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    • xoAmyox
    • By xoAmyox 1st Nov 11, 3:23 PM
    • 538Posts
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    xoAmyox
    Calculating CSA amounts
    • #1
    • 1st Nov 11, 3:23 PM
    Calculating CSA amounts 1st Nov 11 at 3:23 PM
    Hi all,

    Please could you let me know if CSA is calculated on pre-tax or after-tax pay?

    I've worked out that the amount i'm getting, compared to the hours my son's dad works, mean that he would effectively earn less than minimum wage. I've tried to explain this to the CSA, but they refused to look again at the calculations.

    Any advice appreciated!
Page 1
    • HappyMJ
    • By HappyMJ 1st Nov 11, 3:32 PM
    • 19,766 Posts
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    HappyMJ
    • #2
    • 1st Nov 11, 3:32 PM
    • #2
    • 1st Nov 11, 3:32 PM
    After tax pay. Someone on minimum wages for 37.5 hours per week and no children living with them would pay £30,£40 or £50 depending on number of children. Then that is reduced by the number of nights they have the children by 1/7th for each night per week.

    Regular savers earn 6% interest (HSBC, First Direct, M&S) Loans cost 2.9% per year (Nationwide) = FREE money.
    • xoAmyox
    • By xoAmyox 1st Nov 11, 3:35 PM
    • 538 Posts
    • 4,756 Thanks
    xoAmyox
    • #3
    • 1st Nov 11, 3:35 PM
    • #3
    • 1st Nov 11, 3:35 PM
    After tax pay. Someone on minimum wages for 37.5 hours per week and no children living with them would pay £30,£40 or £50 depending on number of children. Then that is reduced by the number of nights they have the children by 1/7th for each night per week.
    Originally posted by HappyMJ

    Could you please let me know the approximate amount payable for someone on 32.5hrs per week at the NMW (6.08p/h bracket)?

    TIA
    • HappyMJ
    • By HappyMJ 1st Nov 11, 3:39 PM
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    HappyMJ
    • #4
    • 1st Nov 11, 3:39 PM
    • #4
    • 1st Nov 11, 3:39 PM
    Could you please let me know the approximate amount payable for someone on 32.5hrs per week at the NMW (6.08p/h bracket)?

    TIA
    Originally posted by xoAmyox
    BTW I'm assuming CSA2. He would earn about £180 after tax.

    Edit: kfb is right it's £5 for the first £100 earnt then a percentage of the difference up to £200. 25%, 35% or 45%.
    So £25, £33 or £39 for 1, 2 or 3+ kids. If he has children in the house then it's reduced further.
    Last edited by HappyMJ; 01-11-2011 at 4:18 PM.

    Regular savers earn 6% interest (HSBC, First Direct, M&S) Loans cost 2.9% per year (Nationwide) = FREE money.
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 1st Nov 11, 3:46 PM
    • 6,363 Posts
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    kingfisherblue
    • #5
    • 1st Nov 11, 3:46 PM
    • #5
    • 1st Nov 11, 3:46 PM
    If the take home pay is less than £200 a week, the calculation is slightly different, but I'm not sure how it is worked out. I know that this happened with my ex, whose net pay was £192 a week. The amounts aren't vastly different, but the amount paid as maintenance is slightly less than the standard 15%, 20% or 25%.
    • xoAmyox
    • By xoAmyox 2nd Nov 11, 9:44 AM
    • 538 Posts
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    xoAmyox
    • #6
    • 2nd Nov 11, 9:44 AM
    • #6
    • 2nd Nov 11, 9:44 AM
    Could you tell me more about the rules for earning less than £200 p/w?

