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  • FIRST POST
    poppytigra
    accidental damage insurance won't pay
    • #1
    • 23rd Apr 11, 12:34 AM
    accidental damage insurance won't pay 23rd Apr 11 at 12:34 AM
    I have spilt gloss paint on my lounge carpet when painting a door frame, it splashed onto my leather sofa and into the hallway carpet and up the hallway wallpaper.
    I phone the insurance company (Esure) the next morning to log the claim. He asked if I used dust sheets and I said no. He said to leave the damage alone, so not attempt to clean or rub it else it will invalidate a claim and a manager will call me back within 2 days. I therefore left it all to dry and awaited my call. Today was day 3 and i hadn't received a call so i rang them. I was told i had no claim as i did not use dust sheets therefore due care and attention was not taken as apparently states in the policy document (which I cannot find). I said i would not use dust sheets to paint a door frame, and due care and attention was taken as i waited until my 3 children were in bed and locked dog outside. She maintained that dust sheets must be used to validate a claim. I also bought up the point that due to the paint completely drying as I was told not to touch it, the damage is now irrepairable whereas it could have been improved if it was tackled there and then and surely the original advisor would have known the claim was invalid as I declared I did not use dust sheets. Also I did not get a call within 2 days and as today is bank holiday as is monday, I will not get a call until Tuesday now. I have escalated it to a complaint but would really welcome advise on where I stand. Must dust sheets be used? Should I have been told there and then the claim would be invalid so i could have attempted to clean it? Also, if I had used dust sheets (which i wouldn't dream of when painting a door frame), I would not have draped them all over my sofa and the hall wallpaper would still be damaged, and the paint would have splashed right off the dust sheet anyway as the perimeter of the splashes is massive. Please help as I am very nervous about this complaints manager calling on Tuesday and I have not made a claim for about 7 years. thank you in advance and sorry for waffling!
Page 1
  • diable
    • #2
    • 23rd Apr 11, 1:14 AM
    • #2
    • 23rd Apr 11, 1:14 AM
    WoW that was hard to read can you punctuate?

    Did you spill the gloss paint from your paint brush or did you drop the tin of paint?

    Also what is your excess as the claim may be prohibitive.
  • dacouch
    • #3
    • 23rd Apr 11, 6:22 AM
    • #3
    • 23rd Apr 11, 6:22 AM
    You need to follow the process of making an official complaint.

    It would be prudent to always use dust sheets in the future
  • Incyder
    • #4
    • 23rd Apr 11, 10:53 AM
    • #4
    • 23rd Apr 11, 10:53 AM
    I have spilt gloss paint on my lounge carpet when painting a door frame, it splashed onto my leather sofa and into the hallway carpet and up the hallway wallpaper.

    I am very nervous about this complaints manager calling on Tuesday
    Originally posted by poppytigra
    Gloss is very thick and does not splash about. You seem to have made no attempt to clean the paint off before ringing the insurance, I would have. You say using a dust sheet for painting just a door is something you wouldn't do, I would.

    I hope this obvious con is uncovered and you don't get paid. It's claims like this that make everyone elses premiums go up each year. If you want new furniture, carpets and wallpaper then save up for it like people have to do.

    Last edited by Incyder; 23-04-2011 at 11:16 AM.
  • vaio
    • #5
    • 23rd Apr 11, 12:07 PM
    • #5
    • 23rd Apr 11, 12:07 PM
    that looks like a really useful stamp/image, now tucked away on my computer for future use
  • societys child
    • #6
    • 23rd Apr 11, 1:51 PM
    • #6
    • 23rd Apr 11, 1:51 PM
    Gloss is very thick and does not splash about. You seem to have made no attempt to clean the paint off before ringing the insurance, I would have. You say using a dust sheet for painting just a door is something you wouldn't do, I would.

    I hope this obvious con is uncovered and you don't get paid. It's claims like this that make everyone elses premiums go up each year. If you want new furniture, carpets and wallpaper thensave up for it like people have to do.
    Originally posted by Incyder
    That's what I thought . . .


    Originally posted by Incyder
    Humm . . yeah.
  • Enterprise 1701C
    • #7
    • 23rd Apr 11, 2:26 PM
    • #7
    • 23rd Apr 11, 2:26 PM
    Unfortunately it does splash about if dropped from the top of a ladder!!! Also, fortunately, I used dust sheets! I have learned to cover everything when I am doing any painting!

