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  • FIRST POST
    Bexm
    Skirting board heating
    • #1
    • 26th Mar 07, 7:36 PM
    Skirting board heating 26th Mar 07 at 7:36 PM
    Hello!

    I have recently been to a show and seen this seemingly marvellous idea called thermaskirt, which is your heating in your skirting board.

    My new house has no heating what so ever and I'm wondering if anyone has tried this therma skirt stuff and could tell me whether its expensive to run or has any other reviews.
    Our new house is a small, 2 up 2 down, with a small conservatory.

    Thank you in advance

    Bex
Page 1
  • cheghead
    • #2
    • 26th Mar 07, 7:52 PM
    • #2
    • 26th Mar 07, 7:52 PM
    we have a small 2 up 2 down. Have a gas fire in front room and kitchen and use 500w skirting heaters from Argos which we find heat the rooms enough. Much cheaper than getting central heating installed!

    www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/4150145.htm
  • Bexm
    • #3
    • 26th Mar 07, 8:00 PM
    • #3
    • 26th Mar 07, 8:00 PM
    Hi

    Thanks cheghead. That could be an idea, just a few little heaters like that.
    This therma skirt stuff is actual central heating, all plumbed in etc, just instead of radiators, you have skirting boards.

    How much does it cost to run the electric heaters? I know it says 500w, but what does that actually mean? whats the comparison like to say gas central heating (as we have in our rental property)?
  • cheghead
    • #4
    • 26th Mar 07, 8:43 PM
    • #4
    • 26th Mar 07, 8:43 PM
    Hi

    Thanks cheghead. That could be an idea, just a few little heaters like that.
    This therma skirt stuff is actual central heating, all plumbed in etc, just instead of radiators, you have skirting boards.

    How much does it cost to run the electric heaters? I know it says 500w, but what does that actually mean? whats the comparison like to say gas central heating (as we have in our rental property)?
    Originally posted by Bexm
    About 5p/hour to run. As a comparison I suppose you could say if you had central heating installed at say 2000 thats a lot of 5p's. Also you don't need heating in the summer so can always put the heaters away or take them with you if you move. Could connect to timers if you want controlled heat. We find they give enough background heat for a 12 x 12 ft room in the winter.
  • Cardew
    • #5
    • 26th Mar 07, 11:32 PM
    • #5
    • 26th Mar 07, 11:32 PM
    Bear in mind that there is no more expensive way of heating than by using electricity at daytime rates.

    Doesn't matter what type of electrical heating as they all give out the same amount of heat for the same power consumption.
  • dc
    • #6
    • 27th Mar 07, 12:51 AM
    • #6
    • 27th Mar 07, 12:51 AM
    Hello!

    I have recently been to a show and seen this seemingly marvellous idea called thermaskirt, which is your heating in your skirting board.

    My new house has no heating what so ever and I'm wondering if anyone has tried this therma skirt stuff and could tell me whether its expensive to run or has any other reviews.
    Our new house is a small, 2 up 2 down, with a small conservatory.

    Thank you in advance

    Bex
    Originally posted by Bexm
    I have had skirting radiators for 25+ years, very pleased with comfort levels, and they are no more expensive to run than conventional radiators . The advantages are that being a finned pipe running around the external walls they take up little space, and dont prevent furniture being pushed against the walls. They are more convective than radiant and so the heating is more dispersed. We were warned about discolouring of walls but this has never been a problem. The only problem of sorts is that in the living room because of its size, the radiator has to be fitted to two walls to get the required heat output.
    If I had to do it again I probably would, after comparing it to underfloor heating, and checking that it is OK with condensing boilers. Condensing boilers require a much lower return water temp to operate in condensing mode, ie at highest efficiency. Skirting heating by nature is just a finned pipe run around the house perimeter, so very little restriction on flow will mean that the pump will have to run slowly or be restricted to achieve this.

    HTHs dc
    ac's lovechild
  • Bexm
    • #7
    • 27th Mar 07, 1:38 PM
    • #7
    • 27th Mar 07, 1:38 PM
    Hi DC adnevery body

    Thank you all so much for your input!

    DC, this therma skirt claims to be different from the type of skirting board heaters that you have mentioned. Apparently it's a "new" version.

    Is there a specific brand that you have or is it some sort of standard "skirting heating"?

    Thanks

    Bex
  • dc
    • #8
    • 27th Mar 07, 9:23 PM
    • #8
    • 27th Mar 07, 9:23 PM
    Mine is Finrad, output for single finned pipe ( similar priciple to car radiator fins) is 570watts per metre. Heat output is regulated by an adjustable flap at the top which reduces air flow over the finned pipe I dont even know if they still exist, but others did them including Myson. There have been a lot of amalgamations/take-overs in the heating industry so its googlin' time.

    Cheaper on pipework, maybe?, as the pipe runs are the radiators. No lifting floorboards for pipe runs, just drill a holle in the wall to continue in next room.
    One thing I forgot to mention was that we have conventional rads in the kitchen and bathroom where wall space is limited. Did think of building it into the bath panel tho'.

    Modern equiv. is climaboard, http://www.climaboard.co.uk/, looks very similar to Finrad which originally had a wooden top, which was replace with white enamelled one and were about 50 mm deep x 200mm high. This is smaller 150 x 30mm, and at 300w/m is about half the output of mine.