    Would any tax credits/benefits etc that he gets be added to the calculation as income?
    • PreludeForTimeFeelers
    • By PreludeForTimeFeelers 2nd Nov 11, 12:55 PM
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    PreludeForTimeFeelers
    • #7
    • 2nd Nov 11, 12:55 PM
    • #7
    • 2nd Nov 11, 12:55 PM
    If he is on tax credits then this should be taken into account as income, make sure that you tell the Csa you believe he is receiving them.
    • xoAmyox
    • By xoAmyox 2nd Nov 11, 2:40 PM
    • 538 Posts
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    xoAmyox
    • #8
    • 2nd Nov 11, 2:40 PM
    • #8
    • 2nd Nov 11, 2:40 PM
    I can only assume that he gets tax credits as he's over 25 and obviously a low earner, do I have to prove this to the CSA?
    • PreludeForTimeFeelers
    • By PreludeForTimeFeelers 2nd Nov 11, 5:41 PM
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    PreludeForTimeFeelers
    • #9
    • 2nd Nov 11, 5:41 PM
    • #9
    • 2nd Nov 11, 5:41 PM
    I can only assume that he gets tax credits as he's over 25 and obviously a low earner, do I have to prove this to the CSA?
    Originally posted by xoAmyox
    It seems to be a bit of a grey area - if he is asked directly by the CSA then he has to tell them the truth, or face a fine of up to £1000. If he's working fulltime and claims to be earning under £200 per week then he may be on tax credits, or may not be, all you can do is ask them and then see if they contact him to investigate further.
    • xoAmyox
    • By xoAmyox 3rd Nov 11, 8:43 AM
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    xoAmyox
    I spoke to the CSA, they said they'd ask him, but if he says he's not claiming tax credits then they have to believe him?!

    That sounds mad to me, he's on a really low wage, there's no way he's living off just that when he's flashing his new phone, new trainers etc at family birthday parties.

    Is there anything more I can do?
    • Marisco
    • By Marisco 3rd Nov 11, 9:01 AM
    • 24,690 Posts
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    Marisco
    I spoke to the CSA, they said they'd ask him, but if he says he's not claiming tax credits then they have to believe him?!

    That sounds mad to me, he's on a really low wage, there's no way he's living off just that when he's flashing his new phone, new trainers etc at family birthday parties.

    Is there anything more I can do?
    Originally posted by xoAmyox
    What more do you want to do?? You say in your first post, that you think the ex is living on less than NMW, so what do you want, to take even more off him? As for the phone etc, he could have got those on CC's or "buy now, pay whenever". How much does he pay now, and is it regular, or has he/is he trying to squirm out of paying?
    • xoAmyox
    • By xoAmyox 3rd Nov 11, 10:26 AM
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    xoAmyox
    I get £20 a week currently, but after several years of only £5 a week I feel that he should be contributing more. I know full well he doesn't work full-time so he can get away with paying me less.

    He has a new partner (don't know if she works), and he's very adept at getting what he wants out of people so he'll survive.
    • Marisco
    • By Marisco 3rd Nov 11, 2:09 PM
    • 24,690 Posts
    • 66,098 Thanks
    Marisco
    If it's on CSA 2, then it's irrelevant what his partner earns. She probably pays for his phone etc. The "going" rate on CSA 2 is 15% of his income. If they have a child, he'll have a bit knocked off, and if they get CTC that will be added onto his income for CM purposes. If he was only paying £5 previously, then he was probably unemployed, that is the "going" rate for those out of work.
    • xoAmyox
    • By xoAmyox 3rd Nov 11, 3:08 PM
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    xoAmyox
    You say if they have a child, does it make any difference if it is their child, or a child from outside of their relationship? Does the child have to live there, or does it make a difference if they only stay part of the week?

    I think that they probably have joint tax credits, so how is the calculation worked out then?
    • fannyanna
    • By fannyanna 3rd Nov 11, 3:30 PM
    • 2,556 Posts
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    fannyanna
    You say if they have a child, does it make any difference if it is their child, or a child from outside of their relationship? Does the child have to live there, or does it make a difference if they only stay part of the week?

    I think that they probably have joint tax credits, so how is the calculation worked out then?
    Originally posted by xoAmyox
    It's any resident child. So even if it's not biologically his your CSA will be effected.

    Which (even as an NRPP) is completely wrong in my opinion.
    • Marisco
    • By Marisco 3rd Nov 11, 6:40 PM
    • 24,690 Posts
    • 66,098 Thanks
    Marisco
    You say if they have a child, does it make any difference if it is their child, or a child from outside of their relationship? Does the child have to live there, or does it make a difference if they only stay part of the week?

    I think that they probably have joint tax credits, so how is the calculation worked out then?
    Originally posted by xoAmyox
    If the child is the partners, and lives with your ex and her, then that will affect your CSA. If the child only has access visits, then that will not count, as it's the parent the child lives with that will be claiming CTC, not your ex and his partner. If they claim WTC, then if he earns the most, all WTC will be taken into account, if they earn the same, then half will be included as income, but if she earns more than him, then WTC will not be taken into account at all.
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