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  • FIRST POST
    Rich67
    Overhead power line compensation.
    • #1
    • 25th Dec 11, 10:20 PM
    Overhead power line compensation. 25th Dec 11 at 10:20 PM
    Hi All,

    I had a letter a few days ago regarding compensation for power lines that cross over my house.

    This was from a company called PCC who claimed to have been acting for the previous owner and been very close to the end of the claim after the previous owner had an offer.

    I have since moved in around 3 months ago and they advise that I am entitled to this payment.

    First I phoned up the electric company direct who confirmed this was the case and after numerous callback I spoke to the man who was handiling the case and he advised the power company had offered £4173.

    He did advise that I would have an easement with the electric company and they would then have permission to run the power lines over the house he also added that the likly hood of getting the moved or removed was next to none.

    I then phoned PCC who advisd that they would charge £1000 for there services so I would get £3173 but the man at the electric compnay did advise I can apoint my own solicitor and they would pay reasonable costs meaning I would get the full amount.

    So my question is has anyone on here heard off or done this before and if yes what restrictions adds to your property.
Page 5
    • underwood1
    • By underwood1 26th Feb 16, 4:29 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    underwood1
    Hi Mobilejo

    We have in the garden approx 25m from the house a pole, which has a metal cross piece at the top, which supports 3 wires, these run across the entire garden and connect to the neighbours double pole which contains a large grey square box.

    In the front garden we have a pole with a single wire, which runs across the front garden and connects to the neigbours pole, which has two further wires one runs to the neighbours house and feeds both them and us our electric, the other wire runs across the road and services the other 2 neighbouring properties. As to the wires strength, Western power tree surgeons removed trees interfering with it las year and they said the wire was carrying 30,000 volts? but this may not be correct, we do not know for sure. But it too draws its power from the other neighbours double pole with the grey box!
    Last edited by underwood1; 26-02-2016 at 4:43 PM. Reason: forgot to add something
    • krystaltitch
    • By krystaltitch 26th Feb 16, 9:22 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    krystaltitch
    high powered lines along the bottom of my garden.
    Hi I am new to this site and 67 years old so a bit of a technophobe so please accept my apologies if I get it wrong. I have power lines attached to a wooden pole. The pole is on my side of the fence and the lines pass along the bottom of the rear garden. I spoke to Western recently and the man said they were high powered lines. My husband has checked the pole but cannot see the voltage. I had breast cancer in 1993 . I used to enjoy the bottom of the garden with the sound of running water from the waterfall and pond and spent a lot of time there. We originally thought that these lines were telephone lines as shrubs growing up the pole obscured the warning sign. My son got his kite caught on the wires . The kite wrapped itself round the wires so my husband said he would not be able to get it down. About a month later I noticed a man with yellow gloves and special equipment removing the kite. Then we had bad snow which affected the lines, so tension wire were fitted to the pole which are really unsightly. After I had breast cancer I requested that the lines be removed and I was sent a plan, not sure about the time scale , probably 1995 to 2000. The costs was £12000. The lines were to be put underground past three properties altogether. I would have paid this but it was a lot of money which we did not have and would have had to add to our mortgage. My husband was not in agreement, so that was that. I now wish to have the lines removed and I am in no way interested in compensation as I would not want any future occupiers to be lumbered with them with no way out. I have asked Western and am now waiting for their quotation. The pole is about 50 feet from my lounge window and is at eye level when sat on the settee. This is because the rear garden drops away . I have had cancer investigations recently and I am worried. My husband does not understand why I never go in the garden. What is my position on having the lines placed underground?
    • underwood1
    • By underwood1 27th Feb 16, 9:29 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    underwood1
    krystaltitch, sorry to hear about your health issues. When we bought our house, we were concerned about the negative health problems, we had heard muted in the past, regarding overhead power lines. After much research, we found that the only possible 'issue' was with childhood leukemia and that was only where there was a high concentration of pylons, although it did state that there was still insufficient data to link this directly.

    If I were you, I would enjoy your garden, we love ours and often sit beneath either the 1 power line or the 3 power lines. In the last 3 years our health has been the best it has been for years, we do not even get colds! There is often more direct electric current in a house, with its many appliances/lights etc which would cause more harm than sitting in the fresh air listening to the running water.

