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  • FIRST POST
    Former MSE Debs
    Real-life MMD: Whose glitch is it anyway?
    • #1
    • 15th Oct 12, 11:40 AM
    Real-life MMD: Whose glitch is it anyway? 15th Oct 12 at 11:40 AM
    Money Moral Dilemma: Whose glitch is it anyway?


    My friend agreed to get me some currency for our holiday, so I transferred him the £200. When we got back, he found he had £200 extra in his account as the bureau mistakenly didn't charg him for my euros. I asked him for the cash back, but he said it was rightfully his. Should I ask for it back, confess to the foreign exchange or let him keep it?


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    Note: Please remember that these are real-life Money Moral Dilemmas and while we want you to have your say, please remember to be nice when you respond.


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    Last edited by Former MSE Debs; 16-10-2012 at 6:02 PM.
Page 2
  • Dannybob
    What has the world come to?
    Amazes me how many dishonest people there are on this thread. The money isn't yours. Neither is it your friend's. Please give it back and give a us all a glimmer of hope that there is at least some understanding of community and fairness in the world. What are the possible repercussions of keeping it? Someone could lose their job!

    A friend of mine recently transferred £500 to my account by accident (he'd just transferred some money to me for something else and forgot to change the recipient details). Should I have kept that? Of course not...
    • purple.sarah
    • By purple.sarah 17th Oct 12, 9:09 AM
    • 2,390 Posts
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    purple.sarah
    The money isn't yours or your friend's to keep. It was a mistake and that might catch up with him. If you got the euros you paid for then you are not out of pocket, you are just trying to get something for nothing. I would give it back.
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    • Inverness
    • By Inverness 17th Oct 12, 9:28 AM
    • 262 Posts
    • 231 Thanks
    Inverness
    I'd ask for the money back and get a new friend!!
    Originally posted by Cimscate
    It's not yours either, you had the euros instead.
  • blainestewart
    some of these responses make me p*ss!

    split half and half all day long. if someone chases the money down the line, deal with it then
  • DustD
    Those people saying 'you got the EUR200 you paid for' are missing the point. And I don't get this 'go halves' business either. Why?

    Say I gave my friend a £1 to get some milk for me while they were shopping. They come back with the milk, but then explain they weren't charged for it but they are going to keep the money anyway. Or they say heres 50p... I wouldn't be happy with that.

    The real question isn't whether or not you should get something for free - its should your friend profit out of the situation?

    This MMD isn't as black and white and the scenario described above, as quite rightly people have mentioned theres a fair chance the Bureau will realise their mistake and debit his account at some point, which would mean -£200 to him which isn't fair.

    I think the money should technically go back to the OP, as I don't see why the friend should profit. But the only solution can be to inform the Bureau and get them to take the cash.

    Explain to him, what if say in a few months, his account only has £150 in it, the Bureau finally make the debit, forcing him to go overdrawn? What then?
  • Rave Knave
    200 Euros
    The question is, who does the money belong to, and if the Bank didn't collect the money from the euro transaction, then it still belongs to them. It's quite simple really.
    • oldtrout
    • By oldtrout 17th Oct 12, 10:13 AM
    • 121 Posts
    • 167 Thanks
    oldtrout
    Probably best to leave it as a matter between your friend and the bureau. If your friend hadn't told you, you would be none the wiser and therefore would not have this 'dilemma'.
    • Dan Thunder
    • By Dan Thunder 17th Oct 12, 10:34 AM
    • 416 Posts
    • 608 Thanks
    Dan Thunder
    Unless I've misread the original post it sounds like the OP is saying that they got their friend to buy the currency for their holiday but yet they expect this friend to pay full whack for all theirs whilst the OP pays nothing and basically gets free money. If that's true it makes you wonder who's the poor friend?

    As others have said, they gave the friend £200 for the equivalent currency, which they got. If his bank made a mistake somewhere along the line then it's arguable that as they're the account holder they should be the one to benefit.

    Personally I'd split it 50:50 on the condition that if the bank asks for it back then the OP pays half. If I've read it right then to my mind that's the absolute most they're entitled to.
    • pennypinchUK
    • By pennypinchUK 17th Oct 12, 10:56 AM
    • 382 Posts
    • 732 Thanks
    pennypinchUK
    Wow, if he's a friend I'd hate to meet your enemies....never mind the £200, dump the friend and move on. Quick.
  • janexxx
    His account his money his problem when they catch up with him !
    You have a problem if you have to ask others to answer this for you
    • JimmyTheWig
    • By JimmyTheWig 17th Oct 12, 11:11 AM
    • 11,255 Posts
    • 10,990 Thanks
    JimmyTheWig
    split half and half all day long. if someone chases the money down the line, deal with it then
    Originally posted by blainestewart
    Trouble is, even good friendships can come and go.
    If the bank realise the mistake 18 months down the line it is the friend who is going to have to cough up for it. Might then be difficult getting the other half back from the OP.
    • janiebquick
    • By janiebquick 17th Oct 12, 11:29 AM
    • 397 Posts
    • 494 Thanks
    janiebquick
    You got your euros and there is every chance that the bureau will realise their mistake and debit your friend's account, so the matter is out of your hands. Next time, buy your own euros.
  • A.Jones
    Those people saying 'you got the EUR200 you paid for' are missing the point. And I don't get this 'go halves' business either. Why?

