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  • FIRST POST
    FLINT
    Cavity Wall Insulation
    • #1
    • 4th Aug 11, 6:25 PM
    Cavity Wall Insulation 4th Aug 11 at 6:25 PM
    Hi all I just wanted to share my views with the forum regarding cavity wall insulation. I had this done in 2004 after receiving a partial grant from one of the energy suppliers.

    Boy oh boy do I regret having it done. The type that was injected was a white mineral fibre wool type. As I have gotten older and been doing various house redecoration and renovations I have become more and more aware of damp issues along the walls that is filled with the insulation. My house is semi-detatched.

    I have had allsorts of issues such as a rotten floor joist, discovered whist renewing our kitchen, rotting floorboards at the foot of my hallway, damp and peeling paper along my staircase.

    Whilst having a new physical damp course installed the brickies drew my attention to the fact that the material was wet through.

    I have a suspended wooden floor and looked under not too long ago to discover wet rot on a couple of the joists, I asked a builder to have a look and he noticed that the underfloor vents had been blocked by the installers so not allowing free airflow under my floor. Since then I have also had extra vents fitted, this has helped but not much so i contacted CIGA who are the body who maintain the 25 year guarantee.

    Today I had a surveyor out from the company who bought out the original installers, I showed him my problems and to my surprise ADMITTED that my cavities at 40mm were not really suitable for the fill and so it should have never been done.

    I am due to have the stuff removed next week all being well and then the fight begins for compensation for redecoration and repairs.

    If anyone is interested or is experiencing similar problems I will update the thread.
    All I ask is the chance to prove that money can't make me happy...

    (Spike Milligan)
Page 2
  • Mrs A nonamous
    Thanks Lesley74 - yes, we've got a dehumidifier, but we're fighting a losing battle now as water is collecting in the cavity and soaking into the underfloor joists (this was confirmed by CIGA).
    I believe, in relation to the recommended width of the cavity, CIGA advice is not less than 50mm - in which case, Poet123, there are other recommended ways of insulating your home which may be more suitable for your particular case.
    The point I'm trying to make is that some CWI companies will tell you that your house is suitable when it isn't (like ours) - there are very lucrative government schemes available to businesses to install this stuff. However, getting them to put things right is a different matter. Although CIGA have ordered them to pay for removal of CWI in my home (which is being done this wednesday), they are not admitting liability and will not compensate me for damages (I don't want to make money here, just sort out the terrible mess this has caused)
    My advice to anyone going through this is to get it sorted and complain as soon as possible - It has been 3 years since the blown fibre was installed, and yes, we did notice improvements at first with a warmer house. But now the windows are running with water on the inside even if the heating isn't on, the wall ties are in need of replacing, salts are seeping out of the brick work, etc. etc. etc. If anyone has been successful in getting a company to pay for remedial work to put things right, please let me know.
  • South123
    We are having ours done next week. The OP mentioned 40mm as unsuitable for the procedure is that because it is too small or too big? Any tips from those who know what questions we should ask before we let them go ahead?
    Originally posted by poet123
    Bead insulation can be installed in cavity 40mm and above.

    Knauf carbon plus also can be installed in cavity 40mm and above.

    Knauf superfil 40, Rockwool and a few other systems require 50mm and above.

    Generally if there is a 40mm cavity width you might be able to claim for Hard To Treat under ECO funding, this should be signed off by a chartered surveyor.

