirt.
    Hope you get the job!!
    • Ivrytwr3
    • By Ivrytwr3 27th Nov 12, 4:12 PM
    • 5,335 Posts
    • 9,522 Thanks
    Ivrytwr3
    If you really want the job then i suggest this outfit:





  • brokeinwales
    Bit cold for that kind of thing.
    • runninglea
    • By runninglea 27th Nov 12, 4:29 PM
    • 772 Posts
    • 1,100 Thanks
    runninglea
    If you really want the job then i suggest this outfit:




    Originally posted by Ivrytwr3
    No boots here though!!
    Year 2016 (5100/17068mortgage repayment)Overall mortgage (27,200/165568) (16.5%) (16/100) payments made. Total paid 2016 year 5,100
    Total paid 2016 year 5,100
    • Okydoky25
    • By Okydoky25 27th Nov 12, 4:40 PM
    • 970 Posts
    • 842 Thanks
    Okydoky25
    I'd say they will be fine. My mum used to work in employment and said the only footwear to put her off a good candidate was open toed shoes
  • SUESMITH
    fine, boots can look really smart.

    one of our senior people used to come to work in flip flops and strappy tops which were not appropriate business wear and i can't believe she got away with it
    'We're not here for a long time, we're here for a good time
    • Goldiegirl
    • By Goldiegirl 27th Nov 12, 8:49 PM
    • 8,233 Posts
    • 46,654 Thanks
    Goldiegirl
    I can't see any problem, with the weather we've been having it seems a sensible choice to me
    • keyser666
    • By keyser666 28th Nov 12, 12:55 AM
    • 2,055 Posts
    • 1,571 Thanks
    keyser666
    Yes!

    (Sorry, less than 10 characters.)
    Originally posted by Lucy Lastic
    To get around the less than 10 characters type in your answer and press the spacebar at least 10 times and then press the full stop key
    • keyser666
    • By keyser666 28th Nov 12, 12:56 AM
    • 2,055 Posts
    • 1,571 Thanks
    keyser666
    Yes .
    • cr1mson
    • By cr1mson 28th Nov 12, 8:13 AM
    • 661 Posts
    • 485 Thanks
    cr1mson
    If you are uncomfortable you could always change them nearer the interview venue.

    Although personally I don't see what the problem is. I used to wear boots all the time in my professional life pre kids and my job used to involve dealing with various high heid.

    Although not with members of the public and wouldn't have been able to have done it had it I don't think.
    • tonyh66
    • By tonyh66 28th Nov 12, 8:35 AM
    • 774 Posts
    • 562 Thanks
    tonyh66
    Smart black ones with a low heel - not tarty or casual. I know it's going to be wet out and they're the only things I have that are both smart and weather appropriate (and I can't walk in heels!) - I'd be wearing them with a smart almost-knee-length dress, tights and a blazer.
    Originally posted by brokeinwales
    sounds a bit piratey to me argghhhh.
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