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Real-life MMD: Whose glitch is it anyway?
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# 61
milvusvestal
Old 18-10-2012, 5:23 PM
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Default Foreign currency

It would be entirely dishonest if you were to keep the money, and worse for your friend to do so, and profit from what sounds like a genuine administrative mistake. (Yes, the dealing rooms make a good "turn" on currency deals, but that isn't the point here, is it?).

Contact the firm that supplied the currency, and tell them what's happened. They'll follow it up and, you never know, your friend's bank account might suddenly become overdrawn without warning and incur bank charges. Serve him/her right.
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# 62
Torry Quine
Old 18-10-2012, 6:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronangel View Post
Bet you would not if he offered to pay you half....
This is easy for you to say but what about people with very little money?
anyway its not your problem its his they may ask him or take money when it shows up missing on their acounts, and it all depends if you want to keep him as a friend or have him help you again.
I would actually. I don't have much money but no matter how little I will always be honest.

I wouldn't want to keep him as a friend if that meant going against my principles. They had the money to pay for the currency so could obviously afford it.
But when the fullness of the time came, God sent forth His Son, born of a woman, born under the Law. Gal 4:4

"When the day shall come, that we do part," he said softly, and turned to look at me, "if my last words are not 'I love you'--- ye'll ken it was because I didna have time." (Diana Gabaldon- Fiery Cross)
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# 63
ronangel
Old 18-10-2012, 6:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Torry Quine View Post
I would actually. I don't have much money but no matter how little I will always be honest.
.
You are not being dishonest you paid him the money. what happened to it after that is not your concern. he did not have to tell you and can make up his own mind what to do. only time will tell if he has to pay it back, and did nothing dishonest or with any sort of intent to defraud. I see it as a long or short term interest free loan from the company, not a person which would be a different matter and mistake should be pointed out. The persons job would not be at risk if they were competent as they could trace back where the mistake was made without personal loss, as this was a banking not cash transaction, and reclaim the money.
The richard montgomery matter

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# 64
Torry Quine
Old 18-10-2012, 6:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronangel View Post
You are not being dishonest you paid him the money. what happened to it after that is not your concern. he did not have to tell you and can make up his own mind what to do. only time will tell if he has to pay it back, and did nothing dishonest or with any sort of intent to defraud. I see it as a long or short term interest free loan from the company, not a person which would be a different matter and mistake should be pointed out. The persons job would not be at risk if they were competent as they could trace back where the mistake was made without personal loss, as this was a banking not cash transaction, and reclaim the money.
You said that my opinion would be different were I to be offered half and that would be dishonest.

I agree that what the friend does is up to him but the OP seems to think they are entitled to some of it
But when the fullness of the time came, God sent forth His Son, born of a woman, born under the Law. Gal 4:4

"When the day shall come, that we do part," he said softly, and turned to look at me, "if my last words are not 'I love you'--- ye'll ken it was because I didna have time." (Diana Gabaldon- Fiery Cross)
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# 65
rojanich
Old 18-10-2012, 6:40 PM
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Default Spot on answer !

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambro View Post
Wow, I really can't believe the responses in this thread. In order to answer the actual question (what should the OP do): Nothing

Here is the situation:
You purchased 200 worth of Euro's from your friend at cost price (no admin fee etc)
They provided the 200 worth of Euro's
Your transaction is finished, you have what you paid for at the price you agreed on beneficial terms to yourself.

My opinion: Be glad for what you got and don't go causing trouble behind your friends back when they were doing you a favour. You seem like a greedy individual even asking the question.

As to the situation regarding the friend (not actually asked):
Your friend purchased 200 worth of Euros from the BDC
The BDC provided the agreed sum of Euros but have not as yet demanded the cash (apparently in error)
Your friend now has a moral (and possibly legal) obligation to make the BDC aware of the error and pay the funds

My opinion: Whilst I feel they should contact the BDC I would expect the majority of people to keep hush about the money and hope it is not reclaimed. Whilst I would be disappointed if someone did this I would neither be surprised or find it outrageous. Certainly not worthy of ending a friendship over, especially a friend who is willing to help you out with no strings attached when you need it.
As the title says - spot on answer. I also bet your friend now wishes he hadn't told you. It really is his moral dilema and if you now 'grass him up' after already asking for the money back from him you're not much of a friend to him and also on dodgy moral ground.
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# 66
VicHG
Old 18-10-2012, 6:51 PM
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As someone who works dealing with currency, given this could mean someone loosing their job/or replacing it from their wages (for a possible genuine mistake) personally I think you should tell him to own up, would he appreciate the bank just taking 400 out because the transaction went through twice?! No, so why keep it?

