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  • FIRST POST
    Pegasus25
    Child with Type 1 Diabetes
    • #1
    • 11th Jun 12, 1:05 PM
    Child with Type 1 Diabetes 11th Jun 12 at 1:05 PM
    Does anyone else have a child with type 1 diabetes and receiving disability benefit for them?

    We have only just found out about ours and the hospital have said to apply for disability benefit although not everyone gets it.

    We don't have much income and the extra care he now needs and hospital trips, taking time out of work etc, is going to be a strain, I think we may be entitled to something (undoubtedly at the lower rate) however he turns 16 in seven months and I'm not sure it's worth it, as even if we get it, I'm assuming our housing benefit will go down accordingly?

    Any info would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
Page 1
  • Dunroamin
    • #2
    • 11th Jun 12, 1:13 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Jun 12, 1:13 PM
    As he is nearly 16, why not discuss this with him and see what he wants to do?
  • moose1982
    • #3
    • 11th Jun 12, 2:53 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Jun 12, 2:53 PM
    I'm guessing he has more problems than just Type 1 Diabetes? Just having IDDM will not give any benefit.

    Does he have no warning signs of a low? That's all I can think of that they may give consideration towards, but even then it's unlikely.

    (I have IDDM myself but don't get anything extra over and above the normal things like eye tests and prescriptions)
  • krisskross
    • #4
    • 11th Jun 12, 3:10 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Jun 12, 3:10 PM
    I think it is very important that you do not allow his diagnosis of type 1 diabetes to be seen as a disability. He will learn to manage it very quickly. You need to take a back seat here as it is HIS lifelong health issue and he must be encouraged to take charge and deal with it. Unless of course he has other health issues that may prevent this.

    Gary Mabbut played football for England and he had diabetes.
  • ab.da54
    • #5
    • 11th Jun 12, 3:55 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Jun 12, 3:55 PM
    I think it is very important that you do not allow his diagnosis of type 1 diabetes to be seen as a disability. He will learn to manage it very quickly. You need to take a back seat here as it is HIS lifelong health issue and he must be encouraged to take charge and deal with it. Unless of course he has other health issues that may prevent this.

    Gary Mabbut played football for England and he had diabetes.
    Originally posted by krisskross
    I watched a programme the other day which talked about those in the public eye having health issues and it mentioned one of the Jonas brothers [some youngster type star, don't really know much about him] and the lead singer of a rock group [can't remember his name, think the band was something called Poison] but they were both diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

    The Jonas brother manages his diabetes very well, the rock star didn't and became very ill at one point, although he does manage it now.

    With the right diet, proper insulin injections, type 1 diabetes is a very manageable condition and yes, just because so and so can manage, doesn't mean others can, and, to a point, if there are other complications, I agree, but type 1 on it's own is a manageable condition.

    Hopefully the chld will be able to get their head round being diagnosed with this and understand how important it is to take proper care, otherwise there could be complications.

    I wish the child well, and, like krisskross, I would say try not to let the child become the disease.

    Good luck with it
    • Tiddlywinks
    • By Tiddlywinks 11th Jun 12, 8:28 PM
    • 4,232 Posts
    • 14,541 Thanks
    Tiddlywinks
    • #6
    • 11th Jun 12, 8:28 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Jun 12, 8:28 PM
    Reading your post through I was thinking through any additional care needs that may be required for a young child but then you mentioned he was nearly 16.... he is very nearly an adult and is certainly more than able to understand the concepts of his own personal care requirements.

    I think you will struggle to have DLA awarded for an otherwise 'healthy'15 year old teen boy to be honest.

