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  • FIRST POST
    • TrickyDicky
    • By TrickyDicky 30th Sep 11, 10:57 AM
    • 649Posts
    • 225Thanks
    TrickyDicky
    How much should a new boiler cost, fitted?
    • #1
    • 30th Sep 11, 10:57 AM
    How much should a new boiler cost, fitted? 30th Sep 11 at 10:57 AM
    Just looking to get general ideas on how much a new boiler would cost?

    Currently we have an open vent system with a 20 year old boiler. We have a pump that supplies cold and hot water to the bathroom to get the extra pressure required for the large shower head. We could probably cope with a combi boiler, but given we only installed the pump last year (during a bathroom refit) Id like to keep it (I like the wet showers).

    So Id like to get a new boiler. Do newer systems still have separate zone control valves? or are they part of the boiler now? and would we still need a pump (or is this part of the boiler too?)

    We would also like to flush the system - is this possible on a microbore system with twin entry valves on the radiators? would it be worth upgrading the system away from microbore? how much would this cost?

    Any input appreciated
Page 1
    • TrickyDicky
    • By TrickyDicky 30th Sep 11, 2:21 PM
    • 649 Posts
    • 225 Thanks
    TrickyDicky
    • #2
    • 30th Sep 11, 2:21 PM
    • #2
    • 30th Sep 11, 2:21 PM
    Having a read around on the internet, a sealed system boiler might be a the way to go. Revoving the cold water tank gives the extra space but we can keep the pumped hot water in the bathroom.
  • heating-eng
    • #3
    • 30th Sep 11, 2:38 PM
    • #3
    • 30th Sep 11, 2:38 PM
    Having a read around on the internet, a sealed system boiler might be a the way to go. Revoving the cold water tank gives the extra space but we can keep the pumped hot water in the bathroom.
    Originally posted by TrickyDicky
    You may need to keep the tank for the shower.
    The heating would be sealed and you wouldn't need a tank for that.
    X British Gas engineer and X BG sales adviser.
    Please don,t let this put you off.
    • TrickyDicky
    • By TrickyDicky 30th Sep 11, 2:44 PM
    • 649 Posts
    • 225 Thanks
    TrickyDicky
    • #4
    • 30th Sep 11, 2:44 PM
    • #4
    • 30th Sep 11, 2:44 PM
    a question about repipeing - would the whole house need the microbore pipes replacing, or could it be just repiped at the radiators (saving lots of time/money)
  • heating-eng
    • #5
    • 30th Sep 11, 2:50 PM
    • #5
    • 30th Sep 11, 2:50 PM
    a question about repipeing - would the whole house need the microbore pipes replacing, or could it be just repiped at the radiators (saving lots of time/money)
    Originally posted by TrickyDicky
    You could just repipe each radiator .small bit of pipe.
    Or take out the microbore and repipe in bigger pipe.
    X British Gas engineer and X BG sales adviser.
    Please don,t let this put you off.
    • nicka99
    • By nicka99 30th Sep 11, 3:33 PM
    • 147 Posts
    • 110 Thanks
    nicka99
    • #6
    • 30th Sep 11, 3:33 PM
    • #6
    • 30th Sep 11, 3:33 PM
    Having a read around on the internet, a sealed system boiler might be a the way to go. Revoving the cold water tank gives the extra space but we can keep the pumped hot water in the bathroom.
    I dont think you can use your shower pump without a cold tank. you would essentially be trying to pump the mains which is a no no. you either keep the cold tank, hot tank and pump or take a hit on the pump and get a megaflo (or equivalent) if your mains pressure/flow is up to it and lose the cold tank. megalfo would give you the pressure you want for your shower (though maybe not quite as good as a good pump).
    Last edited by nicka99; 30-09-2011 at 3:35 PM.
    • TrickyDicky
    • By TrickyDicky 30th Sep 11, 3:42 PM
    • 649 Posts
    • 225 Thanks
    TrickyDicky
    • #7
    • 30th Sep 11, 3:42 PM
    • #7
    • 30th Sep 11, 3:42 PM
    Can I not just leave the pump connected to the hot, and take in the cold directly from the mains? The pump is a separate pump in the loft, with the shower controls just being a mixer tap. The pump pumps the water to the bath and sink too, not just the shower.
  • heating-eng
    • #8
    • 30th Sep 11, 3:44 PM
    • #8
    • 30th Sep 11, 3:44 PM
    I dont think you can use your shower pump without a cold tank. you would essentially be trying to pump the mains which is a no no. you either keep the cold tank, hot tank and pump or take a hit on the pump and get a megaflo (or equivalent) if your mains pressure/flow is up to it and lose the cold tank. megalfo would give you the pressure you want for your shower (though maybe not quite as good as a good pump).
    Originally posted by nicka99
    There is no need to do this.
    Keep the tank and pump ,shower will be good then just get a sealed system boiler for heating.
    The pump for the shower is better than any combi.
    X British Gas engineer and X BG sales adviser.
    Please don,t let this put you off.
  • heating-eng
    • #9
    • 30th Sep 11, 3:45 PM
    • #9
    • 30th Sep 11, 3:45 PM
    Can I not just leave the pump connected to the hot, and take in the cold directly from the mains? The pump is a separate pump in the loft, with the shower controls just being a mixer tap. The pump pumps the water to the bath and sink too, not just the shower.
    Originally posted by TrickyDicky
    You need to keep the big tank. No you cannot use pump on mains.
    X British Gas engineer and X BG sales adviser.
    Please don,t let this put you off.
    • TrickyDicky
    • By TrickyDicky 30th Sep 11, 3:46 PM
    • 649 Posts
    • 225 Thanks
    TrickyDicky
    I dont want to pump the mains. Just connect the taps to main, and leave the hot water pumped.
    • nicka99
    • By nicka99 30th Sep 11, 3:48 PM
    • 147 Posts
    • 110 Thanks
    nicka99
    I dont want to pump the mains. Just connect the taps to main, and leave the hot water pumped.
    Originally posted by TrickyDicky
    I have no idea. probably depends on the pump whether it would handle this and the mixer with potentially very different pressures (since once you start emptying the hot tank, the cold main will be filling it at the same time)
  • heating-eng
    I dont want to pump the mains. Just connect the taps to main, and leave the hot water pumped.
    Originally posted by TrickyDicky
    You could maybe do this. Do you want to keep pump on shower ?
    Will depend on pump as well. Never heard of the hot water been pumped. I am sure you can do it. Maybe a plumber will know more, I do heating.
    Last edited by heating-eng; 30-09-2011 at 4:16 PM.
    X British Gas engineer and X BG sales adviser.
    Please don,t let this put you off.
    • TrickyDicky
    • By TrickyDicky 30th Sep 11, 4:28 PM
    • 649 Posts
    • 225 Thanks
    TrickyDicky
    It is a twin impeller pump.
  • heating-eng
    It is a twin impeller pump.
    Originally posted by TrickyDicky
    You will need to check with the manufactures to make sure it will work as a single feed.
    X British Gas engineer and X BG sales adviser.
    Please don,t let this put you off.
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