    Thermaskirt http://www.discreteheat.co.uk/how_it_works.html, replaces the skirt completely as it is a radiator only and does not need to have an air gap at the bottom. Will possibly require longer lengths. I like the cable concealment faclity, but still wish we had cellars like the Yanks for all the utilites. My only concern is that it is aluminium and therefore more prone to corrosion and electrolytic reaction.

    Similar http://www.heatprofile.co.uk/NewFiles/home.html

    Seems like double Finrad is still popular for heating on boats.
    Last edited by dc; 27-03-2007 at 11:27 PM.
    ac's lovechild
  • dc
    • #9
    • 28th Mar 07, 11:29 AM
    • #9
    • 28th Mar 07, 11:29 AM
    Forgot to say one advantage is the low water content of the system,resulting in a much faster warm up time.

    Mine has less than 20 litres even with 2 conventional rads. A quarter the water , so four times quicker to reach the design temp.

    A second concern having slept on it, is, if the return pipe is in the aluminium casting, then the incoming (flow) will tend to reheat the outgoing ( return) colder water. This would mean not all heat would get to the radiator surfaces and by increasing the temp of return would also reduce the possibility of a condensing boiler operating in condensing mode. I suppose if the return pipe was the lower one the heat transfer would be reduced, but not eliminated.
    ac's lovechild
    • dld2s
    • By dld2s 19th Apr 07, 4:48 PM
    • 362 Posts
    • 193 Thanks
    dld2s
    Bexm,

    did you ever get this skirting heating? I am looking to get this myself, but i'm wondering if it was any good and any problems with it,
    cheers
  • I-ty
    Bexm,

    Did you ever get to your skirting heating? We're looking at getting some heating in a house and are seriously considering it throughout.
    How hot can it get compared to regular radiators?
    Is it safe to touch (with regards to kids)?

    Cheers
  • dante
    is that all the same?
    I also wondered about fitting my house with skirting board heating.I heard its good for allergies and asthma and i am astmathic myself.I tried cuople of companies like desscreet heat,heat profile and bestboard and i am not sure what woul ebe the best.They all look the same.Bestboard claims to give about 40% of the energy savings comparing to radiators but i am not convinced if ist that possible.
  • Cardew
    They all look the same.Bestboard claims to give about 40% of the energy savings comparing to radiators but i am not convinced if ist that possible.
    Originally posted by dante
    It most certainly is not possible.

    They give out exactly the same amount of heat as radiators(for the same money).

    Their claims are on the basis that you don't need the room as warm with their radiators.

    There might be marginal advantages to having heat from a lower source(although I am not convinced) but it would be difficult to quantify and would depend on the room.

    If you have any doubts - check with the Energy Saving Trust.
  • dante
    well
    they say using that kinda heating u can avoid building up warmth below the ceiling and that makes sense to me cos heat always goes up.They also claim using skirting board installed round the room makes it giving up heat proportionally.Right.Makes sense.I believe there is SOME savings coming from it but is it that much?I checked that on Energy Carbon Trust and they have been enlisted there and there is some kinda allowance if u buy that stuff so must be something about it but I am not really good with technical stuff so I am not surecos 40% sounds too good to be real.
  • Cardew
    Of course hot air rises and there will be temperature differentials between the ceiling and the floor. However there is movement of air(currents) in all rooms and in a house these differences are not marked.

    However there is some sort of assumption that the warm air from radiators rises and stays at ceiling level. However the warm air from skirting board heaters has some 'magical' qualities and doesn't rise to the ceiling!!

    If you believe that skirting board heaters gives you big savings then go ahead and buy them.

    P.S Never heard of the 'Energy Carbon Trust'. The authority is Energy Saving Trust. Contact them and ask what they feel about these claims.
    • Ken68
    • By Ken68 15th Jan 08, 3:35 PM
    • 5,804 Posts
    • 3,442 Thanks
    Ken68
    I would think there is a market for some economic device to bring the heated air back down to floor level from the ceiling .
    Maybe even a ceiling fan/light or something more directional.
  • dante
    well I checked that Carbon Trust and that is kinda governmental agency too and they can give some allowances.Thats reall but rest of it.Well, I dont know really.I am not so convinced as I am crap with technicals.How about air movement.Guys selling skirtingboard heaters claim tehy provide radiant heat and it doesnt cause air movement ( so allegedly is good for astmathics) P.S www.carbontrust.co.uk ( we learn something new every day)
    • Ken68
    • By Ken68 17th Jan 08, 9:44 AM
    • 5,804 Posts
    • 3,442 Thanks
    Ken68
    When insulating a floor recently, Dante, the research suggested to pay particular attention to the skirt area. So maybe the draught cancels out the heat.
  • mwadsworth
    Sorry ,
    That should say 'tested' not testes (and no, we're not talking boll**s!)
    Thanks
    Martin
    • Ken68
    • By Ken68 7th Feb 08, 8:55 AM
    • 5,804 Posts
    • 3,442 Thanks
    Ken68
    Can only go by experience mwad...not so long ago lived in a large bungalow with full skirt heating, had to resort to fitting panel radiators. Perhaps the skirt heating wasn't sized correctly , but the place was built to a good spec so doubt that. Just useless as a form of heating. Not enough umph.
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