    Good luck with your health.
    • krystaltitch
    • By krystaltitch 27th Feb 16, 1:50 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    krystaltitch
    Underwood1 thank you for your re-assuring words. I had read about the link to leukemia in children. I have this worry that when we downsize in the future, this being a large five bed roomed house that a family with small children will move in. My sister and I had children around the same age so she would spend a lot of time at my house because the children loved to play in the large garden. Unfortunately my nephew developed leukemia and whilst he had this he contracted chicken pox and we nearly lost him. He was only 4 years old and I would not want any child to go through what my nephew went through. My children were fine so it could be that my nephew was unlucky. However I feel that even though there is a slight risk if I can pursue this with the electricity board at a cost to no one else but myself I will have peace of mind not only for myself but for future families. I will enjoy my garden this summer as you advised. Thank you..
    • mobilejo
    • By mobilejo 27th Feb 16, 4:33 PM
    • 85 Posts
    • 53 Thanks
    mobilejo
    Hi Mobilejo

    We have in the garden approx 25m from the house a pole, which has a metal cross piece at the top, which supports 3 wires, these run across the entire garden and connect to the neighbours double pole which contains a large grey square box.

    In the front garden we have a pole with a single wire, which runs across the front garden and connects to the neigbours pole, which has two further wires one runs to the neighbours house and feeds both them and us our electric, the other wire runs across the road and services the other 2 neighbouring properties. As to the wires strength, Western power tree surgeons removed trees interfering with it las year and they said the wire was carrying 30,000 volts? but this may not be correct, we do not know for sure. But it too draws its power from the other neighbours double pole with the grey box!
    Originally posted by underwood1
    In the back you have a high voltage line and wooden pylon - these can be worth £000's but there are numerous factors to be taken into account in determining the value of the claim. I'm no expert in those so I can't say what you should be looking for. If you do it alone, you're at the mercy of the electricity company. If they offered you 30% less than it's worth, how would you know? If you wanted to convince them that the claim is worth more, what comparables would you provide to justify your case? This is probably why they like to deal with claimants directly

    The one at the front sounds like a low voltage pole - these are the ones worth a few hundred at most. You can go it alone with those but it appears that most companies aren't charging a fee for dealing with those in any event.
    • Keep pedalling
    • By Keep pedalling 27th Feb 16, 4:44 PM
    • 2,143 Posts
    • 2,270 Thanks
    Keep pedalling
    Please don't believe everything you read on the Internet especially regards health issues. There is absolutely no evidence that power lines cause cancer.
    • bims
    • By bims 23rd May 16, 11:38 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    bims
    Other settlement amounts
    I am currently self representing myself with negotiations with WPD over a claim relating to HV lines over our garden, a wooden pole with transformer and stays and then around 100m of LV underground cabling going down along our driveway. What I'm finding hard to come by is comparisions of other settlements as their initial offer is somewhat way off what we would consider acceptable, I.e. around 20% of what we would accept. Anyone have access to other settlements or guidelines used to make offers and what the initial offer is as a % of final offer etc?
    • kabadi
    • By kabadi 15th Aug 16, 9:20 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    kabadi
    bims, any update on what you got or got offered? This could help others with the same question you had.
    Val
    • Benjamin Lenton
    • By Benjamin Lenton 30th Aug 16, 12:44 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Benjamin Lenton
    Powerline / Electricity Line Compensation - Wood Poles
    It's a bit of minefield claiming compensation for powerlines. I am a Chartered Surveyor from a firm based in Cambridge that specialises in this work. I won't mention our name or website links as it is probably in breach of MSE terms and I would rather this post isn't removed. Instead I set out some general alround info below which might help.

    Claims companies
    These vary in terms of the personal service they offer. Some do or do not inspect your property.

    Low voltage wood pole lines
    These supply 240v directly your neighbour's home and probably run across your garden or drive. The line may also serve your own property. I wouldn't advise entering into anything other than an annual wayleave here. This gives you the right to an annual payment from the electricity company which are standard payments. If you enter into a 15 year or 25 year wayleave you might struggle to extend your home or get the line removed as you might not be able to terminate the agreement and get the line altered in such an event. In general I don't think the one off 15 or 25 year payments are enough to warrant the process and you are better just obtaining an annual wayleave payment and you must ensure you can terminate any such agreement.

    High voltage wood pole lines
    These can, in certain instances, give rise to larger, one off payments depending on the impact and other factors. Figures can be £1,500 to much more than £10,000. However, various aspects require expert negotiation to get a correct settlement. You certainly cannot rely on the electricity company to provide a fair offer. Please remember that they are a profit making Plc with shareholders to look after.

    High voltage steel pylon lines
    These give rise to the largest possible payments. The vast majority of these claims have been done though. This is why claims companies are now trying to do settlements on low voltage wood pole lines.

