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CV for 15 year old
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# 1
wantnomoneyworries
Old 20-08-2012, 6:58 PM
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Default CV for 15 year old

My daughter is going to start looking for part time work (weekends as she is still at school) and is not sure what to put in her CV. Here is what she has done so far.....

DOB **/**/****
Personal Statement
I am a quick learner and enjoy working as part of a team. I am friendly and reliable. I enjoy meeting new people and am a respectful person. I enjoy hard work and am always helpful. I can take instruction, but also am self motivated and can use my own initiative.
Education
2008-present ................ School, ...............
Qualifications
• Speech and Drama – level 1,2 and 3 merit,merit,distinction
• Sports Leader qualification
GCSE’s to date (predicted or modules taken)
• Maths A
• English Language A and B
• English Literature A
• Science A*
• Religious Studies A
• Dance B
• P.E. A*
• French A
• Geography A
• I.T.
Currently
I am currently studying for my full GCSE’s, but have completed some modules already. I am also working towards the Duke of Edinburgh Bronze award.
Work Experience
Y10 – 2 weeks at ********** Primary School working with the Nursery class helping children with work, preparing for lessons, photocopying and filing.
Interests
I volunteer for a local Rainbows group, which involves interaction with girls aged 5-7. It is hard work but enjoyable. I enjoy lots of sports and have represented my school in both netball and hockey teams. I really enjoy dancing. I attend tap and ballet dancing lessons. I find it’s a great way to be part of a team, meet people and learn new skills, as well as a great way to keep healthy. I enjoy socialising with friends. I love music and enjoy attending concerts.


We would appreciate any feedback. Thanks
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# 2
gibson123
Old 20-08-2012, 7:27 PM
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I think that is a really good attempt and exactly right for a general CV for a new entrant, keep it is a basis and adapt t0 the organisation.

e.g. for John Lewis - I would like to work for John Lewis as I am interested in retail and would enjoy interacting with your customers

Pets at Home - I love animals and I am a caring person, who is not scared of hard work and happy to clean up after pets.

I am sure you get the drift
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# 3
kitschkitty
Old 20-08-2012, 7:36 PM
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It's a very difficult one as most of those statements are a no no for adults CV, but a CV for a child is going to have very little you can put in it.

That said I would have thought most employers who would be willing to employ a 15yo wouldn't have jobs available where a CV would be necessary or much help.

I think we need parents of 15yo's with jobs to give really helpful advice.
A waist is a terrible thing to mind.
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# 4
wantnomoneyworries
Old 20-08-2012, 8:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gibson123 View Post
I think that is a really good attempt and exactly right for a general CV for a new entrant, keep it is a basis and adapt t0 the organisation.

e.g. for John Lewis - I would like to work for John Lewis as I am interested in retail and would enjoy interacting with your customers

Pets at Home - I love animals and I am a caring person, who is not scared of hard work and happy to clean up after pets.

I am sure you get the drift
O yes that's a great idea!! thanks
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# 5
wantnomoneyworries
Old 20-08-2012, 8:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitschkitty View Post
It's a very difficult one as most of those statements are a no no for adults CV, but a CV for a child is going to have very little you can put in it.

That said I would have thought most employers who would be willing to employ a 15yo wouldn't have jobs available where a CV would be necessary or much help.

I think we need parents of 15yo's with jobs to give really helpful advice.
I know what you mean. There is a village full of restaurants near where we live so I think one idea will be to hand the CV in on the off chance
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# 6
MissSarah1972
Old 20-08-2012, 8:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wantnomoneyworries View Post
I know what you mean. There is a village full of restaurants near where we live so I think one idea will be to hand the CV in on the off chance
Or they may just have an application form that they can give her to fill in. Many many moons ago when I got a Saturday job I just got application forms.
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# 7
kingfisherblue
Old 20-08-2012, 8:48 PM
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You might want to add that rainbows is a section of GirlGuidingUK - many employers won't know this, but they will know that GGUK is a respected organisation. Your daughter could also give examples of how her skills learned from voluntary work can be transferred to the workplace.

