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  • toonfish
    • #2
    • 19th Mar 07, 9:16 PM
    • #2
    • 19th Mar 07, 9:16 PM
    they may be mortgageable, but often need to be "repaired" as a condition of th emortgage as they are considered defective dwellings. Some lenders will advance money on them as they are, but the interest rates are very high - often 9% plus
    I am a Mortgage Adviser
    You should note that this site doesn't check my status as a Mortgage Adviser, so you need to take my word for it.


    This signature is here as I follow MSE's Mortgage Adviser code of conduct. Any posts on here are for information and discussion purposes only and shouldn't be seen as financial advice.



  • leannie
    • #3
    • 26th Mar 07, 8:57 PM
    • #3
    • 26th Mar 07, 8:57 PM
    A Cornish Unit is a type of house mainly built in the 1950's. It refers to what the house was constructed of, there is an issue of the possible deterioration of structural reinforced concrete in prefabricated houses such as these.
    They are mortgageable, in a purely Cornish unit state they tend to be for existing tenants of the local authority purchasing via Right to Buy and the rates are high.
    By removing the external concrete units and replacing them with a brick cladding, you can increase the ability to mortgage them, although my limited experience is that lenders do not like lending 100% on them.
    I would (certainly if buying in Cornwall), be wary of mundic block in addition to the cornish unit build, many of the estates of cornish unit houses here, also have a lot of mundic problems.
    I presume the house is an ex local authority house, in which case the room sizes and gardens are normally larger than average, and they make comfortable homes!
  • Mad Max
    • #4
    • 16th Nov 08, 10:15 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Nov 08, 10:15 PM
    A Cornish Unit is a type of house mainly built in the 1950's. It refers to what the house was constructed of, there is an issue of the possible deterioration of structural reinforced concrete in prefabricated houses such as these.
    They are mortgageable, in a purely Cornish unit state they tend to be for existing tenants of the local authority purchasing via Right to Buy and the rates are high.
    By removing the external concrete units and replacing them with a brick cladding, you can increase the ability to mortgage them, although my limited experience is that lenders do not like lending 100% on them.
    I would (certainly if buying in Cornwall), be wary of mundic block in addition to the cornish unit build, many of the estates of cornish unit houses here, also have a lot of mundic problems.
    I presume the house is an ex local authority house, in which case the room sizes and gardens are normally larger than average, and they make comfortable homes!
    Originally posted by leannie
    Cornish unit properties are a steel reinforced frame with concrete panels, with a Mansard roof. Typical improvement is the building of a second, brick wall to create a cavity wall, with insulation.

    As system built properties go they are quite robust, the biggest problem being the risk of the steel reinforcing the frame failing due to ingress of water. This is smaller than with most system built homes. They are very pooly insulated due to thin, single skin walls.

    Also, as cornish unit properties are made of pre-cast concrete panels, and mundic is a proplem accociated with blocks containing china clay waste, you wouldn't find mundic blocks in a cornish unit!
  • feisty1
    • #5
    • 17th Nov 08, 7:41 AM
    • #5
    • 17th Nov 08, 7:41 AM
    Ask yr advisor to speak to the surveyor as to who if any lenders do lend on these, you should rcv some valuable feedback from that
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