    You need to give reassurance and teach him to take this in his stride (paying due attention to routine meds and diet etc of course) not use it as an opportunity to badge him as disabled in order to claim an allowance.
  • celine2009
    • #7
    • 11th Jun 12, 11:02 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Jun 12, 11:02 PM
    My son was 15 and 4 months when he was diagnosed with diabetes. He is 21 now. He doesn't view himself as disabled and certainly took charge of his own medication straight away.
    However he still needed support, help to decide how much insulin to take, help when he was hypo etc,. It's a lot for a young person to accept and understand.
    I don't know how it affects housing benefit.
    My son did get DLA, we assumed it would be until he was 16 (as that was what the hospital told us) but it actually was given until the day before he was 18 (it might have been the day he was 18 it stopped) . Not sure if that is usual though.
    As far as I understand it adults with type 1 diabetes don't get DLA unless there are other health issues.
  • bored at home
    • #8
    • 11th Jun 12, 11:28 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Jun 12, 11:28 PM
    if you are awarded dla for your son it will not affect housing benefit or any other benefits you claim for yourself or your husband as its not means tested and not included in benefit calculations.
    so if he is entitled to it its worth claiming it in my opinion. if he is injecting himself various times a day i would consider that to be care needs above and beyond that of a normal person.
  • sizzler1893
    • #9
    • 12th Jun 12, 5:29 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Jun 12, 5:29 PM
    If he was unable to manage the condition on his own through sudden unexpected hypos or poor control resulting in general ill health he might.

    Your best bet is to contact DiabetesUK they have information packs concerning diabetes and benefits.
  • margymuggins
    diabetes type 1
    i have had it for 45yrs with a lot of ups and downs along the way never knew i could claim But when i had heart attacck and angina i claimed but the doctor kept asking why i hadn't claimed before i also know of someone who is type 1 in their 20+ now had it from childhood gets MRC dla and at one stage her mother claimed carers allowance Why not just apply theres only 2 answers yes or no it will give you peace of mind I might add at times it's not plain sailing and you can come across huge waves along lifes way Good luck with whatever you decide
    =Pegasus25;53711451]Does anyone else have a child with type 1 diabetes and receiving disability benefit for them?

    We have only just found out about ours and the hospital have said to apply for disability benefit although not everyone gets it.

    We don't have much income and the extra care he now needs and hospital trips, taking time out of work etc, is going to be a strain, I think we may be entitled to something (undoubtedly at the lower rate) however he turns 16 in seven months and I'm not sure it's worth it, as even if we get it, I'm assuming our housing benefit will go down accordingly?

    Any info would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.[/QUOTE]
  • skintmacflint
    As a another long term Type 1 diabetic can only see your son being awarded it at his age, if he has erratic hypo problems or long term uncontrolled brittle diabetes.

    As his condiotn stabilises the hospital bvisits will beome less frequent. Many controlled diabetics only see the consultant once a year for what's called their annual service!!

    I was diagnosed in my teens, and can still remember not wanting to feel different from my peers. It shows the extent of this when a teenager when one of the first things I asked the consultant was if I'd still be able to go to the pubs with friends and have a normal social life ( lol)

    One thing I would advise for later is to warn him of the side effects of alchohol and insulin comas, due to effect of alchohol lowering blood sugars. I was unaware of this and came a few croppers with this, until I quickly wised up.

    Despite developing many long term health problems with it over several decades, some of which are now serious , I managed to hold onto a well paid responsible job, including business trips overseas, till retirement. Never ever considered myself disabled back then or even now.
  • she73
    My husband has been injecting since he was 8 hes now 42 and hes never got anything for type 1 diabetes hes never seen it as a disibility and has worked his whole life.Now that type 1 diabetes has caused a catalogue of problems including kidney failure,hes had to give up work hes in and out of hospital and has recently spent 7 months there and still he cant get dla ,even though he cant walk because of other problems so good luck trying but believe me its hard to get.
  • Ettenna
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/161852393869671/

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/228837803846726/

    If you've got Facebook look at these groups. The second one is for parents of teenagers and may be more relevant. The information is invaluable. Some of the parents on there have had some experience of DLA. You can ask all sorts of questions and not feel stupid

    My daughter is T1 (diagnosed at 17, now nearly 19 and on HDU after a car accident). We haven't even bothered to claim even though she did not have good control through no fault of her own (before her accident).
  • sizzler1893
    Poor control wont neccessarily mean you qualify for DLA. Ive been Type 1 for 30 years with brittle diabetes and my claim for DLA is on other problems. Unless the effects of poor control meet the criteria you wont get anywhere.
  • tiddlertot
    Even if it was 'uncontrollable' Type 1, it would NOT be accepted for a DLA claim for someone who is nearly 16 (adult for DLA purposes)

    For someone who is much much younger it could well be accepted.

    Type 1 is more of a nuisance than a disability in adults.

    However some complications of Diabetes could well be good enough to qualify for DLA.
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