Good luck to your daughter OP x
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# 8
wantnomoneyworries
Old 20-08-2012, 9:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingfisherblue View Post
You might want to add that rainbows is a section of GirlGuidingUK - many employers won't know this, but they will know that GGUK is a respected organisation. Your daughter could also give examples of how her skills learned from voluntary work can be transferred to the workplace.

Good luck to your daughter OP x
Thanks very much - that didn't occur to me!
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# 9
faded_flowers
Old 20-08-2012, 10:52 PM
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I'd say that make sure she hands her CVs in, not a parent. So many parents ask to see the manager etc. on behalf of the child, it gives the impression that the child then lacks confidence (essential in retail) and/or isn't very interested
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# 10
westv
Old 21-08-2012, 8:33 AM
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Has the job market become that competitive now that children now have to have CVs for simple Saturday jobs?!
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# 11
kingfisherblue
Old 21-08-2012, 8:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westv View Post
Has the job market become that competitive now that children now have to have CVs for simple Saturday jobs?!
I handed in CVs when applying for Saturday jobs, and I'm now 43, so it's hardly a new thing to do.

I think it shows that someone is keen, organised and literate. I also think that it gives potential employers a chance to read through the CV and decide whether it is worth interviewing someone or not. It gives more details than a letter, but doesn't take much longer to read.
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# 12
paddyrg
Old 21-08-2012, 9:28 AM
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Good idea - keep the CV short and clear, at 15 nobody expects you to have any experience anyway, and the jobs you might get will be things like glass collecting, washing up, etc where experience helps but are essentially entry level roles. Getting a glass collecting job for instance will mean building public confidence, learning how bars/restaurants/whatever work, maybe learning some cellar skills, all of which will be valuable later in life, or even at 18 when they can legally work the bar!

I had a buddy who was 15 who collected glasses at a holiday park over the summer. He stayed in the industry, when I last met up with him he was turning over over £10M in food and drink at a holiday company...but all based on the skills and experience aged 15, entry level work. The pay may be lousy in adult terms, but without tax and rent, even a couple of quid an hour is a lot aged 15, and it sends all the right messages to later employers if someone has 6 years experience when going head-to-head with a fresh graduate down the line.
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# 13
ringo_24601
Old 21-08-2012, 10:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westv View Post
Has the job market become that competitive now that children now have to have CVs for simple Saturday jobs?!
I also did it at 16, back in '96 and it worked. Even then I had to take a maths and English test to finally get the job!

By 16, I had 2 lots of work experience on my CV (through school, and one arranged through family in the summer holidays). I think it's a great exercise to get a teenager to write a CV out. They should understand that it's not a 'detailed history of your working experience' but a sales sheet designed to get you a job. Every aspect of it should be there to 'sell you'
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# 14
westv
Old 21-08-2012, 10:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ringo_24601 View Post
I also did it at 16, back in '96 and it worked. Even then I had to take a maths and English test to finally get the job!

By 16, I had 2 lots of work experience on my CV (through school, and one arranged through family in the summer holidays). I think it's a great exercise to get a teenager to write a CV out. They should understand that it's not a 'detailed history of your working experience' but a sales sheet designed to get you a job. Every aspect of it should be there to 'sell you'
Well I got my first full time office job at 16 but I never did a CV then - the agency did all the paperwork.

When it came to Saturday jobs I just assumed that school children just turned up and asked if there was anything doing.
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# 15
ACDC1978
Old 21-08-2012, 12:59 PM
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I applied for a job in admin when I was 15, and about to leave school... I took in a 'record of achievement' which contained a selection of certificates I gained from going on various courses, and also contained slips I had been given when I had 100% attendance for a whole term... I was called into the MD's office after my interview - daunting at 15 years old! Turned out they were so impressed with me they decided not to offer me the admin job and I was offered a job in the accounts department! So just goes to show if you can be committed to the job and not a shirker (attendance slips) and also get involved in various activities then you will be a team player! Good luck to her though, I'm sure she'll be fine!
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# 16
ringo_24601
Old 21-08-2012, 2:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westv View Post
Well I got my first full time office job at 16 but I never did a CV then - the agency did all the paperwork.