In terms of your money it really isn't yours as you should have currency in its place and if he never mentioned it in the first place, it would never have been something you would be dealing with.
I would suggest you either grass him in if it would make you feel better (which given you've asked peoples opinions it probably would do) or get over it!
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# 67
tichtich
Old 19-10-2012, 11:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inverness View Post
Keeping the bureau's money, mistakenly left in the friend's account, is a criminal offence under the Theft Act 1968.
Are you sure? I'm no lawyer, but I would find it surprising if we have a legal obligation to remind a payee to collect payment.

BTW I was once in the position of being sent two cheques for the same amount I was supposed to receive (from a government body). It was a large amount (nearly 10,000) and I was sorely tempted to pay both cheques into my account. But in the end I sent one back. I'm not sure whether it was moral considerations or fear of the law that played the larger part in my decision. I don't even know whether I would have been committing any crime. Is it an offence to accept money that you've been sent in error? Anyway, I was a bit miffed that I didn't even receive a "thank you" in reply!

P.S. Forgot to mention I had another such case recently, when I moved into a flat where the electricity meter had never been registered, so electricity was not being billed for. If I'd done nothing about it I'd probably still be getting free electricity. I decided to do the honest thing, but you can't believe how much effort it was to get someone to start billing me!

P.P.S. On re-reading my first paragraph, I'm having second thoughts. It seems plausible that, if you've entered into a transaction, you have a legal obligation to make sure your side of the transaction (your payment in this case) is completed. Still, I would think that failure to do so would be a breach of contract, and not theft. But I'm not a lawyer, so what do I know?

Last edited by tichtich; 19-10-2012 at 12:14 PM.
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# 68
lolodawn3
Old 20-10-2012, 8:31 AM
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I was given an extra 100 by the girl in my bank, the one I use every week, which I took back the following week. She was so delighted and thankful because, as she explained, everything she had done since had been scrutinised and a black mark had been lodged against her trustworthyness. It was only(!) 100 to me but it meant so much more to her and yes - I did feel good.
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# 69
ronangel
Old 20-10-2012, 2:19 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lolodawn3 View Post
I was given an extra 100 by the girl in my bank, the one I use every week, which I took back the following week. She was so delighted and thankful because, as she explained, everything she had done since had been scrutinised and a black mark had been lodged against her trustworthyness. It was only(!) 100 to me but it meant so much more to her and yes - I did feel good.
Completely different situation and 100% correct thing to do as personal contact.
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# 70
StaffsSW
Old 20-10-2012, 2:22 PM
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The clear line between thrift and theft is seemingly unknown on this site, and it is intentionally blurred by those that should know better.

Morals and moneysaving it seems are mutually exclusive.
<--- Nothing to see here - move along --->
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# 71
pjfromuk
Old 22-10-2012, 6:05 AM
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No wonder our society is going down the drain! The money is not theirs to argue about and keeping it is a criminal offence!

Such a sad indictment that so many in the forum think it is OK to keep it!
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# 72
ronangel
Old 22-10-2012, 7:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjfromuk View Post
No wonder our society is going down the drain! The money is not theirs to argue about and keeping it is a criminal offence!

Such a sad indictment that so many in the forum think it is OK to keep it!
This is just like that old quiz show where the audience shout take the money, open the box!
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# 73
JayD
Old 24-10-2012, 9:47 AM
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You expected to pay 200 for your Euros, you gave your friend 200 and they gave you your Euros. You had what you wanted, you are not out of pocket and more importantly you have done nothing wrong.

Whatever dishonest activity your friend wants to get involved in is their problem. I am sure it wont go unnoticed forever and the bureau de change will soon be claiming what they are due from your friend's bank.

Don't get involved and don't upset your friendship over something that you know is morally wrong and is most likely to be sorted soon anyway - and don't rat on your friend either.

If it is never sorted then, so what - you are still no worse off and have a clear conscience too.
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# 74
qetu1357
Old 07-11-2012, 9:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StaffsSW View Post
The clear line between thrift and theft is seemingly unknown on this site, and it is intentionally blurred by those that should know better.

Morals and moneysaving it seems are mutually exclusive.
Never a truer word said............
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# 75
seven-day-weekend
Old 09-11-2012, 7:32 AM
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I would ring the bureau and inform them of their mistake. Then the money would have to stay in the friend's bank account so that the bureau could take it.
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