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  • FIRST POST
    Frugal Fox
    Granary flour - any alternatives?
    • #1
    • 16th Feb 07, 10:47 PM
    Granary flour - any alternatives? 16th Feb 07 at 10:47 PM
    Hi,

    Please excuse my naivity!

    I've only recently got my breadmaker (Panasonic 253) and I love it!!!

    However, I also love granary bread. Am I right in my assumption that 'Granary' is a Hovis trademake and therefore the 'only' flour that can be granary is 'Hovis'. If so - what alternatives do I have, as Hovis granary flour is a little on the pricey side!

    I've seen a post where the granary flour is mixed with wholewheat and strong white.

    Or am I just completely barking and other people do 'granary'?

    Many thanks in advance,
    FF
    "A simple life freely chosen is a source of strength. Do not be pursuaded into buying what you do not need or cannot afford." Quaker Faith & Practice 1.02.41
Page 1
  • lil_me
    • #2
    • 16th Feb 07, 10:55 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Feb 07, 10:55 PM
    What is Granary flour?
    Granary is a registered trade name of Rank Hovis Ltd and is a malted wheat grain flour. Malted wheat grain flour is a brown flour with malted wheat grains added for distinctive nutty flavour.
    So brown flour and extra malted wheat grains, or you could add your own version of the grains and seeds you like.
    One day I might be more organised...........:confused:
  • Gingernutmeg
    • #3
    • 16th Feb 07, 11:42 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Feb 07, 11:42 PM
    My mum owns a bakery and we used to buy our 'Granary' flour direct from Rank-Hovis, until they stopped supplying us because we were too small. We now buy Allied's (I think, could be some other miller) 'Harvester' flour from another supplier. It's almost exactly the same although we do find it a bit less malty (but oddly it has a bit more of a burnt sugar taste ... possibly cheap malt) which means it needs a little longer for proving, although I'd imagine that difference is probably negligable in a breadmaker.

    So yes, anything that says 'Harvester' or just has malt and grains in it is more or less the same as 'Granary'. Most granary flour that you can buy in the shops has no real wholemeal in it though, the colour comes from the powdered malt extract that they add to the white flour. That's what gives it the distinctive brown colour and sweetish taste.
    Last edited by Gingernutmeg; 16-02-2007 at 11:54 PM.
  • eryn_kathleen
    • #4
    • 17th Feb 07, 8:24 AM
    • #4
    • 17th Feb 07, 8:24 AM
    Most granary flour that you can buy in the shops has no real wholemeal in it though, the colour comes from the powdered malt extract that they add to the white flour. That's what gives it the distinctive brown colour and sweetish taste.
    by Gingernutmeg
    Interesting! I never knew that...

    Is there any place to buy real wholemeal/granary flour in person (rather than bakery) quantities?
  • Gingernutmeg
    • #5
    • 17th Feb 07, 11:01 AM
    • #5
    • 17th Feb 07, 11:01 AM
    We've never had real wholemeal (with bits of meal in it) granary flour,even when we bought it from Rank-Hovis. It was always a fine flour that was light brownish in colour and had nothing in it but the grains. Good granary flour might be made from brown flour with the meal extracted but the vast majority that's available now is simply made from white flour with malt extracts. In fact, I'm not sure that it ever was a 'wholemeal' based flour ... from what I remember the Reps telling us granary is simply a development of white bread - it's a little healthier because it has the whole grains in it but that was balanced with the malt to make it sweeter and more palatable, and more appealing to a wider market. It has a reputation for being healthier because people think it's 'brown', but in fact it's just sweeter white bread lol. You could mix granary flour 1/2 and 1/2 with wholemeal flour though, that would probably be really nice if you like a 'rough' bread.

    The only places I've found really, really good flour available in domestic quantities is direct from small mills, although it's difficult to find granary flour as a lot of places don't want to be dealing with all of the stuff you have to add to make 'granary' (there's also the problem of the trade name, you can't call it granary unless you're Rank-Hovis). It's worth asking around locally though. There's a really good index in the back of a book called 'Country Bread' by Linda Collister and Anthony Blake, which lists the names of various suppliers across the UK. It's a lovely book too, lots of great recipes and pictures and a fantastic section on sourdoughs.
  • Justie
    • #6
    • 17th Feb 07, 11:57 AM
    • #6
    • 17th Feb 07, 11:57 AM
    we usually mix half and half wholemeal and malted flour or add some spelt or one of the other grains which make it much tastier than plain wholemeal.
  • Seakay
    • #7
    • 17th Feb 07, 12:06 PM
    • #7
    • 17th Feb 07, 12:06 PM
    Doves Farm do Organic Malthouse Flour - Available in some healthfood shops, Tesco, Sainsburys etc.
    Allinsons do a Harvester flour which is granary style, available from the same sources
  • janetmw
    • #8
    • 17th Feb 07, 2:14 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Feb 07, 2:14 PM
    Hi,

    Hovis granary flour is a little on the pricey side!
    by Frugal Fox
    It is on BOGOF in Morrisons until 11th March along with the other Hovis bread flours.

    Janet
  • zoldexa
    • #9
    • 21st Dec 11, 4:31 PM
    • #9
    • 21st Dec 11, 4:31 PM
    Hi,

    Please excuse my naivity!

    I've only recently got my breadmaker (Panasonic 253) and I love it!!!

    However, I also love granary bread. Am I right in my assumption that 'Granary' is a Hovis trademake and therefore the 'only' flour that can be granary is 'Hovis'. If so - what alternatives do I have, as Hovis granary flour is a little on the pricey side!

    I've seen a post where the granary flour is mixed with wholewheat and strong white.

    Or am I just completely barking and other people do 'granary'?

    Many thanks in advance,
    FF
    Originally posted by Frugal Fox
    Here is a link to Shipton Mills A great malted flour I think is better than Granary makes a beautiful malted loaf at a price you can afford. I buy the 15 kilo bag at 15.50 and some other flours which is delivered free.

    Shipton mill website / organic light malthouse flour wont let me do a link so heres the best I can do

    Hovis is a RIP OFF this is better quality organic flour that tastes better anyway
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