    Sorry OP, due care and attention should be practiced at all times when you are decorating, the only thing gloss comes off easily is glass, cover everything else up.
    What is this life if, full of care, we have no time to stand and stare
  • Incyder
    • #8
    • 23rd Apr 11, 2:36 PM
    • #8
    • 23rd Apr 11, 2:36 PM
    These insurance guys are no mugs on this type of thing these days. I saw a documentary about them a couple of years ago on channel 4. They have replicated every type of paint spill and splash from every angle and height and paint types in labs and have charts with all the possible splash combinations and coverage possibilities and can tell when someone is trying to carry out a fraud.
  • mikey72
    • #9
    • 23rd Apr 11, 3:43 PM
    • #9
    • 23rd Apr 11, 3:43 PM
    I have spilt gloss paint on my lounge carpet when painting a door frame, it splashed onto my leather sofa and into the hallway carpet and up the hallway wallpaper.
    I phone the insurance company (Esure) the next morning to log the claim. He asked if I used dust sheets and I said no. He said to leave the damage alone, so not attempt to clean or rub it else it will invalidate a claim and a manager will call me back within 2 days. I therefore left it all to dry and awaited my call. Today was day 3 and i hadn't received a call so i rang them. I was told i had no claim as i did not use dust sheets therefore due care and attention was not taken as apparently states in the policy document (which I cannot find). I said i would not use dust sheets to paint a door frame, and due care and attention was taken as i waited until my 3 children were in bed and locked dog outside. She maintained that dust sheets must be used to validate a claim. I also bought up the point that due to the paint completely drying as I was told not to touch it, the damage is now irrepairable whereas it could have been improved if it was tackled there and then and surely the original advisor would have known the claim was invalid as I declared I did not use dust sheets. Also I did not get a call within 2 days and as today is bank holiday as is monday, I will not get a call until Tuesday now. I have escalated it to a complaint but would really welcome advise on where I stand. Must dust sheets be used? Should I have been told there and then the claim would be invalid so i could have attempted to clean it? Also, if I had used dust sheets (which i wouldn't dream of when painting a door frame), I would not have draped them all over my sofa and the hall wallpaper would still be damaged, and the paint would have splashed right off the dust sheet anyway as the perimeter of the splashes is massive. Please help as I am very nervous about this complaints manager calling on Tuesday and I have not made a claim for about 7 years. thank you in advance and sorry for waffling!
    Originally posted by poppytigra
    The thread is following the usual route I see.

    What you need to do to progress the claim is to submit a written complaint, with photographs of the affected items, and tell them if they do not resolve it to your satisfaction, you will submit a complaint to the FOS.
    Maybe they will decide you should have used dust sheets, maybe they won't, but the FOS will make an impartial decision.

    http://www.financial-ombudsman.org.uk/
  • cajef
    I have spilt gloss paint on my lounge carpet when painting a door frame, it splashed onto my leather sofa and into the hallway carpet and up the hallway wallpaper.
    I phone the insurance company (Esure) the next morning to log the claim.
    I therefore left it all to dry and awaited my call.
    Originally posted by poppytigra
    I am still trying to work out how it managed to splash on the sofa, the lounge and hall carpet and the hall wallpaper, it managed to spread itself around a bit, that was one hell of a splash.

    Anyway if it was left overnight without any attempt to clean it up it would have been too late to do anything, why did you not try and remove it as soon as it happened.
    I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
  • Absolutely
    These insurance guys are no mugs on this type of thing these days. I saw a documentary about them a couple of years ago on channel 4. They have replicated every type of paint spill and splash from every angle and height and paint types in labs and have charts with all the possible splash combinations and coverage possibilities and can tell when someone is trying to carry out a fraud.
    Originally posted by Incyder
    The older I get, the less insurance I take out. It's practically worthless. Save the money up instead and use it in case some such calamity occurs.
  • Tygermoth
    Gloss is known as a paint that is hard to remove and causes items to immediately require replacement rather than cleaning which would be the first avenue for insurers.


    Most insurers will consider any claim where both contents and buildings are involved over a number of items that are due for redecoration or replacement in the course of normal household updating as worth investigation.


    Due to this I do believe the dust sheets/reasonable care was added to policies to protect from individuals using gloss or similar from being used in an attempt to gain the most out of one claim.
  • Dangermac
    The older I get, the less insurance I take out. It's practically worthless. Save the money up instead and use it in case some such calamity occurs.
    Originally posted by Absolutely
    Brilliant advice......providing your crystal ball is working and providing that your household buildings/contents have little value.

    Otherwise, ignore this advice, unless you have very deep pockets and are prepared to use it.

    DM
  • vaio
    I (and I suspect it’s what Absolutely meant) go for insurance I’m obliged to have and for those things I couldn’t self insure.

    Car third party is legally needed and although I could self insure on the damage to my own car side it’s actually cheaper to get a policy that covers that than it is to get one that just covers third party.

    I couldn’t sensibly rebuild my house or replace all the contents if I had a fire so I insure that too.

    Would I claim for the odd paint scrape on the car or a broken TV, paint splashed carpet etc? Nah, and where ever possible I set my excess to reflect that. If I make a claim it will be for a written off car or destroyed house.

    Would I even consider taking out a policy to cover boiler/fridge/TV/pipes etc? Not in a million years, that sort of thing is certainly better being self insured and the number of people trying to sell these sorts of policies is a good indication of how profitable they are and why they are a bad idea from the MSE point of view.
  • Dangermac
    I (and I suspect its what Absolutely meant) go for insurance Im obliged to have and for those things I couldnt self insure.

    Car third party is legally needed and although I could self insure on the damage to my own car side its actually cheaper to get a policy that covers that than it is to get one that just covers third party.

    I couldnt sensibly rebuild my house or replace all the contents if I had a fire so I insure that too.

    Would I claim for the odd paint scrape on the car or a broken TV, paint splashed carpet etc? Nah, and where ever possible I set my excess to reflect that. If I make a claim it will be for a written off car or destroyed house.

    Would I even consider taking out a policy to cover boiler/fridge/TV/pipes etc? Not in a million years, that sort of thing is certainly better being self insured and the number of people trying to sell these sorts of policies is a good indication of how profitable they are and why they are a bad idea from the MSE point of view.
    Originally posted by vaio
    That wasnt how I interpreted Absolutely 's post.

    I can 100% see your point regarding the boiler/fridge etc

    DM
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