When it came to Saturday jobs I just assumed that school children just turned up and asked if there was anything doing.
And when there's hundreds of kids doing that, you need a CV.. I've never used an agency to find work before (not to say they don't approach me with work - thanks LinkedIn!)
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# 17
alunharford
Old 21-08-2012, 6:31 PM
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I guess the big question is: why?

Based on those grades, she should be in a good position to get excellent results in her GCSEs/A-levels and move onto a good degree, probably in a science (if that's what she wants to do!)

Because of the way the UCAS system works (universities have to make their decision before A-level results are available) and the removal of all mathematical content from science GCSEs, failing to get an A* in maths is likely (rightly or wrongly) to raise the question of whether she can cope on a science-based degree.

Given her clear academic ability, the priority should be her education/homework rather than making a few quid washing dishes. Getting an A* instead of an A in maths is probably worth a few hundred thousand over the course of her future career.

Still, I'd move the GCSEs up to emphasise them over the other qualifications (which employers are likely to be unfamiliar with). If somebody is looking to employ a 15 year old they are probably not expecting a totally professional CV - this should be fine to get an interview (the wishy-washy wording will make somebody who reads a lot of CVs think she has no experience and hasn't done any 'real work' but that's accurate and expected for a 15 year old).
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# 18
Torry Quine
Old 21-08-2012, 6:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westv View Post
Has the job market become that competitive now that children now have to have CVs for simple Saturday jobs?!

I have to admit to being surprised at a 15 year old child having a CV to apply for Saturday jobs. I din't even know what one was at that age! To me CVs are a very recent thing for non-professional jobs.

I hope she is succesful.
"How many times I have desired to gather your children as a hen that gathers her chicks and you were not willing!” Luke 13:34

"When the day shall come, that we do part," he said softly, and turned to look at me, "if my last words are not 'I love you'--- ye'll ken it was because I didna have time." (Diana Gabaldon- Fiery Cross)
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# 19
zenith1991
Old 21-08-2012, 6:42 PM
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Just a small point, don't use contractions (It's)

Try to write in bullet points, and for the instances where you make claims such as 'hard working', 'team work' say how these can be demonstrated e.g

- I am a hard worker - voluntary work with GGUK
- I enjoy team work - playing in part of a sports team

etc.etc.

Best of luck
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# 20
wantnomoneyworries
Old 21-08-2012, 7:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alunharford View Post
I guess the big question is: why?

Based on those grades, she should be in a good position to get excellent results in her GCSEs/A-levels and move onto a good degree, probably in a science (if that's what she wants to do!)

Because of the way the UCAS system works (universities have to make their decision before A-level results are available) and the removal of all mathematical content from science GCSEs, failing to get an A* in maths is likely (rightly or wrongly) to raise the question of whether she can cope on a science-based degree.

Given her clear academic ability, the priority should be her education/homework rather than making a few quid washing dishes. Getting an A* instead of an A in maths is probably worth a few hundred thousand over the course of her future career.

Still, I'd move the GCSEs up to emphasise them over the other qualifications (which employers are likely to be unfamiliar with). If somebody is looking to employ a 15 year old they are probably not expecting a totally professional CV - this should be fine to get an interview (the wishy-washy wording will make somebody who reads a lot of CVs think she has no experience and hasn't done any 'real work' but that's accurate and expected for a 15 year old).
I do see your point. She does intend to carry on her education and go onto uni. At this moment in time though she has absolutely no idea what she wants to do. It is her decision to try and get some part time work to have her own money so to speak. I think she will gain a lot from working anyway as long as she doesn't have to put it before school work ( we wouldn't allow that anyway) She will probably struggle to get an A* in maths as her class were doing the GCSE a year early, but have found doing it this way that results have dropped. So where she was predicted an A*/A she will probably only get and A, but will be starting AS level maths in year 11 if that makes sense!
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