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  • FIRST POST
    aliasojo
    Sending bank details by email?
    • #1
    • 28th Aug 11, 9:39 AM
    Sending bank details by email? 28th Aug 11 at 9:39 AM
    Not sure if this is strictly the right board for this question so apologies in advance if it may not be.

    I need to provide details of bank account number, sort code, bank name and address to someone.

    It cannot be done over the phone, it needs to be in writing. Clearly I can write a letter but I'm wondering if it is safe to email these details? It would be much quicker and easier and I can get an almost instant reply confirming receipt of info compared to the days that would be involved if post was used.
    Herman - MP for all!
Page 1
    • Abbafan1972
    • By Abbafan1972 28th Aug 11, 9:44 AM
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    Abbafan1972
    • #2
    • 28th Aug 11, 9:44 AM
    • #2
    • 28th Aug 11, 9:44 AM
    I would have thought it'd be ok. Everytime you send someone a cheque, this has your bank details on.

    At work, we email our customers' our bank details, so they can pay us by BACS. The bank details though are saved as a word document, so it is sent as an attachment, rather than in the main body of the email (I don't know if this would make a difference).
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    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 28th Aug 11, 10:18 AM
    • 7,102 Posts
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    pmduk
    • #3
    • 28th Aug 11, 10:18 AM
    • #3
    • 28th Aug 11, 10:18 AM
    I do it without a qualm, but I know that my bank asks customers not to include these details in emails to them.
    • ChiefGrasscutter
    • By ChiefGrasscutter 28th Aug 11, 10:27 AM
    • 2,066 Posts
    • 1,982 Thanks
    ChiefGrasscutter
    • #4
    • 28th Aug 11, 10:27 AM
    • #4
    • 28th Aug 11, 10:27 AM
    If you are supplying your bank sort code, acc number, address etc for someone to pay you by BACS I would be one preferring that you wrote them down and sent them by email rather than relying on the phone and verbal communication.

    Then in the future when the payment goes "astray" it will be quite clear to all where the fault lies rather than everyone blaming each other about who said what/heard what - assuming you make sure that you check and send the correct info!

    I agree with the other replies so far. Quite normal to supply such details to someone for making direct payments into your account and anyway they appear pre printed on every cheque anyone writes
  • jalexa
    • #5
    • 28th Aug 11, 10:52 AM
    • #5
    • 28th Aug 11, 10:52 AM
    I do it without a qualm, but I know that my bank asks customers not to include these details in emails to them.
    Originally posted by pmduk
    Indeed. But when a bank phones a customer (number witheld) it expects the customer to confirm personal details such as date of birth. Pah.

    I got a call the other day:

    "Hello it's the bank".
    "Oh which bank would that be".
    "That's how we are told to ask" (but still didn't say).
    "In that case please write to my registered address. Goodbye"
    • Joe_Bloggs
    • By Joe_Bloggs 28th Aug 11, 10:55 AM
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    Joe_Bloggs
    • #6
    • 28th Aug 11, 10:55 AM
    • #6
    • 28th Aug 11, 10:55 AM
    Make sure that those who send you money use the beneficiary /payment reference field. This is often left blank or misused as the use is entirely at the discretion of the payer. Without guidance, the payer cannot provide helpful information to the payee/beneficiary .
    J_B.
    OFT work merger decisions 2012:- MSE too small to be worth financial consideration ?
    • googler
    • By googler 28th Aug 11, 10:58 AM
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    googler
    • #7
    • 28th Aug 11, 10:58 AM
    • #7
    • 28th Aug 11, 10:58 AM
    If you're worried about putting them all in one e-mail which may be intercepted, split the sort code over 3 e-mails, and divvy the account number up in the same way, and ask the recipient at the other end to piece it together.
  • crazyguy
    • #8
    • 28th Aug 11, 11:11 AM
    • #8
    • 28th Aug 11, 11:11 AM
    Agree with Googler,

    However the sort code is not important as far as fraud is concerned so I would send 2 emails with the full details of Name, bank, sort code and half the account number and then a seperate email with the last 4 digits of the account number on.
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 28th Aug 11, 12:04 PM
    • 7,102 Posts
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    pmduk
    • #9
    • 28th Aug 11, 12:04 PM
    • #9
    • 28th Aug 11, 12:04 PM
    Indeed. But when a bank phones a customer (number witheld) it expects the customer to confirm personal details such as date of birth. Pah.
    Originally posted by jalexa
    RBS were very surprised when I did this one day
  • aliasojo
    Make sure that those who send you money use the beneficiary /payment reference field. This is often left blank or misused as the use is entirely at the discretion of the payer. Without guidance, the payer cannot provide helpful information to the payee/beneficiary .
    J_B.
    Originally posted by Joe_Bloggs
    In this case the amount is unique (as in I will not have any other payments into the account anywhere near the region of this figure) and would be apparent where it originated from.