    Say I gave my friend a £1 to get some milk for me while they were shopping. They come back with the milk, but then explain they weren't charged for it but they are going to keep the money anyway. Or they say heres 50p... I wouldn't be happy with that.
    Originally posted by DustD
    The friend could also say "I got free milk, and I'm keeping it as it was free. You can go and get your own."

    This MMD isn't as black and white and the scenario described above, as quite rightly people have mentioned theres a fair chance the Bureau will realise their mistake and debit his account at some point, which would mean -£200 to him which isn't fair.

    I think the money should technically go back to the OP, as I don't see why the friend should profit.
    Originally posted by DustD
    If the friend shouldn't profit, after doing the work getting the currency, then why should the OP profit?
    • VincentVega
    • By VincentVega 17th Oct 12, 12:05 PM
    • 201 Posts
    • 123 Thanks
    VincentVega
    It's his money.... It's his account and he did you a favour.
    Why didn't you do it yourself? You're only jealous because he was lucky to get the glitch.... Get over it!!
    Originally posted by Fatabelly
    Ah, the old "jealous" line. I was wondering when that would rear its ugly head. It's such an unoriginal, lazy and hackneyed argument, totally without evidence (unless you're a mind reader), and displays a complete lack of originality.

    If someone doesn't like the things you like, do you label them "haters" as well?

    (In answer to the original question, it's not your money, it's not your friend's money. If they insist on keeping it, grass them up.)
  • djb77
    Should you have your £200s back? No. Should your friend keep the £200s? Not really, they should go back to the Exchange Bureau and mention that it had not been debited out of their bank account.

    If it turns out the Exchange Bureau have their money and the glitch has happen elsewhere as I have known this to have happened before (as one party had their money and the other party still had theirs). Then it is up to your friend to decide what they do with – split it, keep it, give it to charity, etc, etc

    I know it does not mention this but surely the friend got their money exchanged at the same time. If so, how come their money had been debited from their account as surely they would have got it altogether in one sale. If this is the case then is the extra £200 in your friend’s account actually for the Euros not being charged?
  • magentalady
    I don't see how either of you could feel comfortable keeping or spending money that wasn't yours, and which you might be asked to give back some day.

    The money doesn't rightfully belong to either of you, so you can squabble over it all you want but I think you both know that neither of you really has a claim to it.

    The only thing to do is contact the bureau and explain it. There's a chance that they'll say they have no record of the transaction and can't be bothered chasing it down, so you can keep the money - and then if you're really good mates you can split the money and spend it with a clean conscience! If your mate insists on keeping the money though, then c'est la vie - you'll still have exactly as much money as you would have had without the glitch, and maybe just one less friend than you thought you had!
  • Avon2001
    What the OP's friend gets is what the court gives them and while there are sentencing guidelines, how they are interpreted can vary widely. There was a college student with no criminal record recently jailed for 6 months for stealing a £3.50 bottle of water during the riots and before that there was a woman jailed for 6 months for stealing a bottle of milk because she had no money and was desperate.

    I'd also point out that a criminal record can have a serious impact, particularly if it relates to theft/fraud. Unless your friend never needs to look for a new job or get credit, they may live to regret this.

    Sooner or later the BDC is going to work this out and go chasing the money so frankly I'd suggest to the friend that they contact the BDC and pay up and then get a new friend.
    Last edited by MSE ForumTeam3; 17-10-2012 at 4:13 PM. Reason: Quoting deleted post
  • jaydub83
    I had a similar situation happen about four years ago: British Gas came to do some work and I sent them a cheque for nearly £600 for the work but they didn't cash it. I called them two or three times telling them that I hadn't paid yet and on the last occasion, the girl I spoke to told me that if I didn't have the invoice number (which I didn't) then they couldn't look into to see what the problem was with taking payment. I suggested she could find the invoice number by checking the works done on my account and tracking that way but whether too lazy or just inept, she didn't do it. Four+ years later, I still have the money sitting in savings in case they come looking for it at some point (although this looks increasingly unlikely). My understanding is that they have six years to come for the money after which it's mine.

    I think that your friend ought to contact the exchange and make reasonable attempts to pay for the goods and, if unsuccessful in paying, keep the money on ice in case they come for it in future. I definitely don't think it's the OPs to have back.
    • susan47
    • By susan47 17th Oct 12, 1:36 PM
    • 60 Posts
    • 23 Thanks
    susan47
    Keep looking over your shoulder!
    No way should your friend give you the £200 back as you got what you paid for. As for your friend, I'd be worried if I were him. How can he relax knowing that the £200 doesn't belong to him and it could be taken away at any moment? They might even charge him interest if they figure he's done it deliberately, who knows! I certainly hope he doesn't spend it anyway or he could end up with a sudden unexpected overdraft. Normally they spot their mistakes and come looking for accidents like this...
    • Elisecas
    • By Elisecas 17th Oct 12, 2:25 PM
    • 39 Posts
    • 80 Thanks
    Elisecas
    The money doesn't belong to either of you. You got what you paid for. If he spends the money and the company bill him later well, more fool him. If he keeps the money then it's his liabilty/conscience. You got what you paid for, let it go.
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