    Disclaimer: please do not take my advice above as suitable for your specific circumstances. You should seek proffessional advice from someone working in this field to assess the best option for you.
    Last edited by Benjamin Lenton; 30-08-2016 at 4:17 PM.
    • CHRISTOPHER GREEN
    • By CHRISTOPHER GREEN 30th Aug 16, 3:31 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    CHRISTOPHER GREEN
    Sharp Practice
    Dear All,
    The Broadbent company got my wife to sign what is no doubt their standard instruction form. They have come up with a proposed settlement for a large pylon in our field. The net compensation amount is around £4k. We don't think that this is enough to sign away any rights that we may have forever (although I agree that the power company is probably never ever going to remove the tower). We would like to decline the 'offer; ad the Broadbent company now want to hit us for his 18% of the amount plus an additional fee that he would have received from the power company. So we are in a position where we either have to accept the £4k or pay +/- £2k.
    We feel terribly entrapped by this firm, we don't think that they've done a particularly stunning job but need to pay a lot of money because of it.
    Any advice?
    • Benjamin Lenton
    • By Benjamin Lenton 30th Aug 16, 4:05 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Benjamin Lenton
    Wood Pole compensation
    Some firms do lock you in in this way. My preference is for the client to be able to choose whether or not to complete the process without an abortive fee.
    • Domlowe
    • By Domlowe 20th Sep 16, 9:30 AM
    • 7 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Domlowe
    High voltage wood pole lines
    These can, in certain instances, give rise to larger, one off payments depending on the impact and other factors. Figures can be £1,500 to much more than £10,000. However, various aspects require expert negotiation to get a correct settlement. You certainly cannot rely on the electricity company to provide a fair offer. Please remember that they are a profit making Plc with shareholders to look after.
    Originally posted by Benjamin Lenton
    I have one of these in my front garden just a few feet from my house and then an 11Kv cable running through my garden and under my property - I've have just engaged Western Power to negotiate a claim for 'injurious affection' and intend to negotiate myself as far as I can to avoid paying any 3rd parties but if I do feel out of my depth then I'll engage a surveyor or solicitor.
    I know the amount of compensation payable is based on property value and how this is reduced by the pole/stay/cable being where they are but my query is how is the percentage calculated? Number of windows it can be seen from? Whereabouts in the view from the house is it? How much in the way is it? How much is the view ruined? How close to the house does it run?
    I've been verbally told by WP that it should be around 1.25% and been told by PCC that the max I'll get is 1.5% but who sets those figures? I know that you can get much higher percentages for pylons but are these just the industry standards or can they go higher for wooden poles?
    Any advice appreciated
    • Benjamin Lenton
    • By Benjamin Lenton 21st Sep 16, 9:24 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Benjamin Lenton
    What you have highlighted there is that there are various unknowns and variables that will affect the payment of compensation. My advice is that claims should only be done with a specialist surveyor in this specific field visiting your property. I can understand you may not want to pay a fee but at the end of the day if you are not a specialist professional in this area of work you will not know how to deal with the electricity company
    Last edited by Benjamin Lenton; 21-09-2016 at 9:26 AM.
    Any advice I give is for general information purposes only. You must not rely on it or act on it. You are advised to obtain your own, seperate advice from outside this forum.
    • MIke M
    • By MIke M 18th Oct 16, 6:12 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    MIke M
    I have two wooden poles carrying HV power on my land (plus another one carrying LV to my house), and I'd like to find out if there's an existing easement granted by the previous owner, or whether I can claim some compensation.

    I understand that I can get this information from the DNO (in my case SSE), but my question is: should they be the first people I contact, or should I approach them via a lawyer?

    Coincidentally, SSE is replacing one of the poles later this week. If they ask me to sign anything before or after they do it, should I decline?

    Many thanks in advance for any advice!
    • Suffolkpixie
    • By Suffolkpixie 23rd Oct 16, 9:54 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Suffolkpixie
    Hi, We have a wooden pole in our garden that carries 3 overhead power cables joined together like a plait. The cable runs just inside our boundary the full length of the property, roughly 40 metres in length and about 3 metres from the side of the property, but doesn't actually cross the it. We have just received a letter from Thomas Broadbent offering to act on our behalf with 20% commission. Do you think we would have a case worth pursuing and are there any other solicitors/companies that would deal with this for us in our area, NR33?

    Thanks in advance for any advice.
    Last edited by Suffolkpixie; 23-10-2016 at 10:03 AM. Reason: Extra information
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