    If you're worried about putting them all in one e-mail which may be intercepted, split the sort code over 3 e-mails, and divvy the account number up in the same way, and ask the recipient at the other end to piece it together.
    Originally posted by googler
    Good idea, will do that.
    Herman - MP for all!
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 28th Aug 11, 1:22 PM
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    pmduk
    aliasojo, I'd also note that a response confirming receipt of your new details is not the same as confirmation that the details have been changed. I always ask them to provide written confirmation that they've made the necessary amendments.
  • aliasojo
    aliasojo, I'd also note that a response confirming receipt of your new details is not the same as confirmation that the details have been changed. I always ask them to provide written confirmation that they've made the necessary amendments.
    Originally posted by pmduk
    Thanks but this is to enable a one-off payment from a solicitor, it's not something that was in existance already so there's nothing to amend.
    Herman - MP for all!
    • Naf
    • By Naf 28th Aug 11, 3:22 PM
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    Naf
    There's only three things that could be done with your account number and sort code;
    1. Set up a Direct Debit and attempt to take money out. To be able to set up the DD in the first place the company must subscribe to the DD Guarantee, meaning that if they take or try to take money that you didn't agree to, you can claim it right back and have any related charges immediately refunded.
    2. Attempt to set up a Standing Order. This could only be done in writing, to your bank's head office. As the payment could only go to another UK account, even if it was set up (unlikely given it would need to be signed by you and written requests are carefully checked) then it would be an extremely simple matter for your bank to investigate who it went to.
    3. Pay money into your account; this is what you're wanting anyway. And I doubt you'd want to complain of someone wanted to give you more...

    All in all, your account number and sort code are safe details to give out.
    As above; any cheques have these details on, as does your debit card and your statements that come through the post. Any of these would be relatively easy places to get these details from, and banks are happy to continue, and have been for a long time.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.
    - Mark Twain
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon: no matter how good you are at chess, its just going to knock over the pieces and strut around like its victorious.
    • antrobus
    • By antrobus 28th Aug 11, 4:01 PM
    • 13,690 Posts
    • 18,971 Thanks
    antrobus
    ...

    1. Set up a Direct Debit and attempt to take money out. To be able to set up the DD in the first place the company must subscribe to the DD Guarantee, meaning that if they take or try to take money that you didn't agree to, you can claim it right back and have any related charges immediately refunded...
    Originally posted by Naf
    Somebody could take your bank details and use them to set up a direct debit with a third party that was not connected with the 'somebody'. Which is what happened to Jeremy Clarkson. He gave out his bank details on air, and somebody went and set up a DD using these details, and thus a fraction of the Clarkson millions got diverted into the coffers of some charity.

    Mind you that's not exactly what I would call a major threat. There must be a limited number of things you can pay for by DD that it would be worth someone's while trying to do so using someone else's bank details, so I wouldn't lose any sleep over it.
    • Naf
    • By Naf 28th Aug 11, 4:28 PM
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    • 2,166 Thanks
    Naf
    Somebody could take your bank details and use them to set up a direct debit with a third party that was not connected with the 'somebody'. Which is what happened to Jeremy Clarkson. He gave out his bank details on air, and somebody went and set up a DD using these details, and thus a fraction of the Clarkson millions got diverted into the coffers of some charity.

    Mind you that's not exactly what I would call a major threat. There must be a limited number of things you can pay for by DD that it would be worth someone's while trying to do so using someone else's bank details, so I wouldn't lose any sleep over it.
    Originally posted by antrobus

    Still completely covered by the DD guarantee which allows you to do a complete and (supposed to be) immediate indemnity retrieval...
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.
    - Mark Twain
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon: no matter how good you are at chess, its just going to knock over the pieces and strut around like its victorious.
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 28th Aug 11, 6:02 PM
    • 7,102 Posts
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    pmduk
    Still completely covered by the DD guarantee which allows you to do a complete and (supposed to be) immediate indemnity retrieval...
    Originally posted by Naf
    Only if you're sensible enough to check your statements regularly, I'm sure we've all read threads on here from people querying DDs that go back for years. Hopefully, the regulars on this forum would be more savvy.
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