    Make sure the insulation company boroscope every elevation for rumble and debris in the cavity and all air vents are sleeved and replaced before they install the insulation.
  • South123
    Thanks Lesley74 - yes, we've got a dehumidifier, but we're fighting a losing battle now as water is collecting in the cavity and soaking into the underfloor joists (this was confirmed by CIGA).
    I believe, in relation to the recommended width of the cavity, CIGA advice is not less than 50mm - in which case, Poet123, there are other recommended ways of insulating your home which may be more suitable for your particular case.
    The point I'm trying to make is that some CWI companies will tell you that your house is suitable when it isn't (like ours) - there are very lucrative government schemes available to businesses to install this stuff. However, getting them to put things right is a different matter. Although CIGA have ordered them to pay for removal of CWI in my home (which is being done this wednesday), they are not admitting liability and will not compensate me for damages (I don't want to make money here, just sort out the terrible mess this has caused)
    My advice to anyone going through this is to get it sorted and complain as soon as possible - It has been 3 years since the blown fibre was installed, and yes, we did notice improvements at first with a warmer house. But now the windows are running with water on the inside even if the heating isn't on, the wall ties are in need of replacing, salts are seeping out of the brick work, etc. etc. etc. If anyone has been successful in getting a company to pay for remedial work to put things right, please let me know.
    Originally posted by Mrs A nonamous
    I personally wouldn't bother with the dehumidifier until the wet insulation is removed! you are just dragging the moisture from the insulation through the inner leaf wall....once they have removed the insulation get them to fit some extra air vents to allow the cavity to breathe and dry out possible 9x6's (say three on a gable wall).

    In regards to the remedial work, look on your CIGA guarantee for the system designer they used i.e rockwool, knauf etc and ask for there rep to attend site on the day of extraction and possible BBA rep too! so they can see and document the wet insulation..... The company in question would not like to lose there system designer or BBA accreditation! without these they cant install anymore!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    And remember reputation to a company is everything "WINK"
    • mettie
    • By mettie 9th Sep 15, 9:33 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    mettie
    Hii All

    I had CWI in 2007 and started noticing damp patches in about 2010. Had people out to check ?rising damp certainly not as most of the damp was half way up the walls.

    Went to the company that installed it they came round and took all the insulation from the vents, as the brushes they are supposed to use were non-existant.

    Dampness got worse, went to CIGA refused to acknowledge there was a problem. Had surveyor out from CIGA who said it was not installed to BBA specifications. CIGA still refused to listen. Kept writing letters which were being ignored.

    Got involved with CWIVA who were a group dedicated to CWI problems. Had another surveyor out who said exactly same as first surveyor, only that it had to be removed As a matter of priority.

    It is now September 2015 I have had the CWI insulation removed. Believe it or not, my house is warmer now. Probably because the insulation was so wet when you squeezed it, water covered your hand.

    There has been massive damage to the walls, which I have had to have re-rendered, skimmed and redecorated. My bay window wall, has had to be re-built and the dampness corroded the bricks and mortar.

    I have only just got CIGA to agree to payment for the damage which is running into thousands.

    Gerry Miller of CIGA is one of the hardest man to get hold of. Never replies to emails but it shows that persistance wins in the end
    • Furts
    • By Furts 9th Sep 15, 9:52 PM
    • 2,886 Posts
    • 1,818 Thanks
    Furts
    Hii All

    I had CWI in 2007 and started noticing damp patches in about 2010. Had people out to check ?rising damp certainly not as most of the damp was half way up the walls.

    Went to the company that installed it they came round and took all the insulation from the vents, as the brushes they are supposed to use were non-existant.

    Dampness got worse, went to CIGA refused to acknowledge there was a problem. Had surveyor out from CIGA who said it was not installed to BBA specifications. CIGA still refused to listen. Kept writing letters which were being ignored.

    Got involved with CWIVA who were a group dedicated to CWI problems. Had another surveyor out who said exactly same as first surveyor, only that it had to be removed As a matter of priority.

    It is now September 2015 I have had the CWI insulation removed. Believe it or not, my house is warmer now. Probably because the insulation was so wet when you squeezed it, water covered your hand.

    There has been massive damage to the walls, which I have had to have re-rendered, skimmed and redecorated. My bay window wall, has had to be re-built and the dampness corroded the bricks and mortar.

    I have only just got CIGA to agree to payment for the damage which is running into thousands.

    Gerry Miller of CIGA is one of the hardest man to get hold of. Never replies to emails but it shows that persistance wins in the end
    Originally posted by mettie
    Gerry Miller sets the scene for his staff to follow. I live in hope that the Government will pull strings and sack all the staff. It can be done, and if I were Gerry Miler I would be feeling the heat rising. Of course, this is only my intuition, but he has received a hammering from the BBC.

    With regards to your home was it ever suitable for CWI in terms of its construction and degree of exposure? Plus which company did the installation?
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